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Volume 21 (2021): Issue 1 (June 2021)

Volume 20 (2020): Issue 2 (December 2020)

Volume 20 (2020): Issue 1 (June 2020)

Volume 19 (2019): Issue 2 (December 2019)

Volume 19 (2019): Issue 1 (June 2019)

Volume 18 (2018): Issue 2 (December 2018)

Volume 18 (2018): Issue 1 (June 2018)

Volume 17 (2017): Issue 2 (December 2017)

Volume 17 (2017): Issue 1 (December 2017)

Volume 16 (2016): Issue 2 (December 2016)

Volume 16 (2016): Issue 1 (June 2016)

Volume 15 (2015): Issue 2 (December 2015)

Volume 15 (2015): Issue 1 (June 2015)

Volume 14 (2014): Issue 2 (December 2014)

Volume 14 (2014): Issue 1 (June 2014)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1339-7877
First Published
15 Jun 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 18 (2018): Issue 2 (December 2018)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1339-7877
First Published
15 Jun 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

6 Articles
Open Access

Ukrainians in Slovakia: Outlining the Reflection on Ethnic Identity and Autostereotypisation of the Ukrainian Minority

Published Online: 06 Apr 2019
Page range: 8 - 36

Abstract

Abstract

The paper is based on the conclusions of ethnological research of Ukrainian minority carried out by the author on the territory of Slovakia between 2014 and 2016. Its main objective was the reflection of ethnic stereotypes of the Ukrainian minority towards the Slovak majority. An unavoidable element in research on stereotyping and reflection of “national character” was also an analysis of ethnic identity of the members of the minority group. How do they perceive themselves, what does it personally mean to them to be a Ukrainian and what practically fulfills an abstract category of “being Ukrainian”. The author briefly summarizes key theoretical objectives of the concept of ethnic identity and then analyses its reflection within the Ukrainians in Slovakia with regard to its main characteristics. Ukrainian autostereotypisation in the broader context of Ukrainian-Russian relatioship is also examined.

Keywords

  • Ukrainian minority
  • Slovakia
  • ethnic identity
  • autosterotypes
  • symbolic ethnicity
Open Access

Once We Were Shepherds: Górale Ethnic Identity in Celebrations Revived and Reinterpreted

Published Online: 06 Apr 2019
Page range: 37 - 53

Abstract

Abstract

The Górale of the Polish highlands are seen as a people apart from the rest of Poles. They are afforded this special status through the romanticisation as Poland’s very own “noble savages” by the writers and travellers of the 19th century. This was the time of Poland’s search for nationhood (when its territory was occupied by Russia, Prussia and Austria). The Górale have always been described, even in those early accounts, as pastoralists.

During the season, when the sheep went up to the alpine pastures, the villages were almost deserted. In the 20th century the pastoral system dissolution took place starting with the establishment of national parks after the Second World War. Further unfavourable developments decimated what was left of it since the late 1980s. As a result of the dissolution of the pastoral system the Górale chose to amplify their internal unity by strengthening the ethnic identity. The revival of pastoralism as it currently presents itself today, may be seen as yet another rallying call around Górale identity. It is a come back to the pastoralist “core” of the highland culture, while changing and re-inventing the tradition to suit new economic, social and political circumstances.

In the Polish pastoralist tradition there have always been two seminal community events which bracketed the winter season. There was the autumn event of “Redyk Jesienny” when the sheep brought back from the summer alpine pastures were given back to their owners and there was also a spring event of “Mieszanie Owiec” which literally means the Mixing of Sheep. Historically, they were very important events of the pastoral calendar, while the pastoral system itself has been crucial fixture and backbone of the social system of the Górale people. The paper examines how these traditions changed from old ethnographic descriptions and how they are being re-invented in the context of reaffirming the Górale identity today.

Keywords

  • Górale
  • pastoral cuture
  • ethnic identity
  • re-inventing tradition
  • celebrations
Open Access

’Jakeš’s Children’. Media Portrayal of Namibian Child Refugees in Slovakia

Published Online: 06 Apr 2019
Page range: 54 - 77

Abstract

Abstract

The paper provides an insight into ‘Slovak group’ of Namibian children taken to Czechoslovakia. As a form of a communist solidarity help to the country fighting for its freedom, the children were raised and educated in newly established boarding school in Považská Bystrica from September 1989. Their stay, and particularly their sudden unexpected repatriation in 1991, raised questions not only among general public, but also in print media of those days. The article therefore discusses the media portrayal of the Slovak group of Namibian children with a special accent on the shifts in media interpretations in time. The overall research combines a biographical and historical design with the use of the qualitative analysis of print media outputs.

