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Volume 21 (2021): Issue 1 (June 2021)

Volume 20 (2020): Issue 2 (December 2020)

Volume 20 (2020): Issue 1 (June 2020)

Volume 19 (2019): Issue 2 (December 2019)

Volume 19 (2019): Issue 1 (June 2019)

Volume 18 (2018): Issue 2 (December 2018)

Volume 18 (2018): Issue 1 (June 2018)

Volume 17 (2017): Issue 2 (December 2017)

Volume 17 (2017): Issue 1 (December 2017)

Volume 16 (2016): Issue 2 (December 2016)

Volume 16 (2016): Issue 1 (June 2016)

Volume 15 (2015): Issue 2 (December 2015)

Volume 15 (2015): Issue 1 (June 2015)

Volume 14 (2014): Issue 2 (December 2014)

Volume 14 (2014): Issue 1 (June 2014)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1339-7877
First Published
15 Jun 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 18 (2018): Issue 1 (June 2018)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1339-7877
First Published
15 Jun 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

6 Articles
Open Access

Gender in Fulani Proverbs

Published Online: 25 Jan 2019
Page range: 8 - 16

Abstract

Abstract

Presented paper deals with Fulani people of West Africa and with the influence of their way of life on their language. One part of the Fulani people lives nomadic pastoral live, meanwhile another part is sedentary, living in the towns. The authors of the paper pay their attention to the the gender of Fulani proverbs which reflects the way of life of Fulani people.

Keywords

  • Fulani
  • proverbs
  • linguistics
  • pastoralism
  • sedentarism
  • West Africa
Open Access

Intractable Pernicious Practices in West Africa

Published Online: 25 Jan 2019
Page range: 17 - 41

Abstract

Abstract

Spiteful practices such as human sacrifice and cannibalism have endured the abhorrence of various peoples of the world. However, European powers magnified the proportion of these activities in other parts of the world to justify their colonial agenda of subjugation and exploitation, while they equally partook of it in various shades at different times in their history. This paper, focused on West Africa, explains both the motives fuelling the intractable problems and the obstacles encysting their elimination. Although some solutions were proffered, the ingrained problem will continue to resist change.

Keywords

  • athropophagy
  • cannibalism
  • ritual murder
  • human sacrifice
  • West Africa
Open Access

”The History of Human Stupidity”: Vojtěch Frič and his Program of a Comparative Study of Religions

Published Online: 25 Jan 2019
Page range: 42 - 67

Abstract

Abstract

The present article represents a partial outcome of a larger project that focuses on the history of the beginnings of anthropology as an organized science at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries, in the broader socio-political context of Central Europe. Attention is focused especially on the nationalist and social competitions that had an important impact upon intellectual developments, but in turn were influenced by the activities of scholars and their public activities. The case study of Vojtěch (Alberto) Frič, traveler and amateur anthropologist, who in the first two decades of the twentieth century presented to European scientific circles and the general public in the Czech Lands his magnanimous vision of the comparative study of religions, serves as a starting point for considerations concerning the general debates on the purpose, methods, and ethical dimensions of ethnology as these were resonating in Central European academia of the period under study.

Keywords

  • Vojtěch (Alberto) Frič
  • Náprstek Museum
  • anthropology
  • comparative religious studies
  • history of anthropology
Open Access

Aspects Determining the Auto-identification of Native Communities in Contemporary Peru

Published Online: 25 Jan 2019
Page range: 68 - 92

Abstract

Abstract

The case of Peru evinces quite specific aspects missing in other states with numerous indigenous minorities. During the second half of the 20th century, indigenous communities in local sierra were officially renamed as agrarian communities (comunidades campesinas), which resulted in wiping their identity away in exchange for land reform and incorporation to state structures. The status of native people has slightly improved since the introduction of a new constitution in 1993 and the implementation of responsive laws later. However, up to the present the self-identification with the terms Quechua, Aymara, indigenous, native, mestizo or campesino often results in extensive consequences stemming from the persisting racism and hierarchic society. This article deals with the impacts related to ethnicity and auto-identification in contemporary Peru, focusing on variables determining the status of indigenous people within the 25 Peruvian regions. The national census held in autumn 2017 incorporated for the first time in history the possibility of ethnic auto-identification. The anticipated results might outline a new direction in terms of social status and identification within the native communities.

