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Zeitschriftendaten
Format
Zeitschrift
eISSN
1875-855X
Erstveröffentlichung
01 Jun 2007
Erscheinungsweise
6 Hefte pro Jahr
Sprachen
Englisch

Suche

Volumen 10 (2016): Heft s1 (December 2016)

Zeitschriftendaten
Format
Zeitschrift
eISSN
1875-855X
Erstveröffentlichung
01 Jun 2007
Erscheinungsweise
6 Hefte pro Jahr
Sprachen
Englisch

Suche

8 Artikel

Review article

Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Asia: an update

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s3 - s14

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Prevalence estimates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Asia are diverse, ranging from <0.1% to 1.1%. In Asia, approximately 4.7 million people are living with HIV and 310,000 are newly infected each year. The fastest growth of the epidemic throughout Asia is among men who have sex with men (MSM). Drug resistance varies from 4%-5% in an Asian cohort to 10% in an acutely infected MSM cohort in Bangkok. A rise (4%-14%) in the prevalence of syphilis is associated with the HIV epidemic in Asia. Tuberculosis is among the most common coinfections; however, HIV testing of tuberculosis patients is not routine. Coinfection with HBV, HCV, and triple coinfection varies from 8.7%-11%, 5%-18%, and 0.4%-3% respectively. Although the World Health Organization 2013 guidelines to start antiretroviral therapy (ART) early are implemented, most patients present late, with low CD4 counts, resulting in a high mortality during the first year of ART. While integrase inhibitor-based treatments are preferred first-line treatments in high income countries, efavirenz-based treatments remain preferred treatments in resource-limited countries. HIV-1 viral load testing is not available in most of these countries, making low-cost point-of-care testing accessibility an urgent priority. Effective ART coverage to prevent new HIV infections among children in Asia remains low. To provide life-long ART for children, better use of current first-line regimens and access to pediatric second-line formulations are important. To end AIDS in Asia by 2030, committed policy with innovative strategies to enhance “reach recruit, treat and retain” combined with effective prevention strategies are required.

Schlüsselwörter

  • AIDS
  • Asia
  • HIV

Mini review article

Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Pathophysiology of parkinsonian tremor: a focused narrative review

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s15 - s22

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Tremor is one of the most common and most debilitating symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Classic pill-rolling resting tremor is characteristic of PD and distinguishes it from other neurodegenerative disorders. Although it represents the most typical and most common form of tremor in PD, other tremor manifestations have also been reported to occur in PD. In this article, we review the current clinical classification of tremor with a focus on different types of parkinsonian tremor based on the consensus statement of the Movement Disorders Society. We also provide an overview of different hypotheses on the central mechanisms of the pathophysiology of parkinsonian tremor, and provide evidence for why peripheral mechanisms may play a role in the modulation of PD tremor.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Parkinson’s disease
  • pathophysiology
  • tremor

Original article

Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Thai patients receiving various modalities of renal replacement therapy

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s39 - s48

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Vitamin D status of Thai patients receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) is incompletely known.

To determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency in adult Thai patients receiving various RRT modalities, and factors associated with low vitamin D levels.

In this retrospective, observational, single-center, cross-sectional study, we evaluated dialysis-related laboratory test variables from 111 patients receiving RRT. Serum 25-hydroxyvitaminD concentration [25(OH)D] < 15 ng/mL was defined as deficiency, and 15–30 ng/mL as insufficiency.

Low vitamin D levels were identified in 100% patients receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD; 81% deficient, 19% insufficient), 94% patients receiving online-hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF; 50% deficient, 44% insufficient), and 100% patients with kidney transplants (KT; 55% deficient, 45% insufficient). PD patients showed significantly lower serum [25(OH)D] than OL-HDF or KT patients (10.5 ± 5.9 vs 17.7 ± 8.5 vs 15.4 ± 6.1 ng/mL respectively, P < 0.001). OL-HDF patients with vitamin D deficiency had significantly lower vascular access flow than those without deficiency (833 ± 365 vs 1239 ± 385 mL/min, P = 0.008). KT recipients from deceased donors had lower serum [25(OH)D] than KT recipients from living, related donors (13.7 ± 6.0 vs 17.5 ± 5.7 ng/mL, P = 0.045). Multiple logistic regression found treatment by renin-angiotensin system blockade, serum triglyceride, and intact parathyroid hormone levels significantly associated with vitamin D deficiency after adjusting for sex, and serum calcium, phosphate, and albumin levels.

