Journal & Issues

Volume 32 (2023): Issue 3 (July 2023)

Volume 32 (2023): Issue 2 (May 2023)

Volume 32 (2023): Issue 1 (March 2023)

Volume 31 (2022): Issue 3 (November 2022)

Volume 31 (2022): Issue 2 (July 2022)

Volume 31 (2022): Issue 1 (March 2022)

Volume 30 (2021): Issue 4 (November 2021)

Volume 30 (2021): Issue 3 (July 2021)

Volume 30 (2021): Issue 2 (May 2021)

Volume 30 (2021): Issue 1 (March 2021)

Volume 29 (2020): Issue 3 (December 2020)

Volume 29 (2020): Issue 2 (August 2020)

Volume 29 (2020): Issue 1 (April 2020)

Volume 28 (2019): Issue 7 (December 2019)

Volume 28 (2019): Issue 6 (August 2019)

Volume 28 (2019): Issue 5 (May 2019)

Volume 28 (2018): Issue 4 (December 2018)

Volume 28 (2018): Issue 3 (October 2018)

Volume 28 (2018): Issue 2 (August 2018)

Volume 28 (2018): Issue 1 (April 2018)

Volume 27 (2017): Issue 8 (December 2017)

Volume 27 (2017): Issue 7 (September 2017)

Volume 27 (2017): Issue 6 (April 2017)

Volume 27 (2017): Issue 5 (January 2017)

Volume 27 (2016): Issue 4 (October 2016)

Volume 27 (2016): Issue 3 (July 2016)

Volume 27 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 27 (2016): Issue 1 (January 2016)

Volume 26 (2015): Issue 7 (September 2015)

Volume 26 (2015): Issue 6 (June 2015)

Volume 26 (2015): Issue 5 (March 2015)

Volume 26 (2015): Issue 4 (January 2015)

Volume 26 (2014): Issue 3 (September 2014)

Volume 26 (2014): Issue 2 (July 2014)

Volume 26 (2014): Issue 1 (April 2014)

Volume 25 (2013): Issue 8 (December 2013)

Volume 25 (2013): Issue 7 (September 2013)

Volume 25 (2013): Issue 6 (June 2013)

Volume 25 (2013): Issue 5 (March 2013)

Volume 25 (2012): Issue 4 (December 2012)

Volume 25 (2012): Issue 3 (August 2012)

Volume 25 (2012): Issue 2 (June 2012)

Volume 25 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 24 (2011): Issue 6 (November 2011)

Volume 24 (2011): Issue 5 (May 2011)

Volume 24 (2011): Issue 4 (January 2011)

Volume 24 (2010): Issue 3 (November 2010)

Volume 24 (2010): Issue 2 (July 2010)

Volume 24 (2010): Issue 1 (April 2010)

Volume 23 (2009): Issue 6 (December 2009)

Volume 23 (2009): Issue 5 (September 2009)

Volume 23 (2009): Issue 4 (May 2009)

Volume 23 (2008): Issue 3 (December 2008)

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Volume 23 (2008): Issue 1 (April 2008)

Volume 22 (2007): Issue 5 (June 2007)

Volume 22 (2007): Issue 4 (January 2007)

Volume 22 (2006): Issue 3 (October 2006)

Volume 22 (2006): Issue 2 (July 2006)

Volume 22 (2006): Issue 1 (April 2006)

Volume 21 (2005): Issue 8 (December 2005)

Volume 21 (2005): Issue 7 (October 2005)

Volume 21 (2005): Issue 6 (July 2005)

Volume 21 (2005): Issue 5 (April 2005)

Volume 21 (2004): Issue 4 (December 2004)

Volume 21 (2004): Issue 3 (October 2004)

Volume 21 (2004): Issue 2 (July 2004)

Volume 21 (2004): Issue 1 (March 2004)

Volume 20 (2003): Issue 8 (December 2003)

Volume 20 (2003): Issue 7 (November 2003)

Volume 20 (2003): Issue 6 (July 2003)

Volume 20 (2003): Issue 5 (March 2003)

Volume 20 (2002): Issue 4 (December 2002)

Volume 20 (2002): Issue 3 (August 2002)

Volume 20 (2002): Issue 2 (June 2002)

Volume 20 (2002): Issue 1 (February 2002)

Volume 19 (2001): Issue 7 (October 2001)

Volume 19 (2001): Issue 6 (July 2001)

