Magazine et Edition

Volume 27 (2021): Edition 1 (December 2021)

Volume 26 (2020): Edition 1 (June 2020)

Volume 25 (2019): Edition 1 (June 2019)

Volume 24 (2018): Edition 1 (June 2018)

Volume 23 (2017): Edition 1 (June 2017)

Volume 22 (2016): Edition 2 (December 2016)

Volume 22 (2016): Edition 1 (June 2016)

Volume 21 (2015): Edition 2 (December 2015)

Volume 20 (2014): Edition 2 (December 2014)

Volume 20 (2014): Edition 1 (June 2014)

Volume 19 (2013): Edition 2 (December 2013)

Volume 19 (2013): Edition 1 (May 2013)

Volume 18 (2012): Edition 2 (December 2012)

Volume 18 (2012): Edition 1 (July 2012)

Détails du magazine
Format
Magazine
eISSN
2353-0707
Première publication
19 Jul 2012
Période de publication
2 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

Chercher

Volume 24 (2018): Edition 1 (June 2018)

Détails du magazine
Format
Magazine
eISSN
2353-0707
Première publication
19 Jul 2012
Période de publication
2 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

Chercher

2 Articles
Accès libre

Circumstances and autopsy findings in drownings, Department of Forensic Medicine, Aarhus University, 2006-2015

Publié en ligne: 14 Feb 2019
Pages: 1 - 6

Résumé

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the demographic circumstances and the autopsy findings regarding drowning deaths autopsied at the Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Aarhus. The study is based on autopsy reports from the Department of Forensic Medicine in Aarhus, 2006-2015 with drowning as a cause of death. Among the 135 cases of the study, 87 (64.4%) were accidents versus 33 (24.4%) suicides. The study showed, that the majority of the drowned 73,3% were males, especially pronounced in the accidents (81.6% were males). In 60.7% victims, there was a positive blood alcohol analysis, most often in males. Females with positive alcohol analyses did however have the highest mean alcohol blood level (1.65 versus 1.47 per mile). The most frequent place of the submersions was docks (24.4%) and the most frequent time of day was in the evening (18.00 – 23.59; 19.3%) and at night (00.00 – 05.59; 20.0%). The study shows no significant connection between adipocere and type of water (OR=1.21, 95% CI (0.49;2.99), p=0.68), bulging lungs and type of water (OR=1.18, 95% CI (0.52;2.70), p=0.69), lung weight and type of water (z-test, p=0.38) and the amount of pleural effusion and water type (z-test, p=0.16). A significant connection between the presence of pleural effusion and type of water cannot discounted (OR=2.37, 95% CI (1.06;2.44), p=0.02).

Mots clés

  • drowning
  • emphysema
  • medico legal autopsy
  • alcohol
  • pleural effusion
  • lung weight
  • submersions
Accès libre

SURVIVE: let the dead help the living—an autopsy-based cohort study for mapping risk markers of death among those with severe mental illnesses

Publié en ligne: 14 Feb 2019
Pages: 7 - 17

Résumé

Abstract

Background: Forensic autopsy strategies may improve differential diagnostics both post-mortem and ante-mortem and aid in clinical settings concerning preventive efforts for premature mortality. Excess mortality and reduced life expectancy affect persons with severe mental illnesses (SMI) for multi-faceted reasons that remain controversial. Somatic conditions, medical treatment and lifestyle diseases, which are primarily examined in the living, contribute to premature deaths. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are unclear, though, and the benefits of a focused, standardised autopsy remain unproven. We have developed and implemented an optimised molecular–biological autopsy for deceased persons with SMI. Our aim is to map the occurrence of 1) somatic diseases and organ changes; 2) metabolic syndrome; 3) use and abuse of alcohol, pharmaceuticals and psychoactive substances; 4) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors in the metabolism of pharmaceuticals; and 5) genetic variations (acquired and/or congenital) in sudden cardiac death. Additionally, we hope to contribute to diagnostic treatments and preventive measures to benefit those living with SMI. Methods: SURVIVE: let the dead help the living is a prospective, autopsy-based study on 500 deceased persons with SMI subjected to forensic autopsies under the Danish Act on Forensic Inquests and Autopsy. The autopsies followed an extended, standardised autopsy protocol comprised of whole-body computed tomography scanning, magnetic resonance imaging of the heart and brain and an extended forensic autopsy, including a wide panel of analyses (toxicology, microbiology, genetics, histology and biochemical analysis). Additionally, post-mortem data were linked to ante-mortem health data extracted from Danish national health registers.