Nearly 100% patients receiving RRT had vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency, and RRT modalities might be related.

Schlüsselwörter

  • prevalence
  • renal replacement therapy
  • vitamin D deficiency
  • 25 hydroxyvitamin D
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Diagnostic accuracy of reticulocyte hemoglobin content in Thai patients with microcytic red cells as a test for iron deficiency anemia

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s31 - s37

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr) is helpful for early diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). However, its use is limited in thalassemia carriers.

To determine the accuracy of CHr and reticulocyte count as a test for iron deficiency anemia in Thai patients with microcytic red cells given the high prevalence of thalassemia carriers in Thailand.

Thai patients with adult microcytic anemia (mean corpuscular volume ≤80 fL) were prospectively enrolled. We conducted an automated complete blood count, reticulocyte count (with CHr), ferritin, and hemoglobin analysis. IDA was defined by a ferritin reference level <50 μg/L and ≥1 g/dL response within a month to iron dietary supplement. Cutoff points were determined from receiver operating characteristic curves.

We included 168 patients (53 with IDA, 50 with anemia of inflammation (AI), 49 with thalassemia traits, and 16 with thalassemia diseases) and 99 healthy controls. The CHr in patients with IDA and thalassemia disease were significantly less than those in patients with AI and thalassemia trait (P < 0.001), who in turn had lower CHr compared with normal controls (P < 0.001). Patients with thalassemia were distinguished by their high reticulocyte counts. After excluding thalassemia, a cutoff CHr <27.0 pg showed a sensitivity of 84.9% and specificity of 77.8% for IDA diagnosis. Additionally, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) <31.6 g/dL showed a sensitivity of 81.1% and specificity of 83.7% for IDA diagnosis.

CHr combined with additional information about reticulocyte count and MCHC is useful for diagnosis of IDA in Thais.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Diagnostic test
  • iron deficiency
  • microcytic anemia
  • reticulocyte hemoglobin content
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Acute diarrhea, a significant burden to Thailand’s universal health care system: a nationwide database

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s23 - s30

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

The burden of acute diarrheal diseases is a major problem in Thailand. The mortality rate is 0.5% of admissions in the 2010 Nationwide Hospital Admission Data. Data from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study in 2010 showed that the mortality rate of diarrheal disease was 2.65% of all deaths globally.

To examine the burden of adult acute diarrhea in Thailand using nationwide data in 2010.

There were 820,735 admissions of patients aged ≥19 years with a diagnosis of digestive diseases (ICD10-K00-K93) and acute diarrhea (ICD10-A09). About one-third of admissions (214,722 admissions; 26%) were for acute diarrhea with a mean patient age 51.5 (SD 15.3) years.

Approximately two-thirds of the 214,722 admissions were for acute diarrhea (59%) in patients 19–60 years old, and the remaining 41% were elderly patients >60 years old. Approximately 0.5% of admitted patients (1,048 patients) died. The complications during hospitalization were septicemia (2.2%), mechanical ventilation (0.6%), and renal failure requiring hemodialysis (0.14%). The predictors of mortality were patients >60 years old at admission, male sex, and the presence of complications. The total cost for management of acute diarrhea in Thailand in 2010 was 905,784,298 baht or 30,035,807 USD for 214,722 admissions.

Acute diarrheal diseases accounted for 26% of the digestive diseases in the 2010 Thai nationwide data with high expenditure.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Acute diarrhea
  • burden
  • database
  • Thailand
  • universal health care system

Brief Communication (Original)

Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and atherosclerosis of cervical or intracranial cerebral vessels in Thai patients

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s57 - s62

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is associated with coronary and carotid atherosclerosis. The prevalence of chlamydia infection varies from one country to another. Prevalence is related to socioeconomic status and sites of atherosclerosis differ between different ethnicities.

To study the association between chlamydia infections and cervicocerebral atherosclerosis in Thai patients.

In this observational case-control study, patients with significant extracranial carotid artery or intracranial artery stenosis by ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were studied and compared with an age- and sex-matched group of control participants without evidence of carotid stenosis by ultrasound. Antibodies to C. pneumoniae were studied by microimmunofluorescence. IgG titer ≥1:64 or IgA titer ≥ 1:16 were considered positive.

