1. bookTom 59 (2020): Zeszyt 3 (January 2020)
Informacje o czasopiśmie
License
Format
Czasopismo
eISSN
2545-3149
Pierwsze wydanie
01 Mar 1961
Częstotliwość wydawania
4 razy w roku
Języki
Angielski, Polski
Otwarty dostęp

Microbiological Causes Of Defects In Fetal Development And Miscarriage

Data publikacji: 12 Oct 2020
Tom & Zeszyt: Tom 59 (2020) - Zeszyt 3 (January 2020)
Zakres stron: 237 - 246
Otrzymano: 01 Mar 2020
Przyjęty: 01 Jul 2020
Informacje o czasopiśmie
License
Format
Czasopismo
eISSN
2545-3149
Pierwsze wydanie
01 Mar 1961
Częstotliwość wydawania
4 razy w roku
Języki
Angielski, Polski
Introduction

Human pregnancy lasts on average 280 days from the first day of the last menstruation or 266 days from the date of the last ovulation [2, 50]. The intrauterine (prenatal) development of a child may be adversely affected by teratogenic factors (teratogens), which are chemicals (e.g. many drugs, including aspirin, thalidomide, warfarin – an anticoagulant drug, methotrexate – a cytostatic drug, aminoglycoside antibiotics; vitamin A, mycotoxins), ionizing radiation (e.g. X, gamma) or microorganisms [14, 21, 23, 39]. The field of science that studies birth defects is teratology. Teratogenic microorganisms include some bacteria (e.g. Listeria monocytogenes, Treponema pallidum), viruses (e.g. rubella, HHV-1, HHV-2, HHV-3, HHV-4, HHV-5 – human herpesvirus 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ZIKV – Zika virus, parvovirus B19) and protozoa (Toxoplasma gondii) [1, 11, 13, 14, 46, 47, 53]. Teratogenic factors can contribute to the development of various birth defects in the body and to its death (miscarriage). These lesions can occur during gametogenesis (gametopathies), the period of blastocyst formation (blastopathies), embryo formation (embryopathies) or during the fetal period (fetopathies, from the second month of pregnancy).

The severity of the negative effects of teratogen depends on many factors, including the immune status of the mother’s organism, the type of pathogen or the developmental stage of the fetus (different stages of development of individual organs and body parts) the most dangerous infections are in the first trimester of pregnancy, because during this period external and internal organs are formed (morpho- and organogenesis). Preventive vaccines have been developed for some diseases (rubella and varicella) [1, 2, 11, 41, 47, 53]. Many pathogenic microorganisms can be transferred to the fetus during pregnancy, but not all of them (e.g. HIV – human immunodeficiency virus, HBV – hepatitis B virus, HCV – hepatitis C virus) exhibit typical teratogenic properties, i.e. they contribute to the development of congenital malformations or miscarriages.

Placenta

The placenta is an important, temporary organ that supplies the embryo and the fetus with oxygen and nutrients and it collects carbon dioxide and waste products (e.g. urea). Moreover, it produces hormones (e.g. hCG – human chorionic gonadotropin, hPL – human placental lactogen / hCS – human chorionic somatomammotropin, progesterone, estrogens) and constitutes a barrier (not always effective) protecting the fetus against pathogens. The placenta is formed from the chorion (the outer fetal membrane, formed from the germ layer – trophoblast) and the uterine mucosa (decidua). The pathomechanism of microbial penetration through the placenta is poorly understood [12, 50]. Cytotrophoblast cells (building the placenta) are more susceptible to infection than syncytiotrophoblast cells that differentiate later (between the second and third trimester of pregnancy) [12]. In the case of L. monocytogenes infection, it has been shown that syncytiotrophoblast cells degenerate (due to acute inflammation), which probably allows the transmission of the pathogen to the fetus [55].

