Issues

Journal & Issues

Volume 15 (2021): Issue 1 (December 2021)

Volume 14 (2020): Issue 1 (December 2020)

Volume 13 (2019): Issue 1 (December 2019)

Volume 12 (2018): Issue 1 (December 2018)

Volume 11 (2017): Issue 1 (December 2017)

Volume 10 (2016): Issue 1 (December 2016)

Volume 9 (2015): Issue 1 (January 2015)
Special Issue Title: International Conference on the Conservation of the Lesser Spotted Eagle, Košická Belá, Slovakia, 2014

Volume 8 (2014): Issue 2014 (January 2014)
Proceedings from VII. International Conference on the Conservation of the Eastern Imperial Eagle, Bratislava, Slovakia, 2013

Volume 8 (2014): Issue 2 (December 2014)

Volume 7 (2013): Issue 2013 (January 2013)

Volume 6 (2012): Issue 2012 (January 2012)

Volume 5 (2011): Issue 2011 (January 2011)

Volume 4 (2010): Issue 2010 (January 2010)

Volume 3 (2009): Issue 2009 (January 2009)

Volume 2 (2008): Issue 2008 (January 2008)

Volume 1 (2007): Issue 2007 (January 2007)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2644-5247
First Published
09 Nov 2012
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 15 (2021): Issue 1 (December 2021)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2644-5247
First Published
09 Nov 2012
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English

Search

5 Articles
Open Access

Movements of a male greater spotted eagle (Clanga clanga) during its 2nd and 3rd calendar years

Published Online: 23 Feb 2022
Page range: 1 - 15

Abstract

Abstract

The greater spotted eagle (Clanga clanga) is poorly known compared to other European eagles. We tracked an immature greater spotted eagle during 2018–2020 within the eastern European part of the species’ distribution, west of the Ural Mountains. Because so little is published about the annual movements of this species, especially from that region, tracking data from this single individual are valuable. 95% kernel density estimator (KDE) range sizes for the two complete winters in Yemen were 4,009 km2 (2018), 1,889 km2 (2019); 95% dynamic Brownian bridge movement models (dBBMM) encompassed 1,309 km2 (2018) and 1,517 km2 (2019). It returned to the same wintering area every year. During summer 2018, it settled into a small area (95% KDE = 126 km2; 95% dBBMM = 21 km2) near Birsk, eastern European Russia; in 2019 it wandered over a huge area (95% dBBMM = 66,304 km2) of western Kazakhstan and southern Russia, south west of Yekaterinburg. Spring migration 2018 was west of the Caspian Sea; during 2019 it was east of it. Mean speed of spring migration was 160±120 km/day during 2018, and 132±109 km/day during 2019. Autumn migration passed east of the Caspian in both years, and the mean speed of migration was 62 ± 78 km/day in 2018, and 84 ± 95 km/day in 2019. During both spring and autumn migrations, the eagle made stopovers, mostly lasting 1–2 days. The eastern Alborz Mountains in northeastern Iran appeared to be an important stopover locale, where autumn stopovers lasted 19 days (2018) and 27 days (2019). These and other data suggest that most greater spotted eagles that spend summers west of about 42°E, winter in southern Europe, Asian Turkey, the Levant and Africa, and those that summer to the east of that meridian winter in southern Asia, including Arabia.

Keywords

  • satellite tracking
  • telemetry
  • migration
  • home range
  • stopovers
Open Access

Spatial and temporal changes in the diet composition of the Eurasian eagle-owl (Bubo bubo) in Slovakia comparing three historical periods

