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Volume 15 (2021): Issue 1 (December 2021)

Volume 14 (2020): Issue 1 (December 2020)

Volume 13 (2019): Issue 1 (December 2019)

Volume 12 (2018): Issue 1 (December 2018)

Volume 11 (2017): Issue 1 (December 2017)

Volume 10 (2016): Issue 1 (December 2016)

Volume 9 (2015): Issue 1 (January 2015)
Special Issue Title: International Conference on the Conservation of the Lesser Spotted Eagle, Košická Belá, Slovakia, 2014

Volume 8 (2014): Issue 2014 (January 2014)
Proceedings from VII. International Conference on the Conservation of the Eastern Imperial Eagle, Bratislava, Slovakia, 2013

Volume 8 (2014): Issue 2 (December 2014)

Volume 7 (2013): Issue 2013 (January 2013)

Volume 6 (2012): Issue 2012 (January 2012)

Volume 5 (2011): Issue 2011 (January 2011)

Volume 4 (2010): Issue 2010 (January 2010)

Volume 3 (2009): Issue 2009 (January 2009)

Volume 2 (2008): Issue 2008 (January 2008)

Volume 1 (2007): Issue 2007 (January 2007)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2644-5247
ISSN
1337-3463
First Published
09 Nov 2012
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 7 (2013): Issue 2013 (January 2013)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2644-5247
ISSN
1337-3463
First Published
09 Nov 2012
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English

Search

9 Articles
access type Open Access

Occurrence of the griffon vulture Gyps fulvus and the black vulture Aegypius monachus in central europe in the 21st century

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 1 - 16

Abstract

Abstract

The paper presents an overview of the occurrence of two vulture species: the griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) and the black vulture (Aegypius monachus) in Central Europe in the 21 st century. The number of records of griffon vultures has been increasing in recent years. After a first peak in the year 2007, the number of records has been steadily increasing again since 201 0. In some years (especially 2007 and 201 2) the occurrences showed the characteristics of an influx, similar to the development in Western and Western-Central Europe. In addition, this period coincides with changes in European sanitary legislation affecting the availability of livestock carcasses. Most of the records come from the summer months. It is likely that the increased occurrence is a result of increasing populations in South-Eastern but also in South-Western Europe, as well as being influenced by food shortages in south-western populations (mainly Spain). Both of these regions can be considered as likely origins of the birds observed in Eastern-Central Europe. The number of records of black vultures do not show a similar pattern, although there are indications that birds from the reintroduced population in central France also turn up as far afield as Eastern Europe.

Keywords

  • faunistics
  • expansion
  • influx description
  • Austria
  • the Czech Republic
  • Hungary
  • Poland
  • Slovakia
  • western Ukraine
access type Open Access

Colour ringing programme of the lesser spotted eagle (Aquila pomarina) population in Slovakia and its new results in the period 2009–2012

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 17 - 36

Abstract

Abstract

In the years 2009-2012 a total of 316 individuals were marked in a colour ringing programme of the population ofA. pomarina in Slovakia. From this a total of 39 inds. were ringed with yellow readable plastic rings with a two-place alphanumeric code (all young in a nest) and 277 inds. (273 young and 4 adult inds.) with light-blue rings. For the entire period of the programme of marking the A. pomarina population in Slovakia in the years 2000-2012 a total of 952 inds. were ringed, 933 of which were young birds in nest and 19 adult individuals. In the period 2009-2012 48 records were obtained from observations of 35 individuals of different age categories (31 individuals from one to 11 years old, three of unknown age and one young individual about one month after fledging the nest). The age categories of immature individuals were determined, and six were found to be one-year-old individuals (12.5%) in the second calendar year of life after their first return from wintering grounds, six were two-year-old eagles (12.5%) and five were three-year-old eagles (10.4%) which spent breeding periods in Europe at a relatively small distance from their place of hatching. Adult individuals were found to be in their current breeding grounds at distances of 8-249 km from their hatching place. In the period 2000-2012 three individuals were recorded 3× and four individuals 2×. The results confirm breeding site fidelity in adults, but also the fidelity of immature individuals to their hatching place, and the return of one-year-old individuals from their wintering grounds to the vicinity of their hatching place immediately in the first year of life (that is, in the second calendar year).