Preterm delivery and vaginosis

Preterm delivery (PTD) is defined as the birth of a baby before the 37th week of pregnancy. In the event of a miscarriage, birth occurs before 22th week. In the USA, 20th week is considered the lower limit. If an intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) occurs without expulsion, this event is known as a missed miscarriage. Premature birth results, among others, in a low birth weight of the baby and may pose a threat to its health and life (e.g. due to poorly developed respiratory and immune systems). One of the many reasons for premature delivery may be infection of the amniotic fluid and membranes (usually ascending, may lead to pPROM – preterm premature rupture of membranes / PROM – premature rupture of membranes) and the fetus (usually transplacentary, less often by ascending route). In ascending infection, the microorganisms present in the vagina are transferred to the uterus [2, 11, 13, 19, 26, 41, 47].

A quite common type of vaginosis is bacterial vaginosis (BV), which is manifested by a decrease in the amount of Lactobacillus spp. (formerly called Döderlein bacteria) in the vagina in favor of other bacteria – often anaerobic. Preterm labor or miscarriage may occur if microbes are translocated from the vagina into the uterus. BV is endogenous and is caused, among others, by: Gardnerella vaginalis (can also cause infertility), Mobiluncus curtisii subsp. curtisii, M. curtisii subsp. holmesii, M. mulieris, mycoplasmas (Mycoplasma hominis, M. genitalium, Ureaplasma urealyticum, U. parvum), Bacteroides spp., Prevotella spp., Peptostreptococcus spp., Streptococcus agalactiae, Chlamydia trachomatis. These microorganisms (except for C. trachomatis) may constitute the vaginal microbiota, which makes microbiological diagnostics difficult. In the case of M. genitalium, there is discrepant information regarding whether this organism can induce preterm labor. Risk factors for bacterial vaginosis include improper hygiene, frequent change of partners and the follicular (proliferative) phase of the menstrual cycle. BV is often asymptomatic and may also result in: white or gray vaginal discharge (fishy / amine smell), itching of the vulva, dysuria (pain during micturition), alkalization of vaginal secretion (pH above 4.5 or 5). Various diagnostic criteria for vaginosis are used (e.g. according to Amsel, Nugent, Hay and Ison). The treatment includes, among others, metronidazole (a chemotherapeutic agent) and clindamycin (a semi-synthetic antibiotic). However, the implementation of pharmacotherapy does not always prevent PTD (discrepant data are available) [2, 11, 13, 19, 26, 47]. Preterm labor can also be caused by the protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis. This flagellate occurs all over the world, it can colonize the human urogenital (genitourinary) tract and causes one of the most common venereal diseases ‒ trichomoniasis [11, 13, 15].

TORCH group

TORCH (toxoplasmosis, other agents, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex) is an acronym for a group of infectious diseases (vertical transmission route), which during pregnancy may result in birth defects in the fetus (malformations, SNHL – sensorineural hearing loss, organ damage), premature childbirth (PTD) and miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction (synonyms: IUGR, hypotrophy / intrauterine hypoplasia) – results in low birth weight. Malformations are structural defects caused by disturbances in morphogenesis in the embryonic period. At the same time maternal infection can be either oligosymptomatic or asymptomatic. The TORCH group includes, among others: Toxoplasma gondii, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV – cytomegalovirus), herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), B19 virus, Treponema pallidum. Some protection of the fetus is provided by maternal antibodies (IgG class – immunoglobulin G) passing through the placenta [1, 5, 11, 20, 41, 47, 53]. Infection in a pregnant woman can be detected, inter alia, using serological tests (various techniques are used), genetic tests (e.g. PCR), isolation and cultivation of the pathogen (it can be time-consuming – especially in the case of viruses). Sometimes an invasive procedure of amniocentesis is used in the diagnosis. In ultrasound examination (USG – ultrasonography) – obligatory in many countries, including Poland – despite the low sensitivity and specificity of the method, various disorders in the development of the fetus can be observed, e.g. hydrocephaly, microcephaly, calcifications (e.g. intracranial, liver), ventriculomegaly (enlargement of the ventricles), malformations of the heart, limbs, IUGR, ascites, oligohydramnios and polyhydramnios (deficiency or excess fluid in the amniotic sac), placental edema. More accurate imaging can be obtained, among others, with the use of CT (computed tomography; X-rays are harmful to the fetus) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) [1, 2, 10, 11, 13, 20, 33, 46, 47, 54].