Volume 19 (2001): Issue 5 (April 2001)

Volume 19 (2001): Issue 4 (January 2001)

Volume 19 (2000): Issue 3 (October 2000)

Volume 19 (2000): Issue 2 (July 2000)

Volume 19 (2000): Issue 1 (April 2000)

Volume 18 (1999): Issue 6 (December 1999)

Volume 18 (1999): Issue 5 (July 1999)

Volume 18 (1999): Issue 4 (April 1999)

Volume 18 (1998): Issue 3 (December 1998)

Volume 18 (1998): Issue 2 (August 1998)

Volume 18 (1998): Issue 1 (April 1998)

Volume 17 (1997): Issue 3 (December 1997)

Volume 17 (1997): Issue 2 (September 1997)

Volume 17 (1996): Issue 1 (December 1996)

Volume 16 (1995): Issue 4 (November 1995)

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Volume 16 (1994): Issue 2 (June 1994)

Volume 16 (1994): Issue 1 (May 1994)

Volume 15 (1992): Issue 3 (November 1992)

Volume 15 (1992): Issue 2 (April 1992)

Volume 15 (1991): Issue 1 (August 1991)

Volume 14 (1990): Issue 6 (June 1990)

Volume 14 (1989): Issue 5 (October 1989)

Volume 14 (1989): Issue 4 (February 1989)

Volume 14 (1989): Issue 3 (January 1989)

Volume 14 (1988): Issue 2 (October 1988)

Volume 14 (1987): Issue 1 (December 1987)

Volume 13 (1986): Issue 5 (December 1986)

Volume 13 (1986): Issue 4 (August 1986)

Volume 13 (1986): Issue 3 (July 1986)

Volume 13 (1985): Issue 2 (December 1985)

Volume 13 (1985): Issue 1 (January 1985)

Volume 12 (1984): Issue 5 (November 1984)

Volume 12 (1984): Issue 4 (July 1984)

Volume 12 (1984): Issue 3 (February 1984)

Volume 12 (1983): Issue 2 (June 1983)

Volume 12 (1983): Issue 1 (February 1983)

Volume 11 (1982): Issue 5 (November 1982)

Volume 11 (1982): Issue 4 (August 1982)

Volume 11 (1982): Issue 3 (January 1982)

Volume 11 (1981): Issue 2 (September 1981)

Volume 11 (1981): Issue 1 (March 1981)

Volume 10 (1980): Issue 3 (October 1980)

Volume 10 (1980): Issue 2 (July 1980)

Volume 10 (1979): Issue 1 (December 1979)

Volume 9 (1978): Issue 5 (December 1978)

Volume 9 (1978): Issue 4 (July 1978)

Volume 9 (1977): Issue 3 (October 1977)

Volume 9 (1977): Issue 2 (June 1977)

Volume 9 (1977): Issue 1 (April 1977)

Volume 8 (1976): Issue 7 (October 1976)

Volume 8 (1976): Issue 6 (June 1976)

Volume 8 (1976): Issue 5 (March 1976)

Volume 8 (1975): Issue 4 (December 1975)

Volume 8 (1975): Issue 3 (August 1975)

Volume 8 (1975): Issue 2 (May 1975)

Volume 8 (1975): Issue 1 (January 1975)

Volume 7 (1974): Issue 5 (September 1974)

Volume 7 (1974): Issue 4 (April 1974)

Volume 7 (1973): Issue 3 (November 1973)

Volume 7 (1973): Issue 2 (June 1973)

Volume 7 (1973): Issue 1 (January 1973)

Volume 6 (1972): Issue 5 (October 1972)

Volume 6 (1972): Issue 4 (August 1972)

Volume 6 (1972): Issue 3 (March 1972)

Volume 6 (1971): Issue 2 (September 1971)

Volume 6 (1971): Issue 1 (July 1971)

Volume 5 (1970): Issue 6 (December 1970)

Volume 5 (1970): Issue 5 (November 1970)

Volume 5 (1970): Issue 4 (August 1970)

Volume 5 (1969): Issue 3 (December 1969)

Volume 5 (1969): Issue 2 (August 1969)

Volume 5 (1969): Issue 1 (June 1969)

Volume 4 (1968): Issue 7 (December 1968)

Volume 4 (1968): Issue 6 (November 1968)

Volume 4 (1968): Issue 5 (July 1968)

Volume 4 (1968): Issue 4 (May 1968)