Keywords

  • qualitative content analysis
  • exiled children
  • Namibia
  • media analysis
  • post-socialist media
Open Access

Gurraacha: An Indigenous Inter-Ethnic Peace Building and Conflict Resolution Institution among the People of South Central Ethiopia

Published Online: 06 Apr 2019
Page range: 78 - 99

Abstract

Abstract

This article deals with Gurraacha institution, which is very important in inter-ethnic peace building and resolving conflict among people of south-central Ethiopia. This institution was named after the Oromo term ‘Gurraacha’ (literally meaning black) to indicate its power in inter-ethnic peace building and conflict resolution. It is one element of Oromo Gadaa system which was established time immemorial to sustain peace between Oromo and non-Oromo neighboring ethnic groups. The data for this study was collected through interview, observation and focus group discussions in 2014 and 2015. As revealed by this study, Gurraacha institution is a guarantee for sustaining peace among people of south-central Ethiopia by managing conflict over boundary, grazing land, looting of cattle and water points. Overall, the study concluded that Gurraacha institution has real significance in inter-ethnic peace-building, sustaining social harmony and inter-ethnic conflict resolution. In Gurraacha institution, people rebuild lost peace and order of Waaqa (God) by performing purification rituals. There is no corruption in Gurraacha institution since all activities are undertaken according to Waaqa’s law and order. There is no false oath in this institution because such act is believed to have negative consequences. The oath of Gurraacha institution which are made during reconciliation process transcend generations. This institution is the model of conflict transformation which is hardly found in today’s world. Therefore, using this indigenous institution for future policy formulation in the country as inter-ethnic peace building and conflict resolution model is important for the realization of sustainable peace and development.

Keywords

  • institution
  • peace building
  • system
  • inter-ethnic
  • conflict transformation
  • Oromo
Open Access

Skin Bleaching Narratives Responses from Women Bleaches and Stakeholders in Ghana (1950s – 2015)

Published Online: 06 Apr 2019
Page range: 100 - 117

Abstract

Abstract

Based on a qualitative design and a qualitative analysis of responses from primary informants and secondary sources we present a narrative on the attitudes and perception of the Ghanaian on skin bleaching. Based on retrospective and thematic analyses the authors conclude that there is the need for education and enforcement of laws that protect the consumer from patronizing cosmetics that bleach the skin. The study further highlights the role of institutions that are responsible for legislating, regulating, preventing and educating the general public. It is envisaged that this article shall reinvigorate the need for further research and discourses on skin bleaching in Africa and Ghana in particular. Policy makers and policy implementers should be spurred on to make a difference.

Keywords

  • skin bleaching
  • women bleachers
  • stakeholders
  • Ghana
Open Access

Food Festivals and Expectations of Local Development in Northern Italy

Published Online: 06 Apr 2019
Page range: 118 - 134

Abstract

Abstract

This essay offers an ethnographic analysis of the role of food in modern Italian food festivals. Starting from the ethnographic case of Borgonovo, a rural town in Southern Piedmont, and its festival, it highlights the nonlinear role played by food in the festivals and points out gastronomic festivals should be read as a local response of rural, and marginal communities to the phenomenon of their social marginalization.

Keywords

  • Italy
  • food
  • local development
  • tourism
  • ethnography
6 Articles
Open Access

Ukrainians in Slovakia: Outlining the Reflection on Ethnic Identity and Autostereotypisation of the Ukrainian Minority

Published Online: 06 Apr 2019
Page range: 8 - 36

Abstract

Abstract

The paper is based on the conclusions of ethnological research of Ukrainian minority carried out by the author on the territory of Slovakia between 2014 and 2016. Its main objective was the reflection of ethnic stereotypes of the Ukrainian minority towards the Slovak majority. An unavoidable element in research on stereotyping and reflection of “national character” was also an analysis of ethnic identity of the members of the minority group. How do they perceive themselves, what does it personally mean to them to be a Ukrainian and what practically fulfills an abstract category of “being Ukrainian”. The author briefly summarizes key theoretical objectives of the concept of ethnic identity and then analyses its reflection within the Ukrainians in Slovakia with regard to its main characteristics. Ukrainian autostereotypisation in the broader context of Ukrainian-Russian relatioship is also examined.

Keywords

  • Ukrainian minority
  • Slovakia
  • ethnic identity
  • autosterotypes
  • symbolic ethnicity
Open Access

Once We Were Shepherds: Górale Ethnic Identity in Celebrations Revived and Reinterpreted

Published Online: 06 Apr 2019
Page range: 37 - 53

Abstract

Abstract

The Górale of the Polish highlands are seen as a people apart from the rest of Poles. They are afforded this special status through the romanticisation as Poland’s very own “noble savages” by the writers and travellers of the 19th century. This was the time of Poland’s search for nationhood (when its territory was occupied by Russia, Prussia and Austria). The Górale have always been described, even in those early accounts, as pastoralists.

During the season, when the sheep went up to the alpine pastures, the villages were almost deserted. In the 20th century the pastoral system dissolution took place starting with the establishment of national parks after the Second World War. Further unfavourable developments decimated what was left of it since the late 1980s. As a result of the dissolution of the pastoral system the Górale chose to amplify their internal unity by strengthening the ethnic identity. The revival of pastoralism as it currently presents itself today, may be seen as yet another rallying call around Górale identity. It is a come back to the pastoralist “core” of the highland culture, while changing and re-inventing the tradition to suit new economic, social and political circumstances.