Teratogenic microorganisms and viruses
Bacteria

Among the pathogenic bacteria for humans, two species – Listeria monocytogenes and Treponema pallidum – pose the greatest threat to the health and life of the fetus.

L. monocytogenes are Gram-positive, relatively anaerobic, halotolerant (up to 10% or 30% NaCl) bacteria. They show polymorphism – bacteria, coccobacilli or elongated (filamentous forms). They do not produce spores and are motile (at 20–30°C). They can multiply in a wide temperature range (1–45°C, optimum 30–37°C). They are widespread in the natural environment (among others in soil, waters). They are also the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract of (most) mammals, birds and cold-blooded animals. It is estimated that 1–10% of the human population is carriers of these pathogen. These bacteria can also be detected in food (including raw milk). L. monocytogenes is a opportunistic pathogen for humans and animals. It is also a facultative intracellular parasite (it multiplies in enterocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, vascular endothelial cells and hepatocytes). The most common infections occur through food (plant and animal products), less often through contact with an animal (skin and eye infections in veterinarians). The incubation period for listeriosis lasts usually 10–70 days. The symptoms of the disease include: fever, diarrhea (watery and bloody), pain in the abdomen, muscles and joints; a more severe form of the disease may also occur (brain infection, meningitis – mortality up to 22%, sepsis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis) [2, 11, 13, 15, 21, 47, 51, 53].

L. monocytogenes infection can also occur during childbirth or pregnancy (most often in the third trimester, through the placenta or less frequently by the ascending route). Infection in pregnancy may, among others, result in premature labor, miscarriage, pneumonia in the fetus, formation of multiple abscesses in many organs (especially in the liver and spleen) [2, 11, 13, 21, 47, 51, 53].

The spirochaetes are Gram-negative bacteria with a spiral shape. The spirochetes include bacteria of the genera Borrelia, Treponema, Leptospira and Brachyspira. Their cells are thin (0.1–0.3 μm) and long (several to several hundred μm). They stain poorly by the Gram method. They can be stained with silver impregnation and observed in a dark-field microscope. They show the ability to perform a specific type of movement, resembling a contracting and stretching spring (the role of the axial filament). They are found in the environment (mainly fresh and salty waters), they are also commensals and parasites of animals and humans (e.g. Borellia spp. transmitted by ticks and lice). They grow in aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in a wide temperature range (25–42°C). In the case of many species of spirochetes, it was not possible to develop methods of their in vitro culture (e.g. T. pallidum). T. pallidum spirochetes are especially dangerous for the fetus [2, 11, 13, 47].

Treponema spp. are commensals in the oral cavity, the gastrointestinal tract and on the reproductive organs of humans and animals. A clinically important species in this genus is T. pallidum subsp. pallidum. These bacteria occur all over the world, are highly sensitive to dessication, disinfectants and die quickly outside the human body; in addition, they cause a clinically important sexually transmitted disease (STD) – syphilis (lues, syphilis). Syphilis is a chronic disease with a varied symptoms, in which the early and late (tertiary) stages are distinguished. Early stage of the syphilis includes: Primary stage – incubation period 9–90 days (usually 14–21), symptoms among others: bacteremia (bacteraemia), enlargement of lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy), skin changes at the site of pathogen penetration (painless nodules turning into ulcers, the so-called chancre) which later heals (after 2–6 weeks), Secondary stage – usually occurs after 9–10 weeks, symptoms among others: fever, muscle aches, sore throat, loss of appetite, swollen lymph nodes, generalized maculopapular rash on the skin and mucous membranes (it disappears over time and infections goes into a latent state).