Published Online: 23 Feb 2022
Page range: 17 - 55

Abstract

Abstract

The author evaluates his own data on the food of the Eurasian eagle-owl (Bubo bubo) in Slovakia using material he collected between 1975 and 2020. A total of 105,543 food items were identified in 254 samples taken at 136 localities. Mammals had the highest representation (Mammalia, 65 species, 58.4%), and the species composition of birds was diverse (Aves, minimally 140 species, 8.5%), but the common frog (Rana temporaria, 32.0%), from the lower vertebrates, is represented more abundantly. Invertebrates (Evertebrata, 0.1%) occurred in food residues only occasionally. The bulk of the samples were collected from eagle-owl nests. The samples were divided into three time periods (A–C), which differ in the manner of human land-use management: A up to the 1950s, with a smaller area of field plots and more extensive grazing in the uplands; B from the 1950s to the 1980s, during the Socialist period, with the concentration of agricultural production in large units; C the last 30 years, 1990 to 2020, with the gradual break-up of collective land management. The first period (A) is characterised by a strong dominance of frogs, particularly the European brown frog R. temporaria (44.6%), and a large share of small mammal species of the family Muridae (genera Apodemus and Mus). During the time of Socialism (B), eagle-owls adapted to hunting larger species of mammals and birds, and the share of frogs in their food fell by half (R. temporaria, 23.3%). With the decline in livestock production after 1990 (period C), the species diversity of birds increased: aquatic species and raptors in particular are on the rise. Successive overgrowth of pastures in the submontane zone is reducing the hunting territories of eagle-owls. The dominance of the common vole (Microtus arvalis) in their diet has gradually increased from period A (26.8%) to period C (37.3%). Data from eleven areas around Slovakia are evaluated separately for the three time periods. In period A, the highest proportion of frogs was in the Liptov region (R. temporaria, 68.2%), when eagle-owls nested deeper in the mountains. The proportion of frogs decreased towards lower areas, and in the Ponitrie (Nitra river basin) it was only 10.8%. At the same time, the share of M. arvalis and larger prey increased. A similar trend of increasing shares of larger prey towards lower locations also applied during the Socialist period (B). In the last 30 years (C), frogs in the higher river basins have given way to European water voles Arvicola amphibius and M. arvalis. In association with the progressive overgrowth of pastures, forest species such as the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) and bank vole (Myodes glareolus) are increasingly prevalent, as are the white-breasted hedgehog (Erinaceus roumanicus) and various thrushes (Turdus sp.).

Keywords

  • Eurasian eagle-owl
  • diet
  • Slovakia
  • spatial and temporal changes
Open Access

Overview of raptor and owl ringing in Slovakia in 2020

Published Online: 24 Mar 2022
Page range: 57 - 74

Abstract

Abstract

In 2020, 1296 raptors and owls (23 species) were ringed in Slovakia. The most abundant was the common kestrel (719 individuals), then the western marsh harrier (126) and saker falcon (92). The proportion of nestlings among all the ringed individuals was 76.7%. In the given period, 145 recoveries of raptors and owls (15 species) were recorded in the Bird Ringing Centre database. This number included 77 recoveries of colour-marked individuals recovered in our territory. There were 43 recoveries of birds ringed in Slovakia and resighted abroad. The last 25 recoveries were of individuals ringed abroad and recovered in Slovakia. In summary, most of the recoveries (of all types) were of red-footed falcon (69 recoveries), then common kestrel (17) and eastern imperial eagle (15). Most of the recovery circumstances were ring reading (almost 76% in total), findings of bird cadavers (6%) and recaptures (5%). Electrocutions and predations by other animals (3% each) were frequent causes of their deaths.

Keywords

  • birds of prey
  • owls
  • ringing data
  • recoveries
  • Slovakia
Open Access

Corrigendum: Trend in an isolated population of the red-footed falcon (Falco vespertinus) at the edge of its breeding range (south-western Slovakia)

Published Online: 24 Mar 2022
Page range: 89 - 90

Abstract

Abstract

Table 1 in original paper (Slobodník et al. 2017, Slovak Raptor Journal 11: 83–89) was published with incorrect data. Correct version is published here.

Keywords

  • isolated population
  • trend
Open Access

Post-fledging dependence period, dispersal movements and temporary settlement areas in saker falcons (Falco cherrug)

Published Online: 24 Mar 2022
Page range: 75 - 87

Abstract

Abstract

Information on mortality rates and their causes in raptors and owls during the post-fledging dependency period (PFDP) and subsequent dispersal is essential for their more effective protection, including more efficient use of funds. Despite the importance of the above data, these data are not yet available for most birds of prey. The study aimed to provide and expand the knowledge in this field for saker falcon. We used satellite telemetry to monitor a total of six young birds since they left the nest boxes. All young birds survived the PFDP, but none survived to adulthood and died during the period of dispersal movements. The PFDP lasted 47 days (median value hereinafter), and the distance of individuals from the nest boxes during this period was 3.2 km (maximum distance 9 km). The area of the home range of the PFDP calculated by the 100% minimum convex polygon (MCP) method was 81 km2. During the period of dispersal movements, the monitored individuals set up five temporary settlement areas with an area of 422 km2 according to 100% MCP, where they stayed for 37 days. All individuals’ mean length of movement routes throughout the monitoring period was 3862 km. The main finding of the present study is the fact that none of the monitored individuals survived the dispersal period. At least half of them died due to human activity (electrocution, hunting), which is probably unbearable in the long term for wild populations of most animal species. This shows the need to start eliminating all types of artificial traps (e.g., electrocution, hunting, poisoning, etc.) without delay, thus helping to prevent the decline of populations of many species in the shorter or longer time horizon.

