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Volume 41 (2022): Edition 2 (June 2022)

Volume 41 (2022): Edition 1 (March 2022)

Volume 40 (2021): Edition 4 (December 2021)

Volume 40 (2021): Edition 3 (September 2021)

Volume 40 (2021): Edition 2 (June 2021)

Volume 40 (2021): Edition 1 (March 2021)

Volume 39 (2020): Edition 4 (December 2020)

Volume 39 (2020): Edition 3 (September 2020)

Volume 39 (2020): Edition 2 (June 2020)

Volume 39 (2020): Edition 1 (March 2020)

Volume 38 (2019): Edition 4 (December 2019)

Volume 38 (2019): Edition 3 (September 2019)

Volume 38 (2019): Edition 2 (June 2019)

Volume 38 (2019): Edition 1 (March 2019)

Volume 37 (2018): Edition 4 (December 2018)

Volume 37 (2018): Edition 3 (September 2018)

Volume 37 (2018): Edition 2 (June 2018)

Volume 37 (2018): Edition 1 (March 2018)

Volume 36 (2017): Edition 4 (December 2017)

Volume 36 (2017): Edition 3 (September 2017)

Volume 36 (2017): Edition 2 (June 2017)

Volume 36 (2017): Edition 1 (March 2017)

Volume 35 (2016): Edition 4 (December 2016)

Volume 35 (2016): Edition 3 (September 2016)

Volume 35 (2016): Edition 2 (June 2016)

Volume 35 (2016): Edition 1 (March 2016)

Volume 34 (2015): Edition 4 (December 2015)

Volume 34 (2015): Edition 3 (September 2015)

Volume 34 (2015): Edition 2 (June 2015)

Volume 34 (2015): Edition 1 (March 2015)

Volume 33 (2014): Edition 4 (December 2014)

Volume 33 (2014): Edition 3 (September 2014)

Volume 33 (2014): Edition 2 (June 2014)

Volume 33 (2014): Edition 1 (March 2014)

Volume 32 (2013): Edition 4 (December 2013)

Volume 32 (2013): Edition 3 (September 2013)

Volume 32 (2013): Edition 2 (June 2013)

Volume 32 (2013): Edition 1 (March 2013)

Volume 31 (2012): Edition 4 (December 2012)

Volume 31 (2012): Edition 3 (October 2012)

Volume 31 (2012): Edition 2 (June 2012)

Volume 31 (2012): Edition 1 (March 2012)

Volume 30 (2011): Edition 4 (December 2011)

Volume 30 (2011): Edition 3 (September 2011)

Volume 30 (2011): Edition 2 (June 2011)

Volume 30 (2011): Edition 1 (March 2011)

Volume 29 (2010): Edition 4 (December 2010)

Volume 29 (2010): Edition 3 (September 2010)

Volume 29 (2010): Edition 2 (June 2010)

Volume 29 (2010): Edition 1 (March 2010)

Détails du magazine
Format
Magazine
eISSN
2081-6383
Première publication
01 Jun 1974
Période de publication
4 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

Chercher

Volume 40 (2021): Edition 2 (June 2021)

Détails du magazine
Format
Magazine
eISSN
2081-6383
Première publication
01 Jun 1974
Période de publication
4 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

Chercher

10 Articles
access type Accès libre

Coastal Regions of Russia: Migration Attractiveness and Innovation Performance

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 5 - 18

Résumé

Abstract

Coastalisation is a widely known concept that builds on the global urbanisation of the world's marine and ocean coasts. In this paper, the degree of coastalisation of the Russian regions is analysed using a variety of parameters, including population numbers and gross regional products, indicating the accumulation of human activity in the coastal regions against the less densely populated inland territories. This research shows that coastalisation is expected to continue, making coastal regions the most attractive for international and interregional migration, hence their high innovation performance. Based on the principles of human geography, we put forward the hypothesis that Russia's coastal territories are highly heterogeneous in their development dynamics. This study aims to test the interdependence between migration figures and innovation values across 23 regions of Russia with access to the sea. The research design comprises three stages: calculation of innovation performance, evaluation of migration flows and the building up of a typology of coastal regions. The research results reveal an increased migration attractiveness of the country's coastal regions, with the St. Petersburg and Kaliningrad agglomerations and the Black Sea coast of the Krasnodar Krai (region) as the main attractors. Intensive innovation activity is characteristic of St. Petersburg, the northern capital of Russia, whereas peripheral regions where the extractive industries dominate (the Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug (district), Kamchatka, Krasnoyarsk and Magadan regions) demonstrate a much weaker trend towards combining innovation performance and migration attractiveness.