We included 75 patient participants in the case group with evidence of significant carotid or intracranial stenosis and 75 control participants. IgA seropositivity for C. pneumoniae was found in 12 patients in the case group (16%) and 1 control participant (1.3%) (OR 14.1; P = 0.001). In the case group, 43 patients participants (57%) and 40 (53%) control participants were seropositive for C. pneumoniae IgG (OR 1.18; P = 0.62). Multivariate analysis revealed that IgA seropositivity was significantly associated with both cervical and intracranial cerebral atherosclerosis independent of other vascular risk factors.

C. pneumoniae IgA seropositivity is associated with cervicocerebral atherosclerosis in Thai patients. This association is independent of other vascular risk factors and is present in almost all subgroups including those with extracranial carotid, intracranial artery, and combined stenoses.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Atherrosclerosis
  • cerrical
  • chlamydia pneumonia
  • intracranial vessels
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Accuracy of noninvasive scoring systems to assess advanced liver fibrosis in Thai patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s49 - s55

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Liver biopsy is the criterion standard to assess liver fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is important for prognosis, whereas noninvasive scoring systems showing promise for predicting fibrotic status include aspartate/alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) ratio, BARD score, fibrosis–4-score (FIB-4), and the NAFLD Fibrosis Score (NFS).

To determine the accuracy of noninvasive scoring systems to predict advanced fibrosis in Thai patients with NAFLD.

A prospective cross-sectional study of Thai patients with liver biopsy-proven NAFLD during January 2009-October 2012 at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Baseline NFS, BARD, and FIB-4 calculations were used to distinguish patients with NAFLD with and without advanced liver fibrosis, using cutoffs for NFS ≥ -1.455, BARD ≥ 2, and FIB-4 >1.3 (http://gihep.com/calculators/hepatology/).

We included 139 patients mean age 40.95 (SD 13.3) years (47% male). Impaired fasting glucose or diabetes mellitus was found in 75, 9 showed advanced fibrosis (≥F3) by liver histology. NFS with cutoff ≥ -1.455 was determined as the best system with the highest sensitivity for identifying patients with advanced fibrosis, followed by BARD ≥2, FIB-4 >1.45, and AST/ALT ratio >0.8. Liver biopsy could potentially be avoided in >38% of patients with BARD, 46% with NFS, 64% with AST/ALT ratio, and 81% with FIB-4.

Advanced fibrosis was prevalent in 6% of our Thai patients with NAFLD. NFS had the highest negative predictive value for excluding patients with advanced fibrosis. At least 38% of patients with NAFLD could avoid liver biopsy by using the BARD system.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Advanced liver fibrosis
  • NAFLD
  • noninvasive scoring systems
  • validity
8 Artikel

Review article

Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Asia: an update

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s3 - s14

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Prevalence estimates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Asia are diverse, ranging from <0.1% to 1.1%. In Asia, approximately 4.7 million people are living with HIV and 310,000 are newly infected each year. The fastest growth of the epidemic throughout Asia is among men who have sex with men (MSM). Drug resistance varies from 4%-5% in an Asian cohort to 10% in an acutely infected MSM cohort in Bangkok. A rise (4%-14%) in the prevalence of syphilis is associated with the HIV epidemic in Asia. Tuberculosis is among the most common coinfections; however, HIV testing of tuberculosis patients is not routine. Coinfection with HBV, HCV, and triple coinfection varies from 8.7%-11%, 5%-18%, and 0.4%-3% respectively. Although the World Health Organization 2013 guidelines to start antiretroviral therapy (ART) early are implemented, most patients present late, with low CD4 counts, resulting in a high mortality during the first year of ART. While integrase inhibitor-based treatments are preferred first-line treatments in high income countries, efavirenz-based treatments remain preferred treatments in resource-limited countries. HIV-1 viral load testing is not available in most of these countries, making low-cost point-of-care testing accessibility an urgent priority. Effective ART coverage to prevent new HIV infections among children in Asia remains low. To provide life-long ART for children, better use of current first-line regimens and access to pediatric second-line formulations are important. To end AIDS in Asia by 2030, committed policy with innovative strategies to enhance “reach recruit, treat and retain” combined with effective prevention strategies are required.

Schlüsselwörter

  • AIDS
  • Asia
  • HIV

Mini review article

Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Pathophysiology of parkinsonian tremor: a focused narrative review

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s15 - s22

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Tremor is one of the most common and most debilitating symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Classic pill-rolling resting tremor is characteristic of PD and distinguishes it from other neurodegenerative disorders. Although it represents the most typical and most common form of tremor in PD, other tremor manifestations have also been reported to occur in PD. In this article, we review the current clinical classification of tremor with a focus on different types of parkinsonian tremor based on the consensus statement of the Movement Disorders Society. We also provide an overview of different hypotheses on the central mechanisms of the pathophysiology of parkinsonian tremor, and provide evidence for why peripheral mechanisms may play a role in the modulation of PD tremor.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Parkinson’s disease
  • pathophysiology
  • tremor

Original article

Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Thai patients receiving various modalities of renal replacement therapy

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s39 - s48

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Vitamin D status of Thai patients receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) is incompletely known.

To determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency in adult Thai patients receiving various RRT modalities, and factors associated with low vitamin D levels.

In this retrospective, observational, single-center, cross-sectional study, we evaluated dialysis-related laboratory test variables from 111 patients receiving RRT. Serum 25-hydroxyvitaminD concentration [25(OH)D] < 15 ng/mL was defined as deficiency, and 15–30 ng/mL as insufficiency.

Low vitamin D levels were identified in 100% patients receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD; 81% deficient, 19% insufficient), 94% patients receiving online-hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF; 50% deficient, 44% insufficient), and 100% patients with kidney transplants (KT; 55% deficient, 45% insufficient). PD patients showed significantly lower serum [25(OH)D] than OL-HDF or KT patients (10.5 ± 5.9 vs 17.7 ± 8.5 vs 15.4 ± 6.1 ng/mL respectively, P < 0.001). OL-HDF patients with vitamin D deficiency had significantly lower vascular access flow than those without deficiency (833 ± 365 vs 1239 ± 385 mL/min, P = 0.008). KT recipients from deceased donors had lower serum [25(OH)D] than KT recipients from living, related donors (13.7 ± 6.0 vs 17.5 ± 5.7 ng/mL, P = 0.045). Multiple logistic regression found treatment by renin-angiotensin system blockade, serum triglyceride, and intact parathyroid hormone levels significantly associated with vitamin D deficiency after adjusting for sex, and serum calcium, phosphate, and albumin levels.

Nearly 100% patients receiving RRT had vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency, and RRT modalities might be related.

Schlüsselwörter

  • prevalence
  • renal replacement therapy
  • vitamin D deficiency
  • 25 hydroxyvitamin D
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Diagnostic accuracy of reticulocyte hemoglobin content in Thai patients with microcytic red cells as a test for iron deficiency anemia

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s31 - s37

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr) is helpful for early diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). However, its use is limited in thalassemia carriers.

To determine the accuracy of CHr and reticulocyte count as a test for iron deficiency anemia in Thai patients with microcytic red cells given the high prevalence of thalassemia carriers in Thailand.

Thai patients with adult microcytic anemia (mean corpuscular volume ≤80 fL) were prospectively enrolled. We conducted an automated complete blood count, reticulocyte count (with CHr), ferritin, and hemoglobin analysis. IDA was defined by a ferritin reference level <50 μg/L and ≥1 g/dL response within a month to iron dietary supplement. Cutoff points were determined from receiver operating characteristic curves.

We included 168 patients (53 with IDA, 50 with anemia of inflammation (AI), 49 with thalassemia traits, and 16 with thalassemia diseases) and 99 healthy controls. The CHr in patients with IDA and thalassemia disease were significantly less than those in patients with AI and thalassemia trait (P < 0.001), who in turn had lower CHr compared with normal controls (P < 0.001). Patients with thalassemia were distinguished by their high reticulocyte counts. After excluding thalassemia, a cutoff CHr <27.0 pg showed a sensitivity of 84.9% and specificity of 77.8% for IDA diagnosis. Additionally, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) <31.6 g/dL showed a sensitivity of 81.1% and specificity of 83.7% for IDA diagnosis.

CHr combined with additional information about reticulocyte count and MCHC is useful for diagnosis of IDA in Thais.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Diagnostic test
  • iron deficiency
  • microcytic anemia
  • reticulocyte hemoglobin content
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Acute diarrhea, a significant burden to Thailand’s universal health care system: a nationwide database

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s23 - s30

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

The burden of acute diarrheal diseases is a major problem in Thailand. The mortality rate is 0.5% of admissions in the 2010 Nationwide Hospital Admission Data. Data from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study in 2010 showed that the mortality rate of diarrheal disease was 2.65% of all deaths globally.

To examine the burden of adult acute diarrhea in Thailand using nationwide data in 2010.