Keywords

  • mortality rate
  • causes of death
  • satellite tracking
  • breeding period
  • minimum convex polygon
  • home range
5 Articles
Open Access

Movements of a male greater spotted eagle (Clanga clanga) during its 2nd and 3rd calendar years

Published Online: 23 Feb 2022
Page range: 1 - 15

Abstract

Abstract

The greater spotted eagle (Clanga clanga) is poorly known compared to other European eagles. We tracked an immature greater spotted eagle during 2018–2020 within the eastern European part of the species’ distribution, west of the Ural Mountains. Because so little is published about the annual movements of this species, especially from that region, tracking data from this single individual are valuable. 95% kernel density estimator (KDE) range sizes for the two complete winters in Yemen were 4,009 km2 (2018), 1,889 km2 (2019); 95% dynamic Brownian bridge movement models (dBBMM) encompassed 1,309 km2 (2018) and 1,517 km2 (2019). It returned to the same wintering area every year. During summer 2018, it settled into a small area (95% KDE = 126 km2; 95% dBBMM = 21 km2) near Birsk, eastern European Russia; in 2019 it wandered over a huge area (95% dBBMM = 66,304 km2) of western Kazakhstan and southern Russia, south west of Yekaterinburg. Spring migration 2018 was west of the Caspian Sea; during 2019 it was east of it. Mean speed of spring migration was 160±120 km/day during 2018, and 132±109 km/day during 2019. Autumn migration passed east of the Caspian in both years, and the mean speed of migration was 62 ± 78 km/day in 2018, and 84 ± 95 km/day in 2019. During both spring and autumn migrations, the eagle made stopovers, mostly lasting 1–2 days. The eastern Alborz Mountains in northeastern Iran appeared to be an important stopover locale, where autumn stopovers lasted 19 days (2018) and 27 days (2019). These and other data suggest that most greater spotted eagles that spend summers west of about 42°E, winter in southern Europe, Asian Turkey, the Levant and Africa, and those that summer to the east of that meridian winter in southern Asia, including Arabia.

Keywords

  • satellite tracking
  • telemetry
  • migration
  • home range
  • stopovers
Open Access

Spatial and temporal changes in the diet composition of the Eurasian eagle-owl (Bubo bubo) in Slovakia comparing three historical periods

Published Online: 23 Feb 2022
Page range: 17 - 55

Abstract

Abstract

The author evaluates his own data on the food of the Eurasian eagle-owl (Bubo bubo) in Slovakia using material he collected between 1975 and 2020. A total of 105,543 food items were identified in 254 samples taken at 136 localities. Mammals had the highest representation (Mammalia, 65 species, 58.4%), and the species composition of birds was diverse (Aves, minimally 140 species, 8.5%), but the common frog (Rana temporaria, 32.0%), from the lower vertebrates, is represented more abundantly. Invertebrates (Evertebrata, 0.1%) occurred in food residues only occasionally. The bulk of the samples were collected from eagle-owl nests. The samples were divided into three time periods (A–C), which differ in the manner of human land-use management: A up to the 1950s, with a smaller area of field plots and more extensive grazing in the uplands; B from the 1950s to the 1980s, during the Socialist period, with the concentration of agricultural production in large units; C the last 30 years, 1990 to 2020, with the gradual break-up of collective land management. The first period (A) is characterised by a strong dominance of frogs, particularly the European brown frog R. temporaria (44.6%), and a large share of small mammal species of the family Muridae (genera Apodemus and Mus). During the time of Socialism (B), eagle-owls adapted to hunting larger species of mammals and birds, and the share of frogs in their food fell by half (R. temporaria, 23.3%). With the decline in livestock production after 1990 (period C), the species diversity of birds increased: aquatic species and raptors in particular are on the rise. Successive overgrowth of pastures in the submontane zone is reducing the hunting territories of eagle-owls. The dominance of the common vole (Microtus arvalis) in their diet has gradually increased from period A (26.8%) to period C (37.3%). Data from eleven areas around Slovakia are evaluated separately for the three time periods. In period A, the highest proportion of frogs was in the Liptov region (R. temporaria, 68.2%), when eagle-owls nested deeper in the mountains. The proportion of frogs decreased towards lower areas, and in the Ponitrie (Nitra river basin) it was only 10.8%. At the same time, the share of M. arvalis and larger prey increased. A similar trend of increasing shares of larger prey towards lower locations also applied during the Socialist period (B). In the last 30 years (C), frogs in the higher river basins have given way to European water voles Arvicola amphibius and M. arvalis. In association with the progressive overgrowth of pastures, forest species such as the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) and bank vole (Myodes glareolus) are increasingly prevalent, as are the white-breasted hedgehog (Erinaceus roumanicus) and various thrushes (Turdus sp.).