Mots clés

  • coastalisation
  • coastal region
  • coastal migration
  • innovation activity
  • Russia
access type Accès libre

Migratory Outflow from Wrocław: Directions of Population Flows within the Framework of Internal Migration in the Period 2002–2018

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 19 - 33

Résumé

Abstract

In the majority of large cities in Poland there is a migration outflow, resulting mainly from suburbanisation processes. However, it should be noted that the inhabitants of large cities do not move exclusively to the suburban zone. The study below focuses on the migratory outflow of Wrocław residents. The authors characterise it by presenting the directions of population movements and determining their sustainability. The authors conclude that the target area of immigrants from Wrocław is mostly a suburban area, but there are also permanent migration flows to other rural communities in the voivodeship and other large cities in the country. The area of emigration itself goes beyond the scope of the voivodeship of which Wrocław is the capital.

Mots clés

  • migratory outflow
  • internal migration
  • counter-urbanisation
  • persistence of migration
  • Wrocław
access type Accès libre

Analysing (In)Justice in the Interplay of Urbanisation and Transport: The Case of Agrarian Extractivism in the Region of Urabá in Colombia

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 35 - 61

Résumé

Abstract

Infrastructural design, transport and mobility policies are strong instruments for interpreting historical urban and regional transformation processes. The paper addresses the intercausalities between both of them. To do so, it briefly sketches debates on the causalities of transport infrastructure and urbanisation and the theory of technological politics, drawing attention to the relationship between transport infrastructure and politics, and how infrastructures and their techno-political frames include means of power and authority. From there, the paper moves to the debate on the relationship between social justice and transport, showing how transport systems embody social processes and social (in)injustice. The history of agrarian extractivism in the region of Urabá in Colombia serves as a case study. The paper shows how existing transport networks of the region of Urabá have supported the expansion of agrarian extractivist industries and more specifically the production of transport (in)justice. It explores the development of the infrastructural network, transport systems and urbanisation of this region from the early 1900s onwards. Results show how the actual agrarian extractivist industries of the region are causing huge challenges related to the overlapping of transport scales, congestion and risks of accidents in urban areas, and how actual transport dynamics in the region are affecting urban development, generating a high segregation characterised by uneven distributions of public services and transport infrastructures. The paper reveals that the existing transport developments in the region of Urabá have no support for local development and are mainly thought for the efficiency of agrarian extractivist industries over local economic development. Agrarian extractivism has been a consistent factor in the economic, political and social spheres, and since colonial times the appropriation of natural resources and the dispossession of territories has been omnipresent. This paper explores the historical role of transport in agrarian extractivism, the long-term impact of the prolongation of old mechanisms, and the interrelations of the latter with current urbanisation and development. It concludes that infrastructural developments in this region have supported agrarian extractivist industries, first in colonial times, but also more recently, showing the deep embeddedness of the relation between mobility and urbanity in the (agrarian extractivist) development history of this region.

Mots clés

  • agrarian extractivism
  • transport (in)justice
  • institutionalism
  • transport infrastructure
  • urban development
  • Antioquia
  • Colombia
access type Accès libre

Natural Resources, Urbanisation, Economic Growth and the Ecological Footprint in South Africa: The Moderating Role of Human Capital

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 63 - 76

Résumé

Abstract

South Africa is the largest emitter of CO2 and arguably the most developed and urbanised country in Africa. The country currently harbours an ecological deficit territory which could be the outcome of economic expansion, urban explosion, unsustainable resource exploration and a low level of human development. After all, environmental distortions are mainly the outcome of human activities. This study is a maiden attempt to examine the linkage between urbanisation, human capital, natural resources (NR) and the ecological footprint (EF) in South Africa. Unlike previous studies, this study employs positivist and relevant environmental indicators that accommodate built-up land, forest land, carbon footprint, ocean, grazing land and cropland. Findings from the long-run results suggest that urbanisation, economic growth and NR increase the EF, whereas human capital ensures environmental sustainability. The interaction between urbanisation and human capital mitigates environmental degradation by reducing the EF. The canonical cointegrating regression (CCR), dynamic ordinary least squares (DOLS) and the fully modified ordinary least squares (FMOLS) results further confirm the nature of the relationships and linkages existing with respect to NR, urbanisation, economic growth and the EF. A bidirectional causality exists between human capital, economic growth and the EF. Policies related to NR and urban sustainability, the limitations of the study, as well as possible directions for future research are discussed.