Keywords

  • colour rings
  • recovery rate
  • resighting rate
  • nest site fidelity
  • age categories
  • occurrence of immature individuals
access type Open Access

Abundance of raptors and habitat preferences of the common buzzard Buteo buteo and the common kestrel Falco tinnunculus during the non-breeding season in an agricultural landscape (Western Slovakia)

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 37 - 42

Abstract

Abstract

Habitat use and preferences by raptors were studied during three non-breeding seasons (2011-201 3) in an agricultural landscape in western Slovakia. The non-breeding season on agricultural land showed high variation and changes in the cover of habitats related to human activities. The most abundant raptor species were the common buzzard Buteo buteo (L.) (1 52 individuals) and the common kestrel Falco tinnunculus (L.) (78 individuals). The common buzzard preferred alfalfa and avoided ploughed fields. The common kestrel showed a high habitat preference for alfalfa, corn fields, stubbles and fallow. It also avoided ploughed fields and wheat.

Keywords

  • landscape
  • agricultural land
access type Open Access

Movements of a juvenile red kite Milvus milvus in the border zone of Aaustria, Slovakia and the Czech Republic

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 43 - 48

Abstract

Abstract

One juvenile female red kite was tracked during 2011-2013. The bird was tagged with a leg-mount radio transmitter in a nest in the Záhorská nížina Lowland in western Slovakia. Movements were monitored in the natal area and in the temporary settlement area (TSA). These areas were 40 km apart. The location of the TSA in the border zone ofAustria, Slovakia and the Czech Republic confirmed information about the wintering of local birds in the region. The temporary settlement area (MCP = 402.0 km2, 95% FKP = 622.8 km2, 50% FKP = 68.6 km2) was mainly situated in Austria. The natal area was significantly smaller (MCP = 34.7 km2, 95% FKP = 32.3 km2, 50% FKP = 5.0 km2). The juvenile hunted an average of 12.5 km from the communal roost place.

Keywords

  • telemetry
  • wintering
  • roost place
  • temporary settlement area
access type Open Access

Communal roosting and the seasonal dynamics of the hen harrier Circus cyaneus in the Záhorie region

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 49 - 58

Abstract

Abstract

A count of hen harriers Circus cyaneus was carried out at roost sites in south-western Slovakia from 1 992-2013. The number of sites and also the frequency of survey visits were different in different years. A total of 1 03 counts were carried out. Hen harriers were not seen roosting at the sites in 13 cases. In all, 10 localities with 14 roost sites were checked. Hen harriers roosted in sedge (5) or in ruderal associations (6) and meadows (3). A total of 634 individuals were recorded roosting. There were 483 brown birds (adult females and immature birds in the first calendar year) and 151 grey birds (males in the second calendar year and older). The average number of hen harriers at the roost sites ranged from 3 to 9 individual birds. The maximum number was at least 27 individuals (December 15, 2011 ; a minimum of 18 brown birds and 9 grey birds, Moravský Svätý Ján, Pacitov locality). The percentage of roosting males was 23.76%. The time period of roosting was also recorded. The last individuals were observed flying over the site from six minutes before sunset to 40 minutes after sunset. The average time of the last observation was approximately 1 7 minutes after sunset. The average luminosity at the last observation of an active individual bird was 28 lux. Hen harriers migrate from October to March in the study area. Occurrences in September, respectively in April and May, were very rare. Most registration and the highest number of individual birds were recorded in October, but especially in December and February.

Keywords

  • winter roost
  • crepuscular activity
access type Open Access

Diet of the ural owl (Strix uralensis) in Slovakia

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 59 - 71

Abstract

Abstract

A Central European subspecies of the Ural owl Strix uralensis macroura (Wolf, 1810) is widespread in the territory of Slovakia. The work presents unpublished data on the diet of this subspecies from several territorial units of eastern and northern Slovakia, obtained from pellets and the nest linings in boxes (1 ,564 pieces). There is less data about prey brought to young in the nest but still not yet consumed (137 pieces). Published data from analysis of the stomachs of dead and shot owls come from the first six decades of the 20th century. Together with existing published data, 2,134 pieces of the diet of S. uralensis from Slovakia are evaluated. They indicate the dominance of non-forest species Microtus arvalis and a more plentiful representation of larger species of prey: Lepus europaeus, Sciurus vulgaris and Corvus sp. In upper Orava the diet of young S. uralensis also consists of frogs Rana temporaria, moles Talpa europaea and mountain species of rodents: Microtus agrestis, M. subterraneus, Sicista betulina and Arvicola amphibius. In data from the mountains of central Slovakia the Clethrionomys glareolus has high abundance, and in eastern Slovakia the Apodemus flavicollis and A. agrarius are more represented, and in the lowlands also the Cricetus cricetus. Upon evaluation ofmaterial from the entire breeding grounds of S. uralensis it can be deduced that the basic diet consist of mammals (88.6%) from the orders Soricomorpha and Rodentia. In the countries of Central Europe the species M. arvalis, M. subterraneus, A. flavicollis and Muscardinus avellanarius are more abundantly represented, and in the Baltic states the species Sorex araneus, M. agrestis, M. oeconomus and M. rossiaemeridionalis. The species S. betulina and A. agrarius occur in the diet of S. uralensis from Central Europe up through the Far East.