Discussion: The SURVIVE autopsy procedure, including tissue sampling and bio banking, has been shown to be effective. We expect that the SURVIVE study will provide unique opportunities to unravel the mechanisms and causes of premature death in persons with SMI. We also expect that identifying prognostic biomarkers for comorbidities will contribute to prevention of premature deaths and comorbidities in persons with SMI.

Mots clés

  • Expanded standardised autopsy procedure
  • molecular autopsy
  • extended biobanking
  • premature death markers
  • severe mental illness
2 Articles
Accès libre

Circumstances and autopsy findings in drownings, Department of Forensic Medicine, Aarhus University, 2006-2015

Publié en ligne: 14 Feb 2019
Pages: 1 - 6

Résumé

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the demographic circumstances and the autopsy findings regarding drowning deaths autopsied at the Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Aarhus. The study is based on autopsy reports from the Department of Forensic Medicine in Aarhus, 2006-2015 with drowning as a cause of death. Among the 135 cases of the study, 87 (64.4%) were accidents versus 33 (24.4%) suicides. The study showed, that the majority of the drowned 73,3% were males, especially pronounced in the accidents (81.6% were males). In 60.7% victims, there was a positive blood alcohol analysis, most often in males. Females with positive alcohol analyses did however have the highest mean alcohol blood level (1.65 versus 1.47 per mile). The most frequent place of the submersions was docks (24.4%) and the most frequent time of day was in the evening (18.00 – 23.59; 19.3%) and at night (00.00 – 05.59; 20.0%). The study shows no significant connection between adipocere and type of water (OR=1.21, 95% CI (0.49;2.99), p=0.68), bulging lungs and type of water (OR=1.18, 95% CI (0.52;2.70), p=0.69), lung weight and type of water (z-test, p=0.38) and the amount of pleural effusion and water type (z-test, p=0.16). A significant connection between the presence of pleural effusion and type of water cannot discounted (OR=2.37, 95% CI (1.06;2.44), p=0.02).

Mots clés

  • drowning
  • emphysema
  • medico legal autopsy
  • alcohol
  • pleural effusion
  • lung weight
  • submersions
Accès libre

SURVIVE: let the dead help the living—an autopsy-based cohort study for mapping risk markers of death among those with severe mental illnesses

Publié en ligne: 14 Feb 2019
Pages: 7 - 17

Résumé

Abstract

Background: Forensic autopsy strategies may improve differential diagnostics both post-mortem and ante-mortem and aid in clinical settings concerning preventive efforts for premature mortality. Excess mortality and reduced life expectancy affect persons with severe mental illnesses (SMI) for multi-faceted reasons that remain controversial. Somatic conditions, medical treatment and lifestyle diseases, which are primarily examined in the living, contribute to premature deaths. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are unclear, though, and the benefits of a focused, standardised autopsy remain unproven. We have developed and implemented an optimised molecular–biological autopsy for deceased persons with SMI. Our aim is to map the occurrence of 1) somatic diseases and organ changes; 2) metabolic syndrome; 3) use and abuse of alcohol, pharmaceuticals and psychoactive substances; 4) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors in the metabolism of pharmaceuticals; and 5) genetic variations (acquired and/or congenital) in sudden cardiac death. Additionally, we hope to contribute to diagnostic treatments and preventive measures to benefit those living with SMI. Methods: SURVIVE: let the dead help the living is a prospective, autopsy-based study on 500 deceased persons with SMI subjected to forensic autopsies under the Danish Act on Forensic Inquests and Autopsy. The autopsies followed an extended, standardised autopsy protocol comprised of whole-body computed tomography scanning, magnetic resonance imaging of the heart and brain and an extended forensic autopsy, including a wide panel of analyses (toxicology, microbiology, genetics, histology and biochemical analysis). Additionally, post-mortem data were linked to ante-mortem health data extracted from Danish national health registers.

Discussion: The SURVIVE autopsy procedure, including tissue sampling and bio banking, has been shown to be effective. We expect that the SURVIVE study will provide unique opportunities to unravel the mechanisms and causes of premature death in persons with SMI. We also expect that identifying prognostic biomarkers for comorbidities will contribute to prevention of premature deaths and comorbidities in persons with SMI.

Mots clés

  • Expanded standardised autopsy procedure
  • molecular autopsy
  • extended biobanking
  • premature death markers
  • severe mental illness

Planifiez votre conférence à distance avec Sciendo