Volume 4 (1968): Issue 3 (February 1968)

Volume 4 (1967): Issue 2 (October 1967)

Volume 4 (1967): Issue 1 (August 1967)

Volume 3 (1966): Issue 9 (December 1966)

Volume 3 (1966): Issue 8 (December 1966)

Volume 3 (1966): Issue 7 (November 1966)

Volume 3 (1966): Issue 6 (September 1966)

Volume 3 (1966): Issue 5 (May 1966)

Volume 3 (1965): Issue 4 (October 1965)

Volume 3 (1965): Issue 3 (August 1965)

Volume 3 (1965): Issue 2 (May 1965)

Volume 3 (1965): Issue 1 (April 1965)

Volume 2 (1964): Issue 7 (November 1964)

Volume 2 (1964): Issue 6 (October 1964)

Volume 2 (1964): Issue 5 (May 1964)

Volume 2 (1964): Issue 4 (February 1964)

Volume 2 (1963): Issue 3 (October 1963)

Volume 2 (1963): Issue 2 (June 1963)

Volume 2 (1963): Issue 1 (March 1963)

Volume 1 (1962): Issue 10 (December 1962)

Volume 1 (1962): Issue 9 (December 1962)

Volume 1 (1962): Issue 8 (November 1962)

Volume 1 (1962): Issue 7 (November 1962)

Volume 1 (1962): Issue 6 (July 1962)

Volume 1 (1962): Issue 5 (February 1962)

Volume 1 (1961): Issue 4 (November 1961)

Volume 1 (1961): Issue 3 (August 1961)

Volume 1 (1961): Issue 2 (May 1961)

Volume 1 (1961): Issue 1 (January 1961)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2719-9509
First Published
01 Jan 1992
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 8 (1976): Issue 7 (October 1976)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2719-9509
First Published
01 Jan 1992
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

0 Articles
Open Access

The Measurement of Thiol Reactivity in Cigarette Smoke

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 399 - 403

Abstract

Abstract

An analytical method of establishing a quality index for fresh smoke is described. It is based on the reaction between cysteine and a number of smoke constituents such as oxides of nitrogen, aldehydes and unsaturated carbonyls. The method can be used for product screening, the measurement of filter performance, or for assessing tobacco quality.

Open Access

Analysis of Trends Concerning the Problem of Consumption of Nicotine and Smoke Condensate in the Federal Republic of Germany for the Period 1961 to 1975/Trendanalysen zum Problem des Verbrauches an Nikotin und Rauchkondensat in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland für die Jahre 1961 bis 1975

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 404 - 414

Abstract

Abstract

Numerous investigations and data on the development of smoke condensate and nicotine in German cigarettes, the changes in the market shares, the length of cigarettes smoked in laboratories and by the average consumer, and the per capita consumption of cigarettes in the Federal Republic of Germany were utilised in calculating the average delivery of smoke condensate and nicotine and for estimating the per capita consumption of moist and dry cigarette smoke condensate and the nicotine contained in it. In the period from 1961 to 1975 (for dry condensate figures are available only for 1966 to 1975) all these figures display a downward trend. Expressed in terms of the totaI population the reduction in moist condensate is about 31 %, nicotine about 40 % and dry condensate (for the shorter period 1966 to 1975) about 22 %. The percentages of smokers in the German population and among foreign workers, the development and age structure of the resident population and of the percentage of foreign workers were utilised to also ascertain from the above results the development of the condensate and nicotine consumption of the potentiaI and actual smokers. The result is again a reduction of consumption of approx. 36 % for moist condensate, of approx. 45 % for nicotine and 26 % for dry condensate (in the shorter period 1966 to 1975) a smoker. If these figures are converted to the equivalent of cigarettes of the type smoked in 1961 the consumption of 21 cigarettes a smoker established for 1975 corresponds to a mere 10 cigarettes of the type smoked in 1961. The actuaI daily consumption at that time, however, was about 15 cigarettes a smoker.

Open Access

The Characterization of Cigarette Smoke from Cytrel® Smoking Products and its Comparison to Smoke from Flue-Cured Tobacco: I. Vapour Phase Analysis

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 415 - 421

Abstract

Abstract

The vapour phase of smoke from cigarettes containing Cytrel has been extensively characterized and compared to that from identicaI cigarettes made from several blend levels of Cytrel and tobacco as well as those made from 100 % flue-cured tobacco. In only two instances out of sixty did 100 % Cytrel cigarettes deliver equivalent or greater amounts of any compound than did the corresponding tobacco cigarettes. For the remaining compounds reductions were observed in a predictable fashion for aII Cytrel-tobacco blend cigarettes examined. In the course of these analyses no compound was observed in smoke from Cytrel cigarettes that was not also present in tobacco smoke.