Tertiary syphilis appears several years after the infection. In this phase of the disease, pathological changes occur in various tissues and organs (including the circulatory and nervous systems), resulting from, inter alia, chronic inflammation and the formation of syphilomas (nodular lesions of various locations, including internal organs). In the tertiary syphilis, the following symptoms may occur: arteritis, paralysis, dementia and loss of vision [2, 11, 13, 15, 46, 47].

T. pallidum infection can also occur during childbirth (perinatal infection) or during pregnancy (90% risk of transplacental infection). Infection in pregnancy may cause for example: IUGR, fetal edema, hepatosplenomegaly (enlarged liver and spleen), haemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, multiple organ damage, bone changes, premature delivery, miscarriage; later, the child may develop the Hutchinson triad (deformed incisors, hearing impairment, interstitial keratitis) [2, 13, 46, 47].

Less numerous studies indicate that Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes (transmitted by ticks, causing borrelia / Lyme disease) may also have a negative effect on pregnancy and the fetus. It has been suggested that these bacteria are responsible, e.g. for: the formation of angiomas (neoplasms within the blood vessels), PTD, miscarriages, loss of vision, syndactyly (grown together fingers), malformations of the heart and the genitourinary system [2, 18, 52].

Protozoa

Protozoa are an artificial taxon of unicellular eukaryotes (Eukaryota domain) belonging to the kingdom of Protista. Some protozoa are pathogenic to animals and humans [11, 13].

Toxoplasma gondii is a worldwide, strictly intracellular parasite of the wild, farm and domestic warm-blooded animals. This protozoan also infects humans. Toxoplasmosis is one of the most common parasitic diseases and zoonoses in humans (infection often occurs in childhood). The seroprevalence of infections varies from country to country (30–50% on average), can be as high as 90% and is particularly high in underdeveloped countries. Three main genotypes of this protozoan (I–III) were distinguished, of which I is the most virulent. The life cycle of T. gondii is complex. The final hosts are domestic cats (Felis catus) and other felids which, after infection, shed oocysts in the faeces over a period of several weeks (especially in the initial stage of infection). Less than 30% of cats excrete oocysts in their faeces after ingesting tachyzoites or oocysts, while almost all of them excrete them after consuming meat containing tissue cysts. Oocysts are round or oval in shape and contain from a few to 10 000 bradyzoites (some authors use the term sporozoites). Bradyzoites are one of the developmental forms of T. gondii, similar to trophozoites (tachyzoites), but e.g. they show a slower metabolism, are less sensitive to gastric juice and form tissue cysts in the host’s tissues. Cysts can arise in muscles (skeletal and heart), the central nervous system (brain, spinal cord), retina, lungs, kidneys and liver. They are detected in different numbers in various tissues and organs depending on the species of the host. Cysts stimulate the development of lasting immunity, do not cause local inflammatory responses or functional disorders and remain in the body for long periods (many months, potentially for the life). Cats become infected with T. gondii by ingesting oocysts or by ingesting flesh from infected intermediate hosts (cxontaining bradyzoites or tachyzoites), e.g. rodents (including mice), birds. In the epithelial cells of the intestine oocysts transform into trophozoites, which are able to move and can enter cells by active penetration or phagocytosis. Through the bloodstream trophozoites are transferred to various tissues and organs of the host (where they turn into bradyzoites) or through sexual reproduction they can produce new oocysts in the intestines, which are excreted in the faeces [1, 2, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 23, 44, 46, 48, 54].

Human becomes infected with this protozoan through contact with cat faeces, working in the field and garden (in moist soil or sand oocysts stay viable for up to 18 months), eating unwashed vegetables and fruit, raw or undercooked meat of infected animals (often in mutton, differentiated carrier-state in pigs <1% –100%, also found in game and poultry), drinking raw milk (especially goat milk, also sheep milk) or contaminated water. There is a possibility of infection through blood transfusion. Heat treatment or deep-freezing destroys the bradyzoites in the meat. Infection can occur in the womb as tachyzoites can cross the placenta. Most cases of infection are asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and do not require treatment. Sometimes young children or immunocompromised people (e.g. those with AIDS) develop lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, fever, weakness, headache, muscle aches, meningitis, chorioretinitis, inflammation of the liver, heart muscle, lungs [1, 2, 7, 9, 1113, 15, 17, 23, 44, 46, 48, 54].