In the Polish pastoralist tradition there have always been two seminal community events which bracketed the winter season. There was the autumn event of “Redyk Jesienny” when the sheep brought back from the summer alpine pastures were given back to their owners and there was also a spring event of “Mieszanie Owiec” which literally means the Mixing of Sheep. Historically, they were very important events of the pastoral calendar, while the pastoral system itself has been crucial fixture and backbone of the social system of the Górale people. The paper examines how these traditions changed from old ethnographic descriptions and how they are being re-invented in the context of reaffirming the Górale identity today.

Keywords

  • Górale
  • pastoral cuture
  • ethnic identity
  • re-inventing tradition
  • celebrations
Open Access

’Jakeš’s Children’. Media Portrayal of Namibian Child Refugees in Slovakia

Published Online: 06 Apr 2019
Page range: 54 - 77

Abstract

Abstract

The paper provides an insight into ‘Slovak group’ of Namibian children taken to Czechoslovakia. As a form of a communist solidarity help to the country fighting for its freedom, the children were raised and educated in newly established boarding school in Považská Bystrica from September 1989. Their stay, and particularly their sudden unexpected repatriation in 1991, raised questions not only among general public, but also in print media of those days. The article therefore discusses the media portrayal of the Slovak group of Namibian children with a special accent on the shifts in media interpretations in time. The overall research combines a biographical and historical design with the use of the qualitative analysis of print media outputs.

Keywords

  • qualitative content analysis
  • exiled children
  • Namibia
  • media analysis
  • post-socialist media
Open Access

Gurraacha: An Indigenous Inter-Ethnic Peace Building and Conflict Resolution Institution among the People of South Central Ethiopia

Published Online: 06 Apr 2019
Page range: 78 - 99

Abstract

Abstract

This article deals with Gurraacha institution, which is very important in inter-ethnic peace building and resolving conflict among people of south-central Ethiopia. This institution was named after the Oromo term ‘Gurraacha’ (literally meaning black) to indicate its power in inter-ethnic peace building and conflict resolution. It is one element of Oromo Gadaa system which was established time immemorial to sustain peace between Oromo and non-Oromo neighboring ethnic groups. The data for this study was collected through interview, observation and focus group discussions in 2014 and 2015. As revealed by this study, Gurraacha institution is a guarantee for sustaining peace among people of south-central Ethiopia by managing conflict over boundary, grazing land, looting of cattle and water points. Overall, the study concluded that Gurraacha institution has real significance in inter-ethnic peace-building, sustaining social harmony and inter-ethnic conflict resolution. In Gurraacha institution, people rebuild lost peace and order of Waaqa (God) by performing purification rituals. There is no corruption in Gurraacha institution since all activities are undertaken according to Waaqa’s law and order. There is no false oath in this institution because such act is believed to have negative consequences. The oath of Gurraacha institution which are made during reconciliation process transcend generations. This institution is the model of conflict transformation which is hardly found in today’s world. Therefore, using this indigenous institution for future policy formulation in the country as inter-ethnic peace building and conflict resolution model is important for the realization of sustainable peace and development.

Keywords

  • institution
  • peace building
  • system
  • inter-ethnic
  • conflict transformation
  • Oromo
Open Access

Skin Bleaching Narratives Responses from Women Bleaches and Stakeholders in Ghana (1950s – 2015)

Published Online: 06 Apr 2019
Page range: 100 - 117

Abstract

Abstract

Based on a qualitative design and a qualitative analysis of responses from primary informants and secondary sources we present a narrative on the attitudes and perception of the Ghanaian on skin bleaching. Based on retrospective and thematic analyses the authors conclude that there is the need for education and enforcement of laws that protect the consumer from patronizing cosmetics that bleach the skin. The study further highlights the role of institutions that are responsible for legislating, regulating, preventing and educating the general public. It is envisaged that this article shall reinvigorate the need for further research and discourses on skin bleaching in Africa and Ghana in particular. Policy makers and policy implementers should be spurred on to make a difference.

Keywords

  • skin bleaching
  • women bleachers
  • stakeholders
  • Ghana
Open Access

Food Festivals and Expectations of Local Development in Northern Italy

Published Online: 06 Apr 2019
Page range: 118 - 134

Abstract

Abstract

This essay offers an ethnographic analysis of the role of food in modern Italian food festivals. Starting from the ethnographic case of Borgonovo, a rural town in Southern Piedmont, and its festival, it highlights the nonlinear role played by food in the festivals and points out gastronomic festivals should be read as a local response of rural, and marginal communities to the phenomenon of their social marginalization.

Keywords

  • Italy
  • food
  • local development
  • tourism
  • ethnography

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