Keywords

  • food ecology
  • pellets
  • prey in nests
access type Open Access

Nesting and non-nesting occurrence of the short-eared owl Asio flammeus in the Záhorie region (SW Slovakia)

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 73 - 80

Abstract

Abstract

The short-eared owl is a regular migrant and hibernant in the Záhorie region (SW Slovakia), though this species mostly escapes attention. In 1998 the species was found nesting in this region, and in 2012 individuals showing territorial behaviour were regularly observed, with high probability of nesting. Nesting habitats were localities with a high representation of meadows, corresponding to the preferred nesting sites in Slovakia. The foraging range of wintering birds was comparable with those from neighbouring regions (W Slovakia, Hungary), but with a higher number of harvest mice Micromys minutus and long-tailed field mice Apodemus sylvaticus. In both years when the nesting of birds was recorded, snowfall was significantly lower. Food sources were not monitored at these localities.

Keywords

  • snow cover
  • wintering
  • nesting
  • diet
  • Natura 2000
access type Open Access

Young of the common buzzard (Buteo buteo) reared by lesser spotted eagles (Aquila pomarina) in natural conditions in Slovakia

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 81 - 84

Abstract

Abstract

Since 2005 a breeding pair of A. pomarina has been observed near the village of Drienovec, Košice-Environs district, eastern Slovakia. Since 2009 occupied nests have been found each year with the subject pair. In the years 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2013 this pair successfully reared one young A. pomarina, but in 2012 they reared two B. buteo young during the nesting period in natural conditions and without the intervention of human beings. This is the first such documented case in the entire breeding grounds ofA. pomarina.

Keywords

  • breeding ecology
  • foster parents
  • nesting behaviour
  • unusual breeding
access type Open Access

Hunting in the dark by a peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus)

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 85 - 87

Abstract

Abstract

A peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) was observed preying on a mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) in Hokkaido, northern Japan, before dawn. The observation was made on 13 January 2013 about 40 minutes before sunrise, in the dark. Although there were sparse street lamps and car traffic nearby the observation point, it is not as evenly and continuously well-lit as urban areas. This suggests the potential of peregrine falcon to forage successfully in non-urban habitat under low light conditions.

Keywords

  • visual predator
  • low-light condition
  • dawn
  • nocturnal
  • non-urban habitat
9 Articles
access type Open Access

Occurrence of the griffon vulture Gyps fulvus and the black vulture Aegypius monachus in central europe in the 21st century

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 1 - 16

Abstract

Abstract

The paper presents an overview of the occurrence of two vulture species: the griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) and the black vulture (Aegypius monachus) in Central Europe in the 21 st century. The number of records of griffon vultures has been increasing in recent years. After a first peak in the year 2007, the number of records has been steadily increasing again since 201 0. In some years (especially 2007 and 201 2) the occurrences showed the characteristics of an influx, similar to the development in Western and Western-Central Europe. In addition, this period coincides with changes in European sanitary legislation affecting the availability of livestock carcasses. Most of the records come from the summer months. It is likely that the increased occurrence is a result of increasing populations in South-Eastern but also in South-Western Europe, as well as being influenced by food shortages in south-western populations (mainly Spain). Both of these regions can be considered as likely origins of the birds observed in Eastern-Central Europe. The number of records of black vultures do not show a similar pattern, although there are indications that birds from the reintroduced population in central France also turn up as far afield as Eastern Europe.

