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SPECIAL ISSUE: ON THE VERY IDEA OF LOGICAL FORM

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SYMPOSIUM ON JASON STANLEY’S “HOW PROPAGANDA WORKS”

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XII Taller d'Investigació en Filosofia

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Petrus Hispanus 2009

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Détails du magazine
Format
Magazine
eISSN
2182-2875
Première publication
16 Apr 2017
Période de publication
4 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

Chercher

Volume 10 (2018): Edition 51 (December 2018)
SYMPOSIUM ON JASON STANLEY’S “HOW PROPAGANDA WORKS”

Détails du magazine
Format
Magazine
eISSN
2182-2875
Première publication
16 Apr 2017
Période de publication
4 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

Chercher

5 Articles
Accès libre

How Propaganda Works: An Introduction

Publié en ligne: 08 Dec 2020
Pages: 275 - 288

Résumé

Abstract

This is the editor’s introduction to the book symposium on Jason Stanley’s influential book How Propaganda Words (Oxford University Press, 2015). After a few brief remarks situating the book in the landscape of current analytic philosophy, I offer a detailed presentation of each chapter of the book, in order to familiarize the reader with its main tenets and with the author’s argumentative strategy. I flag the issues that the contributors to the symposium discuss, and describe their main points. I end with expressing hope that the symposium will help continue the conversation around ideology and propaganda within analytic philosophy.

Mots clés

  • Propaganda
  • analytic philosophy
  • ideology
  • democracy
  • silencing
Accès libre

The Worst and the Best of Propaganda

Publié en ligne: 08 Dec 2020
Pages: 289 - 303

Résumé

Abstract

In this paper we discuss two issues addressed by Jason Stanley in How Propaganda Works: the status of slurs (Section 1) and the notion of positive propaganda (Section 2). In particular, in Section 1 we argue contra Stanley that code words like ‘welfare’ are crucially different from slurs in that the association between the lexical item and an additional social meaning is not as systematic as it is for slurs. In this sense, slurs bring about a special kind of propagandistic effect, even if it typically concerns informal contexts rather than public debates. In Section 2, we consider positive propaganda and its relation to emotional effects. For Stanley, positive propaganda relies on the production of emotional effects, feature which risks to erode rational debates even if there is a good purpose behind. Instead, we argue that positive propaganda can work with no appeal to emotions. To this end, we focus on the use of ‘she’ as the default personal pronoun in academic writing and suggest that this measure can count as positive propaganda which rather than eroding rational debates by relying on emotional effects, closely resembles affirmative action aimed at counterbalancing a pre-existing form of injustice and inequality.

Mots clés

  • Slurs
  • code words
  • positive propaganda
  • affirmative action
Accès libre

The Empire Has No Clothes

Publié en ligne: 08 Dec 2020
Pages: 305 - 330

Résumé

Abstract

Jason Stanley’s How Propaganda Works roots the danger of undermining propaganda in an ideology based account of politics, treating individuals’ beliefs and social belief systems as the primary target and mechanism of undermining propaganda. In this paper I suggest a theoretical alternative to the role ideology plays in Stanley’s theory and theories like it, which I call practice first. A practice first account instead treats public behavior as the primary target of propaganda, and analyzes undermining propaganda as altering the incentive structure that sets the terms for public behavior.

Mots clés

  • Ideology
  • propaganda
  • practice first
  • common ground
  • incentive structure
Accès libre

Flawed Ideologies, Propaganda and the Social Situatedness of Knowledge

Publié en ligne: 08 Dec 2020
Pages: 331 - 344

Résumé

Abstract

In this paper I focus on the connection between some of Stanley’s claims about propaganda and flawed ideologies, and the idea of the social situatedness or perspective-relativity of knowledge. More precisely, I will try to show how Stanley’s reflections on the nature of propaganda and its relationship with flawed ideologies push us towards the empiricists’ characterisation of the social situatedness of knowledge. Not only do these reflections reveal some important weaknesses of standpoint theories (that is, the claim of epistemic asymmetry between advantaged and negatively advantaged groups, and the necessity of actively achieving a standpoint), but they also support the request for the pluralism, rational critique, cooperation, fair discussion and epistemic integration fostered by social empiricism. This means that the broad idea of the social situatedness of knowledge should be defended and further developed along the lines sketched by social empiricism.

Mots clés

  • Flawed ideologies
  • propaganda
  • social empiricism
  • social situatedness of knowledge
  • standpoint theories
Accès libre

Replies to Cepollaro and Torrengo, Táíwò, and Amoretti

Publié en ligne: 08 Dec 2020
Pages: 345 - 359

Résumé

Abstract

In this short piece belonging to a book symposium on my book How Propaganda Works (Oxford University Press, 2015), I reply to the objections, comments and suggestions provided by the contributors: Bianca Cepollaro and Giuliano Torrengo, Olúfémi O. Táíwò, and Maria Cristina Amoretti. I show how some of the objections can be accommodated by the framework adopted in the book, but also how various comments and suggestions have contributed to the development, in future work, of several threads pertaining to the general view put forward in How Propaganda Works.