Mots clés

  • urbanisation
  • natural resources
  • ecological footprint
  • human capital
  • South Africa
access type Accès libre

Nature-Based Tourism Motivations and Visit Profiles of Domestic and International Segments to a Japanese National Park

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 77 - 92

Résumé

Abstract

The rapid post-millennial internationalisation of Japan's tourism sector and the influx of international visitors have quickly increased visitor motivations’ heterogeneity, thereby posing challenges for management. Given the lack of prior research, we aimed to identify nature-based tourism (NBT) push-factor motivation domains of visitors in a Japanese national park and segment domestic and international visitors based on their motivations, demographics and trip profiles. Primary data collection of 137 responses took place in November 2019 through an on-site self-administered questionnaire. From 11 push-factor statements, the principal component analysis yielded a four-factor solution: ‘enjoying nature with family or friends’, ‘improving physical health’, ‘discovering and learning’ and ‘escaping’. In addition, t-tests revealed significant differences between domestic and international visitors in three out of the four motivation dimensions. Underlying visitor profiles could explain some such differences. Despite the differences, both international and domestic visitors share similar motivations regarding ‘improving physical health’. These findings hint at the complexity of monitoring heterogeneous visitor segments within Japanese NBT. Despite increasing international visitors, there has been a lack of the necessary infrastructure and facilities to accommodate them. Thus, this study's implications might help diversify NBT management strategies to deal with current shortcomings in Japan's tourism sector.

Mots clés

  • motivation
  • monitoring
  • nature-based tourism
  • international segments
  • national park
access type Accès libre

Sustainable Tourism as a Driving Force in Regional Development of Remote Regions in Siberia: An Integrated Operational Framework

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 93 - 108

Résumé

Abstract

Regional development based on sustainable tourism is one of the options of developing remote regions, which are usually disadvantaged due to their distance, but can have a certain competitive advantage based on their remoteness. The present paper offers in-depth analysis of the tourism potential in selected remote regions of Russia, the Altai Mountains and Lake Baikal with the aim to explore the specific features of their sustainable tourism development and to propose an integrated operational framework for sustainable tourism and regional development usable for similar regions across the world. The proposed integrated operational framework helps to achieve a tricky balance between economic resurrection of remote areas and environment conservation, which is possible only with the proper co-integration of tourists with the community, and local economic development with the environment. It presents a set of drivers and their mutual relations to achieve the successful sustainable tourism development in remote regions in Russia and across the world. The present research results contribute to a knowledge bank that could serve as a useful guide for academics and policymakers involved with sustainable development, geography or environmentally sensitive tourism.

Mots clés

  • sustainable tourism
  • regional development
  • participatory approach
  • integrated operational framework
access type Accès libre

Planning of the Interregional Tourist Route in the Urals

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 109 - 118

Résumé

Abstract

The article aims to attract the attention of geographers to the development of technology for the design of tourist routes. The world and Russian experience of designing long interregional tourist routes is considered. The authors’ approaches to route design are illustrated by the example of the Urals. Interregional tourist routes in Russia are actively developed with the support of the government. They are initiated by interacting regions and especially federal districts. Interregional routes are tours covering several adjacent regions or regions that are close not territorially, but thematically in tourist aspects. Such routes are quite different, but they have mainly cultural and informative goals as well as an excursion, transport and sometimes cruise style. Among all the interregional routes, the ‘Golden Ring’ and the ‘Volga-Kama’ river cruises are exemplary, among which the ‘Moskovskaya krugosvetka’ stands out due to the uniqueness of the ring shape of the route. The geographic features of the Urals are at the heart of the logical decisions for the preparation of the interregional tourist project ’The Great Ural Route’. The Urals have attractive, image, logistic and other opportunities for organising a large tourist route. A route should be developed for residents of the country and foreign guests, which will introduce the most striking and characteristic objects of the macro region as a whole. Moreover, the annular shape of the route is most preferred. It is advisable to lay the route in most of the Ural regions. It should include the main cities, landscapes of different natural zones, the most significant excursion sites and distinctive territories. Geographic route design technologies make it possible to make them relevant for a long time.