Keywords

  • Peru
  • Quechua
  • native communities
  • self-identification
  • racism
  • census 2017
Open Access

Sixteenth-century Mexican Monasteries and Art. An Anthropological Perspective

Published Online: 25 Jan 2019
Page range: 93 - 124

Abstract

Abstract

This paper deals with sixteenth-century Mexican monastic architecture and art. Mexican monasteries were constructed all over the territory of New Spain (1635-1821) in relation to the need to evangelize the native American populations. The article discusses the place of this architecture and art in the historiography of the history of art taking into consideration the changes of paradigms and putting particular emphasis on anthropology and its approaches. In terms of method, it is interdisciplinary and combines synchronic and diachronic perspectives.

Keywords

  • Mexico
  • New Spain
  • sixteenth century
  • evangelization
  • native American populations
  • monasteries
  • art
  • interdisciplinarity
  • history
  • anthropology
  • synchrony and diachrony
Open Access

The Laws of Motecuhzoma Ilhuicamina

Published Online: 25 Jan 2019
Page range: 125 - 169

Abstract

Abstract

The article deals with contents, as well as social contexts and functions of sixteen laws enacted by Motecuhzoma Ilhuicamina or Motecuhzoma I, the fifth ruler (ruled ca. 1440-1460 AD) of a pre-Hispanic city-state Tenochtitlan, the principal capital of the Aztec Empire. The author also focuses on the problem of Motecuhzoma I´s laws´ factual enforcement and discusses its possible limits.

The enactment of Motecuhzoma I´s laws was an important part of state formation process in Tenochtitlan. These laws reinforced the internal hierarchy of Tenochtitlan society and the privileged social position of a tiny ruling class (ruler, nobles by birth, merited non-noble warriors and their quasi-noble descendants), particularly by excluding masses of ordinary people from the exercise of political power, as well as the acquisition, ownership and public display of the so-called “prestige objects”, which were markers of a higher social status (i.e. belonging to the ruling class). Further they established a complex state apparatus of Tenochtitlan (a system of both central and local city-state administration and judiciary), which was headed by a ruler (tlatoani). The laws also helped spread Tenochtitlan official ideology of a religious nature among the population, as they created a mechanism to introduce virtually all nobles and commoners (of both sexes) to the ideology (public schools compulsory attended by all later pubertal and adolescent youth of Tenochtitlan), as well as an organization of priests who dramatized the ideological doctrines by their (mostly public) ritual performancies. Finally, there were also laws concerning the punishment of adulterers and thieves. The factual enforcement of Motecuhzoma I´s laws by Tenochtitlan ruler/state apparatus was limited due to several reasons, e.g. the rise of local autonomous and autarchic socioeconomic units resisting to some degree the power of state and the law enacted by the state.

Keywords

  • pre-Hispanic period
  • Tenochtitlan
  • Motecuhzoma Ilhuicamina
  • Motecuhzoma´s laws
  • Motecuhzoma´s laws´contents
  • Motecuhzoma´s laws´social contexts and functions
6 Articles
Open Access

Gender in Fulani Proverbs

Published Online: 25 Jan 2019
Page range: 8 - 16

Abstract

Abstract

Presented paper deals with Fulani people of West Africa and with the influence of their way of life on their language. One part of the Fulani people lives nomadic pastoral live, meanwhile another part is sedentary, living in the towns. The authors of the paper pay their attention to the the gender of Fulani proverbs which reflects the way of life of Fulani people.

Keywords

  • Fulani
  • proverbs
  • linguistics
  • pastoralism
  • sedentarism
  • West Africa
Open Access

Intractable Pernicious Practices in West Africa

Published Online: 25 Jan 2019
Page range: 17 - 41

Abstract

Abstract

Spiteful practices such as human sacrifice and cannibalism have endured the abhorrence of various peoples of the world. However, European powers magnified the proportion of these activities in other parts of the world to justify their colonial agenda of subjugation and exploitation, while they equally partook of it in various shades at different times in their history. This paper, focused on West Africa, explains both the motives fuelling the intractable problems and the obstacles encysting their elimination. Although some solutions were proffered, the ingrained problem will continue to resist change.

Keywords

  • athropophagy
  • cannibalism
  • ritual murder
  • human sacrifice
  • West Africa
Open Access

”The History of Human Stupidity”: Vojtěch Frič and his Program of a Comparative Study of Religions

Published Online: 25 Jan 2019
Page range: 42 - 67

Abstract

Abstract

The present article represents a partial outcome of a larger project that focuses on the history of the beginnings of anthropology as an organized science at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries, in the broader socio-political context of Central Europe. Attention is focused especially on the nationalist and social competitions that had an important impact upon intellectual developments, but in turn were influenced by the activities of scholars and their public activities. The case study of Vojtěch (Alberto) Frič, traveler and amateur anthropologist, who in the first two decades of the twentieth century presented to European scientific circles and the general public in the Czech Lands his magnanimous vision of the comparative study of religions, serves as a starting point for considerations concerning the general debates on the purpose, methods, and ethical dimensions of ethnology as these were resonating in Central European academia of the period under study.

Keywords

  • Vojtěch (Alberto) Frič
  • Náprstek Museum
  • anthropology
  • comparative religious studies
  • history of anthropology
Open Access

Aspects Determining the Auto-identification of Native Communities in Contemporary Peru

Published Online: 25 Jan 2019
Page range: 68 - 92

Abstract

Abstract

The case of Peru evinces quite specific aspects missing in other states with numerous indigenous minorities. During the second half of the 20th century, indigenous communities in local sierra were officially renamed as agrarian communities (comunidades campesinas), which resulted in wiping their identity away in exchange for land reform and incorporation to state structures. The status of native people has slightly improved since the introduction of a new constitution in 1993 and the implementation of responsive laws later. However, up to the present the self-identification with the terms Quechua, Aymara, indigenous, native, mestizo or campesino often results in extensive consequences stemming from the persisting racism and hierarchic society. This article deals with the impacts related to ethnicity and auto-identification in contemporary Peru, focusing on variables determining the status of indigenous people within the 25 Peruvian regions. The national census held in autumn 2017 incorporated for the first time in history the possibility of ethnic auto-identification. The anticipated results might outline a new direction in terms of social status and identification within the native communities.

Keywords

  • Peru
  • Quechua
  • native communities
  • self-identification
  • racism
  • census 2017
Open Access

Sixteenth-century Mexican Monasteries and Art. An Anthropological Perspective

Published Online: 25 Jan 2019
Page range: 93 - 124

Abstract

Abstract

This paper deals with sixteenth-century Mexican monastic architecture and art. Mexican monasteries were constructed all over the territory of New Spain (1635-1821) in relation to the need to evangelize the native American populations. The article discusses the place of this architecture and art in the historiography of the history of art taking into consideration the changes of paradigms and putting particular emphasis on anthropology and its approaches. In terms of method, it is interdisciplinary and combines synchronic and diachronic perspectives.

Keywords

  • Mexico
  • New Spain
  • sixteenth century
  • evangelization
  • native American populations
  • monasteries
  • art
  • interdisciplinarity
  • history
  • anthropology
  • synchrony and diachrony
Open Access

The Laws of Motecuhzoma Ilhuicamina

Published Online: 25 Jan 2019
Page range: 125 - 169

Abstract

Abstract

The article deals with contents, as well as social contexts and functions of sixteen laws enacted by Motecuhzoma Ilhuicamina or Motecuhzoma I, the fifth ruler (ruled ca. 1440-1460 AD) of a pre-Hispanic city-state Tenochtitlan, the principal capital of the Aztec Empire. The author also focuses on the problem of Motecuhzoma I´s laws´ factual enforcement and discusses its possible limits.

The enactment of Motecuhzoma I´s laws was an important part of state formation process in Tenochtitlan. These laws reinforced the internal hierarchy of Tenochtitlan society and the privileged social position of a tiny ruling class (ruler, nobles by birth, merited non-noble warriors and their quasi-noble descendants), particularly by excluding masses of ordinary people from the exercise of political power, as well as the acquisition, ownership and public display of the so-called “prestige objects”, which were markers of a higher social status (i.e. belonging to the ruling class). Further they established a complex state apparatus of Tenochtitlan (a system of both central and local city-state administration and judiciary), which was headed by a ruler (tlatoani). The laws also helped spread Tenochtitlan official ideology of a religious nature among the population, as they created a mechanism to introduce virtually all nobles and commoners (of both sexes) to the ideology (public schools compulsory attended by all later pubertal and adolescent youth of Tenochtitlan), as well as an organization of priests who dramatized the ideological doctrines by their (mostly public) ritual performancies. Finally, there were also laws concerning the punishment of adulterers and thieves. The factual enforcement of Motecuhzoma I´s laws by Tenochtitlan ruler/state apparatus was limited due to several reasons, e.g. the rise of local autonomous and autarchic socioeconomic units resisting to some degree the power of state and the law enacted by the state.

Keywords

  • pre-Hispanic period
  • Tenochtitlan
  • Motecuhzoma Ilhuicamina
  • Motecuhzoma´s laws
  • Motecuhzoma´s laws´contents
  • Motecuhzoma´s laws´social contexts and functions

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