Open Access

The Characterization of Cigarette Smoke from Cytrel® Smoking Products and its Comparison to Smoke from Flue-Cured Tobacco: II. Semi-Volatile Phase Analysis

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 422 - 429

Abstract

Abstract

Major semi-volatile components from Cytrel cigarette smoke have been characterized and compared to the smoke from flue-cured tobacco cigarettes. Significantly greater numbers of cigarettes are required to produce the Cytrel scans due to the very low tar deliveries of these cigarettes. Even so, the CytreI scans are far simpler than those from tobacco-containing samples. Using triacetin delivered from the cigarette filters as an internal standard, numerical data have been derived to compare semi-volatile components from 100 % Cytrel with 100 % flue-cured tobacco and with a 50 % blend with tobacco on an approximately equal cigarette basis. Of the 128 semi-volatile components compared, 37 were found only in tobacco-containing samples and 66 others were present in significantly greater amounts in tobacco than in CytreI. No components were found in CytreI semi-volatiles that were not also present in tobacco smoke. GlyceroI, which is present in Cytrel smoke, does not appear in the 130°C semi-volatile fraction obtained by the capsule sampling technique.

Open Access

The Characterization of Cigarette Smoke from Cytrel® Smoking Products and its Comparison to Smoke from Flue-Cured Tobacco: III. Particulate Phase Analysis

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 430 - 437

Abstract

Abstract

The particulate phases delivered from cigarettes containing 100 % Cytrel, 100 % flue-cured tobacco, and blends of Cytrel and tobacco have been extensively characterized. Approximately 70 % of Cambridge particulate matter (CPM) from 100 % Cytrel cigarettes has been defined. A considerably smaller fraction of CPM from 100 % tobacco cigarettes has been similarly defined because of its greater complexity. Only two of the components observed in the particulate phase, glyceroI and possibly sodium, were delivered in higher amounts by 100 % Cytrel cigarettes than by 100 % tobacco cigarettes. For all other species deliveries were lower from 100 % Cytrel cigarettes. In cigarettes containing blends of Cytrel and tobacco the deliveries of alI components were shown to follow an approximately linear relationship with blend level.

Open Access

Methods for the Determination of Phytopharmaceuticals in Tobacco and Tobacco Products1st Report: On the Simultaneous Determination of Water-soluble Organophosphoric Pesticides/Methoden zur Bestimmung von Phytopharmaka in Tabak und Tabakerzeugnissen: I. Mitteilung: Zur Simultanbestimmung von wasserlöslichen Organophosphor-Pflanzenschutzmitteln

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 438 - 446

Abstract

Abstract

Sissons and Telling's (18) method for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble organophosphoric pesticides in vegetables has been successfully applied to tobacco. With this method monocrotophos, dicrotophos, dimethoate, formothion, methyl demeton-S-methyl, mevinphos, paraoxonmethyl, phosphamidon and trichlorphon can be quantitatively analysed speedily and with good recoveries.

Open Access

Methods for the Determination of Phytopharmaceuticals in Tobacco and Tobacco Products2nd Report: On the Simultaneous Determination of Hexane-soluble Organophosphoric Pesticides/Methoden zur Bestimmung von Phytopharmaka in Tabak und Tabakerzeugnissen: II. Mitteilung: Zur Simultanbestimmung von hexanIöslichen Organophosphor-Pflanzenschutzmitteln

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 447 - 454

Abstract

Abstract

With reference to a simultaneous determination of hexane-soluble organophosphoric phytopharmaceuticals in vegetables (1), a method for quantitatively analysing residues of chlorfenvinphos, fenitrothion, fenchlorphos, dimephenthoate, chlorpyriphos, parathion-methyl, parathion, phorate, phosvel, phosalone, ethoprophos, methidathion, salithion and tetrachlorvinphos in tobacco has been developed. Recoveries are between 75 % and 124 %, the detection Iimits between 0.01 ppm and 0.1 ppm.