Mots clés

  • tourism
  • tourist itinerary
  • interregional routes
  • travel planning
  • route design
  • tourist cruises
  • Russia
  • Ural
access type Accès libre

Gendered and Gender-Neutral Character of Public Places in Algeria

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 119 - 137

Résumé

Abstract

This article aims to determine whether Algerian public spaces are gendered or gender neutral and to deduce the place of women in this type of hedonistic aesthetic consumption space. A non-probability sample of 363 individuals allowed us to collect the necessary data on the basis of an experiential scale designed for Algerian public spaces. This scale offers us the possibility of measuring their spatial and phenomenal experiential tendency. In other words, it allows us to evaluate the potential of their sensorial, relational, emotional, cognitive, behavioural spaces, their urban environments and their spirits of the place. This scale has undergone the tests of reliability and validity laid down by Churchill. It has also undergone the latest generation confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) method. Due to the non-normality of the sample distribution, we applied non-parametric tests in our analysis. The Mann Whitney U tests were used to calculate and compare the indices of spatial and phenomenal segregation of public places. The results revealed the gendered or gender-neutral nature of the three public places with their respective mapping. In the end, on the basis of the cultural dimensions of Hofstede, we were able to get to know the populations of the cities in our case studies that require urgent awareness-raising action. This promotes gender equality and especially the right of women to use and occupy hedonic public spaces without any conditions or prejudice.

Mots clés

  • public place
  • gendered space
  • gender-neutral space
  • experiential spaces
  • indices of spatial and phenomenal segregation
access type Accès libre

Urban Theatricalities, A Communicational Claim. Reading of the Scenic Performances of the City of Jijel (Algeria)

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 139 - 151

Résumé

Abstract

This article aims to analyse and interpret the structures responsible for the urban theatricality with deep claims of the city of Jijel (Algeria). It is through scenic readings of public space that this study explores the latent expressions of users as stage directors. This will be done mainly with observation supported by research interviews that combine qualitative and quantitative studies. The urban theatricalities studied in this paper are those unconscious, spontaneous and continual experiences that the actors of the urban scene use to make an urban spectacle. It is about the spectacle of daily life and scenic transcriptions of experiences. The results of this scenic reading of urban script allow us to understand the hidden expressions responsible for communicational theatrical structures.

Mots clés

  • urban theatricality
  • public space
  • communicational claims
  • staging
  • scenic performances
  • users as stage directors
access type Accès libre

Water Scarcity, Mountain Deforestation and the Economic Value of Water in a Small-Scale Irrigation System: A Case Study in East Java, Indonesia

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 153 - 166

Résumé

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify the willingness of farmers to pay for small-scale irrigation (SSI) and its determinants. Additionally, this study analysed the physical water availability in the study area using 16 years’ (2004–2019) historical data of streamflow, rainfall and forest cover change. A structured questionnaire was used to collect the data from 100 farmers. A contingent valuation method was employed to elicit farmers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for irrigation water. The results show that the average WTP of farmers is US$ 215.84/ha/year. It accounts for 20% of farm revenue and is almost 20 times the water fee in large-scale irrigation systems. The study area experienced significant deforestation in the last two decades suffering a decrease of 11.72% of forest cover. It decreases the amount of stored rainwater and decreases the streamflow causing water scarcity during the dry season. Farm size, farmer income, distance to a small dam and usage of water-pump are the significant determinants. The results indicate that water scarcity caused by poor infrastructure increases the economic value of water in a SSI system.

Mots clés

  • water scarcity
  • small-scale irrigation system
  • contingent valuation method
  • economic value of water
  • willingness to pay
10 Articles
access type Accès libre

