1. bookTom 13 (2020): Zeszyt 1 (June 2020)
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License
Format
Czasopismo
eISSN
2029-0454
Pierwsze wydanie
05 Feb 2009
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2 razy w roku
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Angielski
Otwarty dostęp

Contemplating a Cyber Weapons Convention: An Exploration of Good Practice and Necessary Preconditions

Data publikacji: 23 Oct 2020
Tom & Zeszyt: Tom 13 (2020) - Zeszyt 1 (June 2020)
Zakres stron: 51 - 80
Otrzymano: 16 Apr 2020
Przyjęty: 14 Jul 2020
Informacje o czasopiśmie
License
Format
Czasopismo
eISSN
2029-0454
Pierwsze wydanie
05 Feb 2009
Częstotliwość wydawania
2 razy w roku
Języki
Angielski

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