Open Access

The Effect of the Economic Depression on the Length of Cigarette Butts in the Federal Republic of Germany/Die Auswirkung der wirtschaftlichen Rezession auf die Länge der Cigarettenstummel in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 455 - 458

Abstract

Abstract

The influence of the economic depression on the length of cigarette butts in the Federal Republic of Germany was investigated in the summer of 1974. After the interruption of the continual increase in the butt lengths of filter cigarettes and plain cigarettes by the tobacco tax rise on 1st September 1972, there was a further decrease in the butt lengths untiI August 1974. This was 0.44 mm for filter cigarettes and 1.5 mm for plain cigarettes. The lengths of butts discarded by smokers were on average

Open Access

On Units of Measurement for the Indication of Carbon Monoxide in Cigarette Smoke / Über Masseinheiten für die Angabe von Kohlenmonoxid in Cigarettenrauch

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 459 - 460

Abstract

Abstract

It is proposed to express carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke in ml CO/cigarette with 20°C as temperature of reference and 1.013 bar as pressure of reference.

0 Articles
Open Access

The Measurement of Thiol Reactivity in Cigarette Smoke

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 399 - 403

Abstract

Abstract

An analytical method of establishing a quality index for fresh smoke is described. It is based on the reaction between cysteine and a number of smoke constituents such as oxides of nitrogen, aldehydes and unsaturated carbonyls. The method can be used for product screening, the measurement of filter performance, or for assessing tobacco quality.

Open Access

Analysis of Trends Concerning the Problem of Consumption of Nicotine and Smoke Condensate in the Federal Republic of Germany for the Period 1961 to 1975/Trendanalysen zum Problem des Verbrauches an Nikotin und Rauchkondensat in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland für die Jahre 1961 bis 1975

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 404 - 414

Abstract

Abstract

Numerous investigations and data on the development of smoke condensate and nicotine in German cigarettes, the changes in the market shares, the length of cigarettes smoked in laboratories and by the average consumer, and the per capita consumption of cigarettes in the Federal Republic of Germany were utilised in calculating the average delivery of smoke condensate and nicotine and for estimating the per capita consumption of moist and dry cigarette smoke condensate and the nicotine contained in it. In the period from 1961 to 1975 (for dry condensate figures are available only for 1966 to 1975) all these figures display a downward trend. Expressed in terms of the totaI population the reduction in moist condensate is about 31 %, nicotine about 40 % and dry condensate (for the shorter period 1966 to 1975) about 22 %. The percentages of smokers in the German population and among foreign workers, the development and age structure of the resident population and of the percentage of foreign workers were utilised to also ascertain from the above results the development of the condensate and nicotine consumption of the potentiaI and actual smokers. The result is again a reduction of consumption of approx. 36 % for moist condensate, of approx. 45 % for nicotine and 26 % for dry condensate (in the shorter period 1966 to 1975) a smoker. If these figures are converted to the equivalent of cigarettes of the type smoked in 1961 the consumption of 21 cigarettes a smoker established for 1975 corresponds to a mere 10 cigarettes of the type smoked in 1961. The actuaI daily consumption at that time, however, was about 15 cigarettes a smoker.

Open Access

The Characterization of Cigarette Smoke from Cytrel® Smoking Products and its Comparison to Smoke from Flue-Cured Tobacco: I. Vapour Phase Analysis

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 415 - 421

Abstract

Abstract

The vapour phase of smoke from cigarettes containing Cytrel has been extensively characterized and compared to that from identicaI cigarettes made from several blend levels of Cytrel and tobacco as well as those made from 100 % flue-cured tobacco. In only two instances out of sixty did 100 % Cytrel cigarettes deliver equivalent or greater amounts of any compound than did the corresponding tobacco cigarettes. For the remaining compounds reductions were observed in a predictable fashion for aII Cytrel-tobacco blend cigarettes examined. In the course of these analyses no compound was observed in smoke from Cytrel cigarettes that was not also present in tobacco smoke.

Open Access

The Characterization of Cigarette Smoke from Cytrel® Smoking Products and its Comparison to Smoke from Flue-Cured Tobacco: II. Semi-Volatile Phase Analysis

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 422 - 429

Abstract

Abstract

Major semi-volatile components from Cytrel cigarette smoke have been characterized and compared to the smoke from flue-cured tobacco cigarettes. Significantly greater numbers of cigarettes are required to produce the Cytrel scans due to the very low tar deliveries of these cigarettes. Even so, the CytreI scans are far simpler than those from tobacco-containing samples. Using triacetin delivered from the cigarette filters as an internal standard, numerical data have been derived to compare semi-volatile components from 100 % Cytrel with 100 % flue-cured tobacco and with a 50 % blend with tobacco on an approximately equal cigarette basis. Of the 128 semi-volatile components compared, 37 were found only in tobacco-containing samples and 66 others were present in significantly greater amounts in tobacco than in CytreI. No components were found in CytreI semi-volatiles that were not also present in tobacco smoke. GlyceroI, which is present in Cytrel smoke, does not appear in the 130°C semi-volatile fraction obtained by the capsule sampling technique.