Keywords

  • Eurasian eagle-owl
  • diet
  • Slovakia
  • spatial and temporal changes
Open Access

Overview of raptor and owl ringing in Slovakia in 2020

Published Online: 24 Mar 2022
Page range: 57 - 74

Abstract

Abstract

In 2020, 1296 raptors and owls (23 species) were ringed in Slovakia. The most abundant was the common kestrel (719 individuals), then the western marsh harrier (126) and saker falcon (92). The proportion of nestlings among all the ringed individuals was 76.7%. In the given period, 145 recoveries of raptors and owls (15 species) were recorded in the Bird Ringing Centre database. This number included 77 recoveries of colour-marked individuals recovered in our territory. There were 43 recoveries of birds ringed in Slovakia and resighted abroad. The last 25 recoveries were of individuals ringed abroad and recovered in Slovakia. In summary, most of the recoveries (of all types) were of red-footed falcon (69 recoveries), then common kestrel (17) and eastern imperial eagle (15). Most of the recovery circumstances were ring reading (almost 76% in total), findings of bird cadavers (6%) and recaptures (5%). Electrocutions and predations by other animals (3% each) were frequent causes of their deaths.

Keywords

  • birds of prey
  • owls
  • ringing data
  • recoveries
  • Slovakia
Open Access

Corrigendum: Trend in an isolated population of the red-footed falcon (Falco vespertinus) at the edge of its breeding range (south-western Slovakia)

Published Online: 24 Mar 2022
Page range: 89 - 90

Abstract

Abstract

Table 1 in original paper (Slobodník et al. 2017, Slovak Raptor Journal 11: 83–89) was published with incorrect data. Correct version is published here.

Keywords

  • isolated population
  • trend
Open Access

Post-fledging dependence period, dispersal movements and temporary settlement areas in saker falcons (Falco cherrug)

Published Online: 24 Mar 2022
Page range: 75 - 87

Abstract

Abstract

Information on mortality rates and their causes in raptors and owls during the post-fledging dependency period (PFDP) and subsequent dispersal is essential for their more effective protection, including more efficient use of funds. Despite the importance of the above data, these data are not yet available for most birds of prey. The study aimed to provide and expand the knowledge in this field for saker falcon. We used satellite telemetry to monitor a total of six young birds since they left the nest boxes. All young birds survived the PFDP, but none survived to adulthood and died during the period of dispersal movements. The PFDP lasted 47 days (median value hereinafter), and the distance of individuals from the nest boxes during this period was 3.2 km (maximum distance 9 km). The area of the home range of the PFDP calculated by the 100% minimum convex polygon (MCP) method was 81 km2. During the period of dispersal movements, the monitored individuals set up five temporary settlement areas with an area of 422 km2 according to 100% MCP, where they stayed for 37 days. All individuals’ mean length of movement routes throughout the monitoring period was 3862 km. The main finding of the present study is the fact that none of the monitored individuals survived the dispersal period. At least half of them died due to human activity (electrocution, hunting), which is probably unbearable in the long term for wild populations of most animal species. This shows the need to start eliminating all types of artificial traps (e.g., electrocution, hunting, poisoning, etc.) without delay, thus helping to prevent the decline of populations of many species in the shorter or longer time horizon.

Keywords

  • mortality rate
  • causes of death
  • satellite tracking
  • breeding period
  • minimum convex polygon
  • home range

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo