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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2083-4799
ISSN
1730-2439
First Published
23 Sep 2008
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 12 (2012): Issue 3 (October 2012)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2083-4799
ISSN
1730-2439
First Published
23 Sep 2008
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

3 Articles
Open Access

Environmental degradation of titanium alloy in artificial saliva

Published Online: 23 Oct 2012
Page range: 5 - 15

Abstract

Environmental degradation of titanium alloy in artificial saliva

The titanium and its alloys are potentially prone to hydrogen embrittlement, including those proposed for dental implants. The research has been aimed to assess a susceptibility to environment-enhanced degradation of the Ti-13Zr-13Nb alloy in artificial saliva with or without hydrofluoric acid, subject or not to cathodic polarisation. The results have shown that even if artificial saliva is safe environment, both cathodic polarization and cathodic current result in brittle cracking. Either hydride-related embrittlement or fluoride-related stress corrosion cracking are considered as potential sources.

Keywords

  • titanium alloys
  • implants
  • hydrogen degradation
  • stress corrosion cracking
Open Access

Experimental investigation on effective detection of delamination in gfrp composites using taguchi method

Published Online: 23 Oct 2012
Page range: 16 - 24

Abstract

Experimental investigation on effective detection of delamination in gfrp composites using taguchi method

Detection of delamination defect in glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) by using ultrasonic testing has been a challenging task in industry. The properties of the constituent materials, fiber orientation and the stacking sequence of laminated composite materials could cause high attenuation of ultrasound signals. Ultrasonic testing is based on the interpretation of the reflected ultrasound signals when a transducer imposes ultrasound waves (pulse) to a material. It is difficult to differentiate if the reflected signal is induced from the defects, fiber content or the intermediate layers of GFRP composites. Most of the time, the drastic attenuation of signals could enshroud the modest changes in the reflected signals from defects. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of fiber orientation, thickness and delamination of GFRP composites on the rise time, pulse duration and attenuation ratio of the reflected ultrasound signal. The rise time, pulse duration and attenuation ratio of A-scan data was observed with respect to different positions of damage (delamination), thickness and stacking sequence of the lamina. It is essential to identify the significant factors that contribute to the abnormal characteristics of the reflected signals in which the defect is identified. Moreover, this paper presents the application of Taguchi method for maximizing the detection of defect in GFRP composites influenced by delamination. The optimum combination of the significant contributing factor for the signal’s abnormal characteristics and its effect on damage detection was obtained by using the analysis of signal-to-noise ratio. The finding of this study revealed that delamination is the most influential factor on the attenuation ratio.

Keywords

  • glass fiber reinforced plastics
  • ultrasonic testing
  • attenuation
  • delamination
Open Access

Bioactive core material for porous load-bearing implants

Published Online: 23 Oct 2012
Page range: 25 - 36

Abstract

Bioactive core material for porous load-bearing implants

So far state of knowledge on biodegradable materials is reviewed. Among a variety of investigated materials, those composed of polymers and ceramics may be considered as only candidates for a core material in porous titanium alloy. The collagen and chitosan among natural polymers, polyhydroxy acids among synthetic polymers, and hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate among ceramics are proposed for further research. Three essential conditions for a core material are defined as: biodegradation rate “in vitro” and “in vivo” close to bone tissue in-growth rate, high compression strength and ability to form nanoporous open structure inside the material for vascularisation. Possible deposition techniques of a core material within the macropores of metallic scaffold include infiltration of titanium porous structure with polymer scaffold followed by precipitation of phosphate nanoparticles, and mixing of phosphate and polymers before deposition followed by controlled precipitation inside the pores.

Keywords

  • biodegradation
  • polymers
  • ceramics
3 Articles
Open Access

Environmental degradation of titanium alloy in artificial saliva

Published Online: 23 Oct 2012
Page range: 5 - 15

Abstract

Environmental degradation of titanium alloy in artificial saliva

The titanium and its alloys are potentially prone to hydrogen embrittlement, including those proposed for dental implants. The research has been aimed to assess a susceptibility to environment-enhanced degradation of the Ti-13Zr-13Nb alloy in artificial saliva with or without hydrofluoric acid, subject or not to cathodic polarisation. The results have shown that even if artificial saliva is safe environment, both cathodic polarization and cathodic current result in brittle cracking. Either hydride-related embrittlement or fluoride-related stress corrosion cracking are considered as potential sources.

Keywords

  • titanium alloys
  • implants
  • hydrogen degradation
  • stress corrosion cracking
Open Access

Experimental investigation on effective detection of delamination in gfrp composites using taguchi method

Published Online: 23 Oct 2012
Page range: 16 - 24

Abstract

Experimental investigation on effective detection of delamination in gfrp composites using taguchi method

Detection of delamination defect in glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) by using ultrasonic testing has been a challenging task in industry. The properties of the constituent materials, fiber orientation and the stacking sequence of laminated composite materials could cause high attenuation of ultrasound signals. Ultrasonic testing is based on the interpretation of the reflected ultrasound signals when a transducer imposes ultrasound waves (pulse) to a material. It is difficult to differentiate if the reflected signal is induced from the defects, fiber content or the intermediate layers of GFRP composites. Most of the time, the drastic attenuation of signals could enshroud the modest changes in the reflected signals from defects. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of fiber orientation, thickness and delamination of GFRP composites on the rise time, pulse duration and attenuation ratio of the reflected ultrasound signal. The rise time, pulse duration and attenuation ratio of A-scan data was observed with respect to different positions of damage (delamination), thickness and stacking sequence of the lamina. It is essential to identify the significant factors that contribute to the abnormal characteristics of the reflected signals in which the defect is identified. Moreover, this paper presents the application of Taguchi method for maximizing the detection of defect in GFRP composites influenced by delamination. The optimum combination of the significant contributing factor for the signal’s abnormal characteristics and its effect on damage detection was obtained by using the analysis of signal-to-noise ratio. The finding of this study revealed that delamination is the most influential factor on the attenuation ratio.

Keywords

  • glass fiber reinforced plastics
  • ultrasonic testing
  • attenuation
  • delamination
Open Access

Bioactive core material for porous load-bearing implants

Published Online: 23 Oct 2012
Page range: 25 - 36

Abstract

Bioactive core material for porous load-bearing implants

So far state of knowledge on biodegradable materials is reviewed. Among a variety of investigated materials, those composed of polymers and ceramics may be considered as only candidates for a core material in porous titanium alloy. The collagen and chitosan among natural polymers, polyhydroxy acids among synthetic polymers, and hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate among ceramics are proposed for further research. Three essential conditions for a core material are defined as: biodegradation rate “in vitro” and “in vivo” close to bone tissue in-growth rate, high compression strength and ability to form nanoporous open structure inside the material for vascularisation. Possible deposition techniques of a core material within the macropores of metallic scaffold include infiltration of titanium porous structure with polymer scaffold followed by precipitation of phosphate nanoparticles, and mixing of phosphate and polymers before deposition followed by controlled precipitation inside the pores.

Keywords

  • biodegradation
  • polymers
  • ceramics

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