Keywords

  • faunistics
  • expansion
  • influx description
  • Austria
  • the Czech Republic
  • Hungary
  • Poland
  • Slovakia
  • western Ukraine
access type Open Access

Colour ringing programme of the lesser spotted eagle (Aquila pomarina) population in Slovakia and its new results in the period 2009–2012

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 17 - 36

Abstract

Abstract

In the years 2009-2012 a total of 316 individuals were marked in a colour ringing programme of the population ofA. pomarina in Slovakia. From this a total of 39 inds. were ringed with yellow readable plastic rings with a two-place alphanumeric code (all young in a nest) and 277 inds. (273 young and 4 adult inds.) with light-blue rings. For the entire period of the programme of marking the A. pomarina population in Slovakia in the years 2000-2012 a total of 952 inds. were ringed, 933 of which were young birds in nest and 19 adult individuals. In the period 2009-2012 48 records were obtained from observations of 35 individuals of different age categories (31 individuals from one to 11 years old, three of unknown age and one young individual about one month after fledging the nest). The age categories of immature individuals were determined, and six were found to be one-year-old individuals (12.5%) in the second calendar year of life after their first return from wintering grounds, six were two-year-old eagles (12.5%) and five were three-year-old eagles (10.4%) which spent breeding periods in Europe at a relatively small distance from their place of hatching. Adult individuals were found to be in their current breeding grounds at distances of 8-249 km from their hatching place. In the period 2000-2012 three individuals were recorded 3× and four individuals 2×. The results confirm breeding site fidelity in adults, but also the fidelity of immature individuals to their hatching place, and the return of one-year-old individuals from their wintering grounds to the vicinity of their hatching place immediately in the first year of life (that is, in the second calendar year).

Keywords

  • colour rings
  • recovery rate
  • resighting rate
  • nest site fidelity
  • age categories
  • occurrence of immature individuals
access type Open Access

Abundance of raptors and habitat preferences of the common buzzard Buteo buteo and the common kestrel Falco tinnunculus during the non-breeding season in an agricultural landscape (Western Slovakia)

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 37 - 42

Abstract

Abstract

Habitat use and preferences by raptors were studied during three non-breeding seasons (2011-201 3) in an agricultural landscape in western Slovakia. The non-breeding season on agricultural land showed high variation and changes in the cover of habitats related to human activities. The most abundant raptor species were the common buzzard Buteo buteo (L.) (1 52 individuals) and the common kestrel Falco tinnunculus (L.) (78 individuals). The common buzzard preferred alfalfa and avoided ploughed fields. The common kestrel showed a high habitat preference for alfalfa, corn fields, stubbles and fallow. It also avoided ploughed fields and wheat.

Keywords

  • landscape
  • agricultural land
access type Open Access

Movements of a juvenile red kite Milvus milvus in the border zone of Aaustria, Slovakia and the Czech Republic

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 43 - 48

Abstract

Abstract

One juvenile female red kite was tracked during 2011-2013. The bird was tagged with a leg-mount radio transmitter in a nest in the Záhorská nížina Lowland in western Slovakia. Movements were monitored in the natal area and in the temporary settlement area (TSA). These areas were 40 km apart. The location of the TSA in the border zone ofAustria, Slovakia and the Czech Republic confirmed information about the wintering of local birds in the region. The temporary settlement area (MCP = 402.0 km2, 95% FKP = 622.8 km2, 50% FKP = 68.6 km2) was mainly situated in Austria. The natal area was significantly smaller (MCP = 34.7 km2, 95% FKP = 32.3 km2, 50% FKP = 5.0 km2). The juvenile hunted an average of 12.5 km from the communal roost place.

Keywords

  • telemetry
  • wintering
  • roost place
  • temporary settlement area
access type Open Access

Communal roosting and the seasonal dynamics of the hen harrier Circus cyaneus in the Záhorie region

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 49 - 58

Abstract

Abstract

A count of hen harriers Circus cyaneus was carried out at roost sites in south-western Slovakia from 1 992-2013. The number of sites and also the frequency of survey visits were different in different years. A total of 1 03 counts were carried out. Hen harriers were not seen roosting at the sites in 13 cases. In all, 10 localities with 14 roost sites were checked. Hen harriers roosted in sedge (5) or in ruderal associations (6) and meadows (3). A total of 634 individuals were recorded roosting. There were 483 brown birds (adult females and immature birds in the first calendar year) and 151 grey birds (males in the second calendar year and older). The average number of hen harriers at the roost sites ranged from 3 to 9 individual birds. The maximum number was at least 27 individuals (December 15, 2011 ; a minimum of 18 brown birds and 9 grey birds, Moravský Svätý Ján, Pacitov locality). The percentage of roosting males was 23.76%. The time period of roosting was also recorded. The last individuals were observed flying over the site from six minutes before sunset to 40 minutes after sunset. The average time of the last observation was approximately 1 7 minutes after sunset. The average luminosity at the last observation of an active individual bird was 28 lux. Hen harriers migrate from October to March in the study area. Occurrences in September, respectively in April and May, were very rare. Most registration and the highest number of individual birds were recorded in October, but especially in December and February.