T. gondii does not pose a significant threat to people with an efficient immune system (immunocompetent). However, it is especially dangerous for the fetus after the mother’s primary contact with the parasite (infection in pregnancy). This parasite can cause fetal lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, ascites, anemia, thrombocytopenia, jaundice, hydrocephaly, microcephaly, the Sabin-Pinkerton triad (chorioretinitis – often affects the blind spot, intracranial calcifications, ventriculomegaly), cataract, inflammation of the kidneys, bones and periosteum, cartilage, meningitidis, IUGR, miscarriage (less common). The greatest risk of birth defects occurs in the early stages of pregnancy. The likelihood of infecting the fetus is then low and increases with time. About 90% of infections are asymptomatic in newborns. However, later in the child’s life, there can occur learning difficulties, mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, strabismus, deterioration of vision (with loss of vision) and hearing. The introduction of antibiotic treatment in pregnancy (spiramycin / rovamycin) reduces the risk of fetal defects [1, 2, 7, 9, 1113, 15, 17, 23, 44, 46, 48, 54].

Viruses

Viruses are infectious agents classified as strictly intracellular pathogens, i.e. those that are unable to multiply outside the cells of the macroorganism – the host. They are made of proteins and nucleic acids (DNA or RNA – single or double stranded). Sometimes a virus particle (virion) contains a lipid envelope derived from an infected cell – a fragment of the cell membrane (most often), nuclear membraneor endoplasmic reticulum. So far, few drugs effective in combating viral infections have been developed, among others, due to the low complexity of the structure and the lack of own metabolism (few potential sites for drug action) [11, 13, 15].

Herpesviruses

The Herpesviridae family is a large group of viruses that are pathogenic to humans and animals. The virions of these viruses contain dsDNA (double-stranded DNA), show icosahedral symmetry and have a lipid envelope. Herpes infections are latent. Latent viruses can be reactivated as a result of stress, exposure to sunlight or a decrease in immunity. Presumably the carrier state is life-long. They may be carcinogenic – e.g. HHV-8 (Kaposi’s sarcoma virus; human herpes virus 8). Cytomegaloviruses (CMV), herpes simplex viruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2), varicella-zoster virus (VZV) can cause birth defects in the fetus [11, 13, 15].

CMV (HHV-5) is a widespread human and animal herpes virus. It is transmitted through various body secretions (e.g. saliva, urine, semen, cervical secretions, breast milk) and blood. Primary virus infection (usually asymptomatic) most often occurs at a young age (< 3 years). The virus infects the epithelial tissue cells, then enters the bloodstream and infects monocytes. CMV is tropic to many types of tissues (e.g. epithelial, hematopoietic) and cells (e.g. monocytes and macrophages, neutrophils, vascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts, neurons, smooth muscle myocytes, hepatocytes). This virus causes a cytopathic effect (CPE) in the form of a change in cell morphology (increased size) and the formation of inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm and nucleus (CID – cytomegalic inlusion disease). Secondary infection is common in adolescents and is manifested by fever, enlarged lymph nodes, splenomegaly, hepatic impairment (jaundice is rare). In addition, atypical lymphocytes can be observed in the blood. After infection, the virus remains latent in the CD34+ bone marrow stem cells (cluster of differentiation 34), monocytes and dendritic cells. Subsequent reactivation of a latent virus is usually asymptomatic. Ganciclovir and valganciclovir are efficient in the treatment of CMV infections [1, 2, 5, 11, 13, 17, 38, 41, 45, 46].