Mots clés

  • Propaganda
  • ideology
  • slurs and code words
  • agenda setting
  • standpoint epistemology
5 Articles
Accès libre

How Propaganda Works: An Introduction

Publié en ligne: 08 Dec 2020
Pages: 275 - 288

Résumé

Abstract

This is the editor’s introduction to the book symposium on Jason Stanley’s influential book How Propaganda Words (Oxford University Press, 2015). After a few brief remarks situating the book in the landscape of current analytic philosophy, I offer a detailed presentation of each chapter of the book, in order to familiarize the reader with its main tenets and with the author’s argumentative strategy. I flag the issues that the contributors to the symposium discuss, and describe their main points. I end with expressing hope that the symposium will help continue the conversation around ideology and propaganda within analytic philosophy.

Mots clés

  • Propaganda
  • analytic philosophy
  • ideology
  • democracy
  • silencing
Accès libre

The Worst and the Best of Propaganda

Publié en ligne: 08 Dec 2020
Pages: 289 - 303

Résumé

Abstract

In this paper we discuss two issues addressed by Jason Stanley in How Propaganda Works: the status of slurs (Section 1) and the notion of positive propaganda (Section 2). In particular, in Section 1 we argue contra Stanley that code words like ‘welfare’ are crucially different from slurs in that the association between the lexical item and an additional social meaning is not as systematic as it is for slurs. In this sense, slurs bring about a special kind of propagandistic effect, even if it typically concerns informal contexts rather than public debates. In Section 2, we consider positive propaganda and its relation to emotional effects. For Stanley, positive propaganda relies on the production of emotional effects, feature which risks to erode rational debates even if there is a good purpose behind. Instead, we argue that positive propaganda can work with no appeal to emotions. To this end, we focus on the use of ‘she’ as the default personal pronoun in academic writing and suggest that this measure can count as positive propaganda which rather than eroding rational debates by relying on emotional effects, closely resembles affirmative action aimed at counterbalancing a pre-existing form of injustice and inequality.

Mots clés

  • Slurs
  • code words
  • positive propaganda
  • affirmative action
Accès libre

The Empire Has No Clothes

Publié en ligne: 08 Dec 2020
Pages: 305 - 330

Résumé

Abstract

Jason Stanley’s How Propaganda Works roots the danger of undermining propaganda in an ideology based account of politics, treating individuals’ beliefs and social belief systems as the primary target and mechanism of undermining propaganda. In this paper I suggest a theoretical alternative to the role ideology plays in Stanley’s theory and theories like it, which I call practice first. A practice first account instead treats public behavior as the primary target of propaganda, and analyzes undermining propaganda as altering the incentive structure that sets the terms for public behavior.

Mots clés

  • Ideology
  • propaganda
  • practice first
  • common ground
  • incentive structure
Accès libre

Flawed Ideologies, Propaganda and the Social Situatedness of Knowledge

Publié en ligne: 08 Dec 2020
Pages: 331 - 344

Résumé

Abstract

In this paper I focus on the connection between some of Stanley’s claims about propaganda and flawed ideologies, and the idea of the social situatedness or perspective-relativity of knowledge. More precisely, I will try to show how Stanley’s reflections on the nature of propaganda and its relationship with flawed ideologies push us towards the empiricists’ characterisation of the social situatedness of knowledge. Not only do these reflections reveal some important weaknesses of standpoint theories (that is, the claim of epistemic asymmetry between advantaged and negatively advantaged groups, and the necessity of actively achieving a standpoint), but they also support the request for the pluralism, rational critique, cooperation, fair discussion and epistemic integration fostered by social empiricism. This means that the broad idea of the social situatedness of knowledge should be defended and further developed along the lines sketched by social empiricism.

Mots clés

  • Flawed ideologies
  • propaganda
  • social empiricism
  • social situatedness of knowledge
  • standpoint theories
Accès libre

Replies to Cepollaro and Torrengo, Táíwò, and Amoretti

Publié en ligne: 08 Dec 2020
Pages: 345 - 359

Résumé

Abstract

In this short piece belonging to a book symposium on my book How Propaganda Works (Oxford University Press, 2015), I reply to the objections, comments and suggestions provided by the contributors: Bianca Cepollaro and Giuliano Torrengo, Olúfémi O. Táíwò, and Maria Cristina Amoretti. I show how some of the objections can be accommodated by the framework adopted in the book, but also how various comments and suggestions have contributed to the development, in future work, of several threads pertaining to the general view put forward in How Propaganda Works.

Mots clés

  • Propaganda
  • ideology
  • slurs and code words
  • agenda setting
  • standpoint epistemology

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