Keywords

  • winter roost
  • crepuscular activity
access type Open Access

Diet of the ural owl (Strix uralensis) in Slovakia

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 59 - 71

Abstract

Abstract

A Central European subspecies of the Ural owl Strix uralensis macroura (Wolf, 1810) is widespread in the territory of Slovakia. The work presents unpublished data on the diet of this subspecies from several territorial units of eastern and northern Slovakia, obtained from pellets and the nest linings in boxes (1 ,564 pieces). There is less data about prey brought to young in the nest but still not yet consumed (137 pieces). Published data from analysis of the stomachs of dead and shot owls come from the first six decades of the 20th century. Together with existing published data, 2,134 pieces of the diet of S. uralensis from Slovakia are evaluated. They indicate the dominance of non-forest species Microtus arvalis and a more plentiful representation of larger species of prey: Lepus europaeus, Sciurus vulgaris and Corvus sp. In upper Orava the diet of young S. uralensis also consists of frogs Rana temporaria, moles Talpa europaea and mountain species of rodents: Microtus agrestis, M. subterraneus, Sicista betulina and Arvicola amphibius. In data from the mountains of central Slovakia the Clethrionomys glareolus has high abundance, and in eastern Slovakia the Apodemus flavicollis and A. agrarius are more represented, and in the lowlands also the Cricetus cricetus. Upon evaluation ofmaterial from the entire breeding grounds of S. uralensis it can be deduced that the basic diet consist of mammals (88.6%) from the orders Soricomorpha and Rodentia. In the countries of Central Europe the species M. arvalis, M. subterraneus, A. flavicollis and Muscardinus avellanarius are more abundantly represented, and in the Baltic states the species Sorex araneus, M. agrestis, M. oeconomus and M. rossiaemeridionalis. The species S. betulina and A. agrarius occur in the diet of S. uralensis from Central Europe up through the Far East.

Keywords

  • food ecology
  • pellets
  • prey in nests
access type Open Access

Nesting and non-nesting occurrence of the short-eared owl Asio flammeus in the Záhorie region (SW Slovakia)

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 73 - 80

Abstract

Abstract

The short-eared owl is a regular migrant and hibernant in the Záhorie region (SW Slovakia), though this species mostly escapes attention. In 1998 the species was found nesting in this region, and in 2012 individuals showing territorial behaviour were regularly observed, with high probability of nesting. Nesting habitats were localities with a high representation of meadows, corresponding to the preferred nesting sites in Slovakia. The foraging range of wintering birds was comparable with those from neighbouring regions (W Slovakia, Hungary), but with a higher number of harvest mice Micromys minutus and long-tailed field mice Apodemus sylvaticus. In both years when the nesting of birds was recorded, snowfall was significantly lower. Food sources were not monitored at these localities.

Keywords

  • snow cover
  • wintering
  • nesting
  • diet
  • Natura 2000
access type Open Access

Young of the common buzzard (Buteo buteo) reared by lesser spotted eagles (Aquila pomarina) in natural conditions in Slovakia

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 81 - 84

Abstract

Abstract

Since 2005 a breeding pair of A. pomarina has been observed near the village of Drienovec, Košice-Environs district, eastern Slovakia. Since 2009 occupied nests have been found each year with the subject pair. In the years 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2013 this pair successfully reared one young A. pomarina, but in 2012 they reared two B. buteo young during the nesting period in natural conditions and without the intervention of human beings. This is the first such documented case in the entire breeding grounds ofA. pomarina.

Keywords

  • breeding ecology
  • foster parents
  • nesting behaviour
  • unusual breeding
access type Open Access

Hunting in the dark by a peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus)

Published Online: 26 Mar 2014
Page range: 85 - 87

Abstract

Abstract

A peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) was observed preying on a mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) in Hokkaido, northern Japan, before dawn. The observation was made on 13 January 2013 about 40 minutes before sunrise, in the dark. Although there were sparse street lamps and car traffic nearby the observation point, it is not as evenly and continuously well-lit as urban areas. This suggests the potential of peregrine falcon to forage successfully in non-urban habitat under low light conditions.

Keywords

  • visual predator
  • low-light condition
  • dawn
  • nocturnal
  • non-urban habitat

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