Coastal Regions of Russia: Migration Attractiveness and Innovation Performance

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 5 - 18

Résumé

Abstract

Coastalisation is a widely known concept that builds on the global urbanisation of the world's marine and ocean coasts. In this paper, the degree of coastalisation of the Russian regions is analysed using a variety of parameters, including population numbers and gross regional products, indicating the accumulation of human activity in the coastal regions against the less densely populated inland territories. This research shows that coastalisation is expected to continue, making coastal regions the most attractive for international and interregional migration, hence their high innovation performance. Based on the principles of human geography, we put forward the hypothesis that Russia's coastal territories are highly heterogeneous in their development dynamics. This study aims to test the interdependence between migration figures and innovation values across 23 regions of Russia with access to the sea. The research design comprises three stages: calculation of innovation performance, evaluation of migration flows and the building up of a typology of coastal regions. The research results reveal an increased migration attractiveness of the country's coastal regions, with the St. Petersburg and Kaliningrad agglomerations and the Black Sea coast of the Krasnodar Krai (region) as the main attractors. Intensive innovation activity is characteristic of St. Petersburg, the northern capital of Russia, whereas peripheral regions where the extractive industries dominate (the Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug (district), Kamchatka, Krasnoyarsk and Magadan regions) demonstrate a much weaker trend towards combining innovation performance and migration attractiveness.

Mots clés

  • coastalisation
  • coastal region
  • coastal migration
  • innovation activity
  • Russia
access type Accès libre

Migratory Outflow from Wrocław: Directions of Population Flows within the Framework of Internal Migration in the Period 2002–2018

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 19 - 33

Résumé

Abstract

In the majority of large cities in Poland there is a migration outflow, resulting mainly from suburbanisation processes. However, it should be noted that the inhabitants of large cities do not move exclusively to the suburban zone. The study below focuses on the migratory outflow of Wrocław residents. The authors characterise it by presenting the directions of population movements and determining their sustainability. The authors conclude that the target area of immigrants from Wrocław is mostly a suburban area, but there are also permanent migration flows to other rural communities in the voivodeship and other large cities in the country. The area of emigration itself goes beyond the scope of the voivodeship of which Wrocław is the capital.

Mots clés

  • migratory outflow
  • internal migration
  • counter-urbanisation
  • persistence of migration
  • Wrocław
access type Accès libre

Analysing (In)Justice in the Interplay of Urbanisation and Transport: The Case of Agrarian Extractivism in the Region of Urabá in Colombia

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 35 - 61

Résumé

Abstract

Infrastructural design, transport and mobility policies are strong instruments for interpreting historical urban and regional transformation processes. The paper addresses the intercausalities between both of them. To do so, it briefly sketches debates on the causalities of transport infrastructure and urbanisation and the theory of technological politics, drawing attention to the relationship between transport infrastructure and politics, and how infrastructures and their techno-political frames include means of power and authority. From there, the paper moves to the debate on the relationship between social justice and transport, showing how transport systems embody social processes and social (in)injustice. The history of agrarian extractivism in the region of Urabá in Colombia serves as a case study. The paper shows how existing transport networks of the region of Urabá have supported the expansion of agrarian extractivist industries and more specifically the production of transport (in)justice. It explores the development of the infrastructural network, transport systems and urbanisation of this region from the early 1900s onwards. Results show how the actual agrarian extractivist industries of the region are causing huge challenges related to the overlapping of transport scales, congestion and risks of accidents in urban areas, and how actual transport dynamics in the region are affecting urban development, generating a high segregation characterised by uneven distributions of public services and transport infrastructures. The paper reveals that the existing transport developments in the region of Urabá have no support for local development and are mainly thought for the efficiency of agrarian extractivist industries over local economic development. Agrarian extractivism has been a consistent factor in the economic, political and social spheres, and since colonial times the appropriation of natural resources and the dispossession of territories has been omnipresent. This paper explores the historical role of transport in agrarian extractivism, the long-term impact of the prolongation of old mechanisms, and the interrelations of the latter with current urbanisation and development. It concludes that infrastructural developments in this region have supported agrarian extractivist industries, first in colonial times, but also more recently, showing the deep embeddedness of the relation between mobility and urbanity in the (agrarian extractivist) development history of this region.