There were 820,735 admissions of patients aged ≥19 years with a diagnosis of digestive diseases (ICD10-K00-K93) and acute diarrhea (ICD10-A09). About one-third of admissions (214,722 admissions; 26%) were for acute diarrhea with a mean patient age 51.5 (SD 15.3) years.

Approximately two-thirds of the 214,722 admissions were for acute diarrhea (59%) in patients 19–60 years old, and the remaining 41% were elderly patients >60 years old. Approximately 0.5% of admitted patients (1,048 patients) died. The complications during hospitalization were septicemia (2.2%), mechanical ventilation (0.6%), and renal failure requiring hemodialysis (0.14%). The predictors of mortality were patients >60 years old at admission, male sex, and the presence of complications. The total cost for management of acute diarrhea in Thailand in 2010 was 905,784,298 baht or 30,035,807 USD for 214,722 admissions.

Acute diarrheal diseases accounted for 26% of the digestive diseases in the 2010 Thai nationwide data with high expenditure.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Acute diarrhea
  • burden
  • database
  • Thailand
  • universal health care system

Brief Communication (Original)

Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and atherosclerosis of cervical or intracranial cerebral vessels in Thai patients

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s57 - s62

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is associated with coronary and carotid atherosclerosis. The prevalence of chlamydia infection varies from one country to another. Prevalence is related to socioeconomic status and sites of atherosclerosis differ between different ethnicities.

To study the association between chlamydia infections and cervicocerebral atherosclerosis in Thai patients.

In this observational case-control study, patients with significant extracranial carotid artery or intracranial artery stenosis by ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were studied and compared with an age- and sex-matched group of control participants without evidence of carotid stenosis by ultrasound. Antibodies to C. pneumoniae were studied by microimmunofluorescence. IgG titer ≥1:64 or IgA titer ≥ 1:16 were considered positive.

We included 75 patient participants in the case group with evidence of significant carotid or intracranial stenosis and 75 control participants. IgA seropositivity for C. pneumoniae was found in 12 patients in the case group (16%) and 1 control participant (1.3%) (OR 14.1; P = 0.001). In the case group, 43 patients participants (57%) and 40 (53%) control participants were seropositive for C. pneumoniae IgG (OR 1.18; P = 0.62). Multivariate analysis revealed that IgA seropositivity was significantly associated with both cervical and intracranial cerebral atherosclerosis independent of other vascular risk factors.

C. pneumoniae IgA seropositivity is associated with cervicocerebral atherosclerosis in Thai patients. This association is independent of other vascular risk factors and is present in almost all subgroups including those with extracranial carotid, intracranial artery, and combined stenoses.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Atherrosclerosis
  • cerrical
  • chlamydia pneumonia
  • intracranial vessels
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

Accuracy of noninvasive scoring systems to assess advanced liver fibrosis in Thai patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Online veröffentlicht: 31 Mar 2017
Seitenbereich: s49 - s55

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Liver biopsy is the criterion standard to assess liver fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is important for prognosis, whereas noninvasive scoring systems showing promise for predicting fibrotic status include aspartate/alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) ratio, BARD score, fibrosis–4-score (FIB-4), and the NAFLD Fibrosis Score (NFS).

To determine the accuracy of noninvasive scoring systems to predict advanced fibrosis in Thai patients with NAFLD.

A prospective cross-sectional study of Thai patients with liver biopsy-proven NAFLD during January 2009-October 2012 at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Baseline NFS, BARD, and FIB-4 calculations were used to distinguish patients with NAFLD with and without advanced liver fibrosis, using cutoffs for NFS ≥ -1.455, BARD ≥ 2, and FIB-4 >1.3 (http://gihep.com/calculators/hepatology/).

We included 139 patients mean age 40.95 (SD 13.3) years (47% male). Impaired fasting glucose or diabetes mellitus was found in 75, 9 showed advanced fibrosis (≥F3) by liver histology. NFS with cutoff ≥ -1.455 was determined as the best system with the highest sensitivity for identifying patients with advanced fibrosis, followed by BARD ≥2, FIB-4 >1.45, and AST/ALT ratio >0.8. Liver biopsy could potentially be avoided in >38% of patients with BARD, 46% with NFS, 64% with AST/ALT ratio, and 81% with FIB-4.

Advanced fibrosis was prevalent in 6% of our Thai patients with NAFLD. NFS had the highest negative predictive value for excluding patients with advanced fibrosis. At least 38% of patients with NAFLD could avoid liver biopsy by using the BARD system.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Advanced liver fibrosis
  • NAFLD
  • noninvasive scoring systems
  • validity

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