CMV can cause perinatal (less common) or intrauterine (more common) infections. With primary maternal infection, the risk of viral transmission to the fetus is estimated at 40%, with secondary – 0.5–1.5%. Infection may result in: fetal edema, ascites, miscarriage, microcephaly, brain damage (including ventriculomegaly and the appearance of periventricular calcification), hepatosplenomegaly, calcification in the liver, chorioretinitis, SNHL (usually bilateral, damage to the Corti organ and of the vestibulocochlear nerve), IUGR, ecchymosis, thrombocytopenia [1, 2, 5, 10, 1113, 17, 38, 41, 45, 46].

The herpes simplex virus is widespread in the human population. It is transmitted through direct contact, body secretions and objects contaminated with these secretions, through inhalation (droplets), blood. There are two species of this virus:

HSV-1 (HHV-1) – mainly causes cold sores (herpes labialis) – vesicular lesions on the skin, filled with serous content (sometimes also changes on the oral mucosa). Less commonly, the infection affects the conjunctiva or the cornea (may lead to blindness). Primary infection mainly in childhood (usually asymptomatic), HSV-2 (HHV-2) – mainly causes genital herpes – manifested in the form of vesicular lesions. Primary infection more severe than secondary. Infection with this virus is one of the most common venereal diseases [1, 2, 5, 11, 13, 41, 46].

After primary infection, herpes viruses remain latent in the posterior root ganglia of the trigeminal nerve (V cranial nerve) and/or in the posterior (dorsal) lumbosacral nerves, causing recurrent infections thereafter. HSV-1 and HSV-2 can also infect the nervous system, causing meningitis (HSV-2, usually mild), encephalitis (HSV-1, usually involving the temporal lobe, more severe) and infect the fetus. However, perinatal infections occur more frequently (80–90% of cases, they may be severe) than transplacental infections. In primary maternal infection, the risk of transmission to the fetus is estimated at 50% (only 0–3% for recurrent infections). Infection of the fetus may result in miscarriage, IUGR, shortened duration of pregnancy and hearing impairment (rarely) [1, 2, 5, 11, 13, 41, 46]. Few studies indicate the possible occurrence of the following complications, such as: microcephaly, intracranial calcification, chorioretinitis and microphthalmia [2, 46].

The varicella-zoster virus (VZV / HHV-3) is a worldwide pathogen. There are at least seven genotypes of this virus that do not differ significantly in antigenic terms. Chickenpox (varicella) is a disease that is transmitted through airborne droplets and direct contact. It occurs most often in winter and early spring. Smallpox is less frequently detected in tropical climate regions, possibly due to the instability of the virus at elevated temperatures. The disease mainly affects children and manifests itself with a slight fever, vesicular lesions on the skin and mucous membranes. A more severe course of the disease occurs when an adult is infected (primary infection). High fever, hepatitis and brain inflammation may then occur. The virus initially replicates in the epithelial cells of the nasopharynx or the conjunctiva of the eye and then enters the surrounding lymph nodes. About two weeks after infection viremia (the presence of the virus in the blood) occurs and the pathogen infects the skin cells, causing a rash (initially macular, then papular and itchy). Persistent immunity remains after, but the virus remains latent in the neurons of the spinal cord sensory ganglia or in the cells of the cranial nerves. This virus can later reactivate, causing shingles/zoster (frequency independent of the season). This disease manifests itself as a rash on the skin (usually on the trunk, less often in other places) and neuralgia. Neuralgia may persist for a long time, even several years. In rare cases the ocular form of herpes zoster may occur [1, 2, 5, 11, 13, 33, 41, 46].

In the event of primary infection in pregnant women, the varicella virus may be transmitted to the fetus, which may (in rare cases) result in premature birth, miscarriage, birth defects or the death of the baby. Congenital abnormalities (CVS) include: scarring changes on the skin (70% of cases), microcephaly, brain damage (including the cerebral cortex), hydrocephaly, chorioretinitis, microphthalmia, cataract, ocular ataxia (nystagmus), hypoplasia (incomplete development) of the limbs and muscles, IUGR, SNHL, ascites, malformations of the heart, ears or digestive system (less common), soft tissue calcification. There is probably a higher risk of fetal death if the fetus is male (65–85% of babies born with CVS are female; CVS – congenital varicella syndrome). A preventive vaccine is available. In the case of primary infection in pregnancy, therapy with immune serum (containing anti-VZV antibodies) or the use of antiviral drugs (aciclovir, valaciclovir) may possibly reduce the risk of fetal infection [1, 2, 5, 10, 11, 13, 33, 41, 46, 53].