Mots clés

  • agrarian extractivism
  • transport (in)justice
  • institutionalism
  • transport infrastructure
  • urban development
  • Antioquia
  • Colombia
access type Accès libre

Natural Resources, Urbanisation, Economic Growth and the Ecological Footprint in South Africa: The Moderating Role of Human Capital

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 63 - 76

Résumé

Abstract

South Africa is the largest emitter of CO2 and arguably the most developed and urbanised country in Africa. The country currently harbours an ecological deficit territory which could be the outcome of economic expansion, urban explosion, unsustainable resource exploration and a low level of human development. After all, environmental distortions are mainly the outcome of human activities. This study is a maiden attempt to examine the linkage between urbanisation, human capital, natural resources (NR) and the ecological footprint (EF) in South Africa. Unlike previous studies, this study employs positivist and relevant environmental indicators that accommodate built-up land, forest land, carbon footprint, ocean, grazing land and cropland. Findings from the long-run results suggest that urbanisation, economic growth and NR increase the EF, whereas human capital ensures environmental sustainability. The interaction between urbanisation and human capital mitigates environmental degradation by reducing the EF. The canonical cointegrating regression (CCR), dynamic ordinary least squares (DOLS) and the fully modified ordinary least squares (FMOLS) results further confirm the nature of the relationships and linkages existing with respect to NR, urbanisation, economic growth and the EF. A bidirectional causality exists between human capital, economic growth and the EF. Policies related to NR and urban sustainability, the limitations of the study, as well as possible directions for future research are discussed.

Mots clés

  • urbanisation
  • natural resources
  • ecological footprint
  • human capital
  • South Africa
access type Accès libre

Nature-Based Tourism Motivations and Visit Profiles of Domestic and International Segments to a Japanese National Park

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 77 - 92

Résumé

Abstract

The rapid post-millennial internationalisation of Japan's tourism sector and the influx of international visitors have quickly increased visitor motivations’ heterogeneity, thereby posing challenges for management. Given the lack of prior research, we aimed to identify nature-based tourism (NBT) push-factor motivation domains of visitors in a Japanese national park and segment domestic and international visitors based on their motivations, demographics and trip profiles. Primary data collection of 137 responses took place in November 2019 through an on-site self-administered questionnaire. From 11 push-factor statements, the principal component analysis yielded a four-factor solution: ‘enjoying nature with family or friends’, ‘improving physical health’, ‘discovering and learning’ and ‘escaping’. In addition, t-tests revealed significant differences between domestic and international visitors in three out of the four motivation dimensions. Underlying visitor profiles could explain some such differences. Despite the differences, both international and domestic visitors share similar motivations regarding ‘improving physical health’. These findings hint at the complexity of monitoring heterogeneous visitor segments within Japanese NBT. Despite increasing international visitors, there has been a lack of the necessary infrastructure and facilities to accommodate them. Thus, this study's implications might help diversify NBT management strategies to deal with current shortcomings in Japan's tourism sector.

Mots clés

  • motivation
  • monitoring
  • nature-based tourism
  • international segments
  • national park
access type Accès libre

Sustainable Tourism as a Driving Force in Regional Development of Remote Regions in Siberia: An Integrated Operational Framework

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 93 - 108

Résumé

Abstract

Regional development based on sustainable tourism is one of the options of developing remote regions, which are usually disadvantaged due to their distance, but can have a certain competitive advantage based on their remoteness. The present paper offers in-depth analysis of the tourism potential in selected remote regions of Russia, the Altai Mountains and Lake Baikal with the aim to explore the specific features of their sustainable tourism development and to propose an integrated operational framework for sustainable tourism and regional development usable for similar regions across the world. The proposed integrated operational framework helps to achieve a tricky balance between economic resurrection of remote areas and environment conservation, which is possible only with the proper co-integration of tourists with the community, and local economic development with the environment. It presents a set of drivers and their mutual relations to achieve the successful sustainable tourism development in remote regions in Russia and across the world. The present research results contribute to a knowledge bank that could serve as a useful guide for academics and policymakers involved with sustainable development, geography or environmentally sensitive tourism.

Mots clés

  • sustainable tourism
  • regional development
  • participatory approach
  • integrated operational framework
access type Accès libre

