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Informacje o czasopiśmie
Format
Czasopismo
eISSN
2183-3311
Pierwsze wydanie
15 Dec 2016
Częstotliwość wydawania
1 raz w roku
Języki
Angielski

Wyszukiwanie

Tom 11 (2017): Zeszyt 1 (October 2017)

Informacje o czasopiśmie
Format
Czasopismo
eISSN
2183-3311
Pierwsze wydanie
15 Dec 2016
Częstotliwość wydawania
1 raz w roku
Języki
Angielski

Wyszukiwanie

5 Artykułów
access type Otwarty dostęp

Le symbolisme des jeux chez Filippo Picinelli

Data publikacji: 21 Oct 2017
Zakres stron: 1 - 52

Abstrakt

access type Otwarty dostęp

Theory of the introduction of Shogi via Southeast Asia: Viewed from the forms of Makruk pieces—Study of the reversing of promoted Bia pieces

Data publikacji: 21 Oct 2017
Zakres stron: 53 - 71

Abstrakt

access type Otwarty dostęp

A Note On Chess In 19th Century Turkestan

Data publikacji: 21 Oct 2017
Zakres stron: 73 - 82

Abstrakt

Abstract

A note by A. Chernevski in the 1877 Shakhmatny Listok described two chess variants played in Samarkand, present-day Uzbekistan. One, the “Bukharan game”, is a slightly modified version of shatranj, similar to Rumi chess as described in Murray’s History of Chess. The other, the “Persian game with a queen” resembles to some extent the Persian chess described in 1846 in the Chess Player’s Chronicle but differs from it in several important aspects. Chernevski’s information, which includes recorded games by native players, is absent from later sources on chess history. A summary of Chernevski’s report is provided, with a discussion of several other historical chess variants, and various errors that have crept into their description in the literature.

Słowa kluczowe

  • Chess history
  • chess variants
  • Asia
access type Otwarty dostęp

Pente Grammai and the ‘Holy Line’

Data publikacji: 21 Oct 2017
Zakres stron: 83 - 99

Abstrakt

Abstract

A great deal of the literary evidence surrounding the ancient Greek board game pente grammai has to do with its central and proverbial ‘holy line’. Although it seems that the goal of the game was to reach this holy line, the proverb always refers to ‘moving away from’ this holy line not toward it. But why would players move away from the line which is the goal? This paper argues that there was a strategic element to the game: just like in modern backgammon and in Zeno’s ‘table’ game from late antiquity, in pente grammai a player could knock an opponent’s ‘blots’ (azuges) off the board. This explains why a player might make the odd move of leaving the holy line: the aggressive and risky act might bring an advantage if the opponent has left a number of vulnerable pieces exposed. At the end, a possible reconstruction of the game is offered.

access type Otwarty dostęp

Stranger Games: The life and times of the spintriae

Data publikacji: 21 Oct 2017
Zakres stron: 101 - 121

Abstrakt

Abstract

In 2010 a Roman token was discovered in the mud of the Thames near Putney Bridge in London. When the token was discovered to have an erotic image on one side and a Roman numeral on the other, and was identified in a Museum of London press release as a rare Roman “brothel token”, the press reported on the story in the expected manner, for example: “A Roman coin that was probably used by soldiers to pay for sex in brothels has been discovered on the banks of the River Thames” (Daily Telegraph, 4 Jan 2012) and “Bronze discs depicting sex acts, like the one discovered in London, were used to hire prostitutes-and directly led to the birth of pornography during the Renaissance” (The Guardian, 4 Jan 2012). Even before this particular spate of media interest, these curious tokens have generated confusion, speculation and prurience-often simultaneously. They are of interest to games scholars because the speculation often includes the suggestion these objects may have had a ludic function, and were used as game counters. This paper will look at some of the proposals that have been offered by way of explanation of these peculiar objects.

5 Artykułów
access type Otwarty dostęp

Le symbolisme des jeux chez Filippo Picinelli

Data publikacji: 21 Oct 2017
Zakres stron: 1 - 52

Abstrakt

access type Otwarty dostęp

Theory of the introduction of Shogi via Southeast Asia: Viewed from the forms of Makruk pieces—Study of the reversing of promoted Bia pieces

Data publikacji: 21 Oct 2017
Zakres stron: 53 - 71

Abstrakt

access type Otwarty dostęp

A Note On Chess In 19th Century Turkestan

Data publikacji: 21 Oct 2017
Zakres stron: 73 - 82

Abstrakt

Abstract

A note by A. Chernevski in the 1877 Shakhmatny Listok described two chess variants played in Samarkand, present-day Uzbekistan. One, the “Bukharan game”, is a slightly modified version of shatranj, similar to Rumi chess as described in Murray’s History of Chess. The other, the “Persian game with a queen” resembles to some extent the Persian chess described in 1846 in the Chess Player’s Chronicle but differs from it in several important aspects. Chernevski’s information, which includes recorded games by native players, is absent from later sources on chess history. A summary of Chernevski’s report is provided, with a discussion of several other historical chess variants, and various errors that have crept into their description in the literature.

Słowa kluczowe

  • Chess history
  • chess variants
  • Asia
access type Otwarty dostęp

Pente Grammai and the ‘Holy Line’

Data publikacji: 21 Oct 2017
Zakres stron: 83 - 99

Abstrakt

Abstract

A great deal of the literary evidence surrounding the ancient Greek board game pente grammai has to do with its central and proverbial ‘holy line’. Although it seems that the goal of the game was to reach this holy line, the proverb always refers to ‘moving away from’ this holy line not toward it. But why would players move away from the line which is the goal? This paper argues that there was a strategic element to the game: just like in modern backgammon and in Zeno’s ‘table’ game from late antiquity, in pente grammai a player could knock an opponent’s ‘blots’ (azuges) off the board. This explains why a player might make the odd move of leaving the holy line: the aggressive and risky act might bring an advantage if the opponent has left a number of vulnerable pieces exposed. At the end, a possible reconstruction of the game is offered.

access type Otwarty dostęp

Stranger Games: The life and times of the spintriae

Data publikacji: 21 Oct 2017
Zakres stron: 101 - 121

Abstrakt

Abstract

In 2010 a Roman token was discovered in the mud of the Thames near Putney Bridge in London. When the token was discovered to have an erotic image on one side and a Roman numeral on the other, and was identified in a Museum of London press release as a rare Roman “brothel token”, the press reported on the story in the expected manner, for example: “A Roman coin that was probably used by soldiers to pay for sex in brothels has been discovered on the banks of the River Thames” (Daily Telegraph, 4 Jan 2012) and “Bronze discs depicting sex acts, like the one discovered in London, were used to hire prostitutes-and directly led to the birth of pornography during the Renaissance” (The Guardian, 4 Jan 2012). Even before this particular spate of media interest, these curious tokens have generated confusion, speculation and prurience-often simultaneously. They are of interest to games scholars because the speculation often includes the suggestion these objects may have had a ludic function, and were used as game counters. This paper will look at some of the proposals that have been offered by way of explanation of these peculiar objects.

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