Open Access

The Characterization of Cigarette Smoke from Cytrel® Smoking Products and its Comparison to Smoke from Flue-Cured Tobacco: III. Particulate Phase Analysis

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 430 - 437

Abstract

Abstract

The particulate phases delivered from cigarettes containing 100 % Cytrel, 100 % flue-cured tobacco, and blends of Cytrel and tobacco have been extensively characterized. Approximately 70 % of Cambridge particulate matter (CPM) from 100 % Cytrel cigarettes has been defined. A considerably smaller fraction of CPM from 100 % tobacco cigarettes has been similarly defined because of its greater complexity. Only two of the components observed in the particulate phase, glyceroI and possibly sodium, were delivered in higher amounts by 100 % Cytrel cigarettes than by 100 % tobacco cigarettes. For all other species deliveries were lower from 100 % Cytrel cigarettes. In cigarettes containing blends of Cytrel and tobacco the deliveries of alI components were shown to follow an approximately linear relationship with blend level.

Open Access

Methods for the Determination of Phytopharmaceuticals in Tobacco and Tobacco Products1st Report: On the Simultaneous Determination of Water-soluble Organophosphoric Pesticides/Methoden zur Bestimmung von Phytopharmaka in Tabak und Tabakerzeugnissen: I. Mitteilung: Zur Simultanbestimmung von wasserlöslichen Organophosphor-Pflanzenschutzmitteln

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 438 - 446

Abstract

Abstract

Sissons and Telling's (18) method for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble organophosphoric pesticides in vegetables has been successfully applied to tobacco. With this method monocrotophos, dicrotophos, dimethoate, formothion, methyl demeton-S-methyl, mevinphos, paraoxonmethyl, phosphamidon and trichlorphon can be quantitatively analysed speedily and with good recoveries.

Open Access

Methods for the Determination of Phytopharmaceuticals in Tobacco and Tobacco Products2nd Report: On the Simultaneous Determination of Hexane-soluble Organophosphoric Pesticides/Methoden zur Bestimmung von Phytopharmaka in Tabak und Tabakerzeugnissen: II. Mitteilung: Zur Simultanbestimmung von hexanIöslichen Organophosphor-Pflanzenschutzmitteln

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 447 - 454

Abstract

Abstract

With reference to a simultaneous determination of hexane-soluble organophosphoric phytopharmaceuticals in vegetables (1), a method for quantitatively analysing residues of chlorfenvinphos, fenitrothion, fenchlorphos, dimephenthoate, chlorpyriphos, parathion-methyl, parathion, phorate, phosvel, phosalone, ethoprophos, methidathion, salithion and tetrachlorvinphos in tobacco has been developed. Recoveries are between 75 % and 124 %, the detection Iimits between 0.01 ppm and 0.1 ppm.

Open Access

The Effect of the Economic Depression on the Length of Cigarette Butts in the Federal Republic of Germany/Die Auswirkung der wirtschaftlichen Rezession auf die Länge der Cigarettenstummel in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 455 - 458

Abstract

Abstract

The influence of the economic depression on the length of cigarette butts in the Federal Republic of Germany was investigated in the summer of 1974. After the interruption of the continual increase in the butt lengths of filter cigarettes and plain cigarettes by the tobacco tax rise on 1st September 1972, there was a further decrease in the butt lengths untiI August 1974. This was 0.44 mm for filter cigarettes and 1.5 mm for plain cigarettes. The lengths of butts discarded by smokers were on average

Open Access

On Units of Measurement for the Indication of Carbon Monoxide in Cigarette Smoke / Über Masseinheiten für die Angabe von Kohlenmonoxid in Cigarettenrauch

Published Online: 14 Aug 2014
Page range: 459 - 460

Abstract

Abstract

It is proposed to express carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke in ml CO/cigarette with 20°C as temperature of reference and 1.013 bar as pressure of reference.