Planning of the Interregional Tourist Route in the Urals

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 109 - 118

Résumé

Abstract

The article aims to attract the attention of geographers to the development of technology for the design of tourist routes. The world and Russian experience of designing long interregional tourist routes is considered. The authors’ approaches to route design are illustrated by the example of the Urals. Interregional tourist routes in Russia are actively developed with the support of the government. They are initiated by interacting regions and especially federal districts. Interregional routes are tours covering several adjacent regions or regions that are close not territorially, but thematically in tourist aspects. Such routes are quite different, but they have mainly cultural and informative goals as well as an excursion, transport and sometimes cruise style. Among all the interregional routes, the ‘Golden Ring’ and the ‘Volga-Kama’ river cruises are exemplary, among which the ‘Moskovskaya krugosvetka’ stands out due to the uniqueness of the ring shape of the route. The geographic features of the Urals are at the heart of the logical decisions for the preparation of the interregional tourist project ’The Great Ural Route’. The Urals have attractive, image, logistic and other opportunities for organising a large tourist route. A route should be developed for residents of the country and foreign guests, which will introduce the most striking and characteristic objects of the macro region as a whole. Moreover, the annular shape of the route is most preferred. It is advisable to lay the route in most of the Ural regions. It should include the main cities, landscapes of different natural zones, the most significant excursion sites and distinctive territories. Geographic route design technologies make it possible to make them relevant for a long time.

Mots clés

  • tourism
  • tourist itinerary
  • interregional routes
  • travel planning
  • route design
  • tourist cruises
  • Russia
  • Ural
access type Accès libre

Gendered and Gender-Neutral Character of Public Places in Algeria

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 119 - 137

Résumé

Abstract

This article aims to determine whether Algerian public spaces are gendered or gender neutral and to deduce the place of women in this type of hedonistic aesthetic consumption space. A non-probability sample of 363 individuals allowed us to collect the necessary data on the basis of an experiential scale designed for Algerian public spaces. This scale offers us the possibility of measuring their spatial and phenomenal experiential tendency. In other words, it allows us to evaluate the potential of their sensorial, relational, emotional, cognitive, behavioural spaces, their urban environments and their spirits of the place. This scale has undergone the tests of reliability and validity laid down by Churchill. It has also undergone the latest generation confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) method. Due to the non-normality of the sample distribution, we applied non-parametric tests in our analysis. The Mann Whitney U tests were used to calculate and compare the indices of spatial and phenomenal segregation of public places. The results revealed the gendered or gender-neutral nature of the three public places with their respective mapping. In the end, on the basis of the cultural dimensions of Hofstede, we were able to get to know the populations of the cities in our case studies that require urgent awareness-raising action. This promotes gender equality and especially the right of women to use and occupy hedonic public spaces without any conditions or prejudice.

Mots clés

  • public place
  • gendered space
  • gender-neutral space
  • experiential spaces
  • indices of spatial and phenomenal segregation
access type Accès libre

Urban Theatricalities, A Communicational Claim. Reading of the Scenic Performances of the City of Jijel (Algeria)

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 139 - 151

Résumé

Abstract

This article aims to analyse and interpret the structures responsible for the urban theatricality with deep claims of the city of Jijel (Algeria). It is through scenic readings of public space that this study explores the latent expressions of users as stage directors. This will be done mainly with observation supported by research interviews that combine qualitative and quantitative studies. The urban theatricalities studied in this paper are those unconscious, spontaneous and continual experiences that the actors of the urban scene use to make an urban spectacle. It is about the spectacle of daily life and scenic transcriptions of experiences. The results of this scenic reading of urban script allow us to understand the hidden expressions responsible for communicational theatrical structures.

Mots clés

  • urban theatricality
  • public space
  • communicational claims
  • staging
  • scenic performances
  • users as stage directors
access type Accès libre

Water Scarcity, Mountain Deforestation and the Economic Value of Water in a Small-Scale Irrigation System: A Case Study in East Java, Indonesia

Publié en ligne: 30 Jun 2021
Pages: 153 - 166

Résumé

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify the willingness of farmers to pay for small-scale irrigation (SSI) and its determinants. Additionally, this study analysed the physical water availability in the study area using 16 years’ (2004–2019) historical data of streamflow, rainfall and forest cover change. A structured questionnaire was used to collect the data from 100 farmers. A contingent valuation method was employed to elicit farmers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for irrigation water. The results show that the average WTP of farmers is US$ 215.84/ha/year. It accounts for 20% of farm revenue and is almost 20 times the water fee in large-scale irrigation systems. The study area experienced significant deforestation in the last two decades suffering a decrease of 11.72% of forest cover. It decreases the amount of stored rainwater and decreases the streamflow causing water scarcity during the dry season. Farm size, farmer income, distance to a small dam and usage of water-pump are the significant determinants. The results indicate that water scarcity caused by poor infrastructure increases the economic value of water in a SSI system.

Mots clés

  • water scarcity
  • small-scale irrigation system
  • contingent valuation method
  • economic value of water
  • willingness to pay

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