The few research results indicate that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV / HHV-4) may also have a negative effect on pregnancy and the fetus. Infection spread through direct contact and is common (over 90% of the population). EBV infection in early life is asymptomatic, while in adolescence it may take the form of infectious mononucleosis (Pfeiffer’s disease) with fever, sore throat, enlargement of lymph nodes (mainly cervical), spleen, liver (less often). This virus exhibits carcinogenic properties (Burkitt’s lymphoma, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, other lymphomas, nasopharyngeal cancer) and tropism mainly in relation to B lymphocytes. Two genotypes of Epstein-Barr virus are distinguished: 1 (dominant in the world), 2 (endemic in Africa and Papua-New Guinea) [2, 11, 13]. It has been suggested that this herpesvirus may cause, inter alia, PTD, miscarriage, heart defects, cataract [2, 8, 49].

Other viruses

The B19 virus (parvovirus B19) is a small, worldwide, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) virus, classified in the Parvoviridae family. The virion of this pathogen shows icosahedral symmetry and is not enveloped. There are three genotypic variants of this virus:

– the most common cause of infections,

– occasionally causing infections (occurs mainly in Europe and North America),

– the rarest cause of infections, detected in Africa (but also occurs in other continents) [1, 2, 11, 22, 46].

The B19 virus replicates only in rapidly dividing cells and has an affinity for the P antigen of the blood group system. It infects erythrocytes (RBC – red blood cell), erythroblasts (erythrocyte precursor cells in the bone marrow), megakaryoblasts and megakaryocytes (thrombocyte precursor cells) and cells of the heart muscle, endothelium, liver, lungs, kidneys. The virus is transmitted mainly by airborne droplets and is most commonly infects children, often in late winter and early spring. Infection in childhood is called fifth disease, erythema infectious, slap baby syndrome. In children symptoms of the disease include a rash on the cheeks (including the trunk and limbs) and flu-like symptoms. In adults the infection may be asymptomatic or flu-like symptoms and symmetrical polyarthritis (e.g. metacarpus, knee, wrist, elbow, interphalangeal joints) may occur. Due to the affinity of the B19 virus to erythrocytes, infections are particularly dangerous for people suffering from various forms of anemia. Patients not suffering from anemia and with a healthy immune system usually do not require treatment. The infection leaves life-lasting immunity [1, 2, 11, 22, 43, 46].

Parvovirus B19 can be transmitted through direct contact with the secretions of the respiratory tract from the infected person, blood and blood products (through transfusion) and placenta. In the case of primary maternal infection, the risk of virus transmission to the fetus is estimated at 30–60% (1st trimester – 14%, 2nd – 50%, 3rd > 60%). Infection may lead to miscarriage, fetal edema (can be detected using USG), less commonly to myocarditis and birth defects. The B19 virus has a weak teratogenic effect, however, it can cause central nervous system (CNS), craniofacial and eyes defects (microphthalmia, malformation of the iris and lens of the eye, damage to the cornea). The causes of miscarriage in B19 infection are poorly understood. They are probably associated with multi-organ damage to the fetus. The greatest risk of pregnancy loss is in the first half of pregnancy. In the event of fetal edema, intra-fetal blood transfusion significantly reduces the risk of the child’s death [1, 2, 11, 22, 43, 46].

The Rubella virus is a widespread, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus with an icosahedral capsid structure, belonging to the Togaviridae family. The RNA of this virus is positively stranded – it can function as an mRNA. Viral replication inhibits mitosis in cells (due to damage to the cytoskeleton) and causes apoptosis. Infection with this pathogen occurs through droplets and vertically. Most infections occur in childhood. In children the course of rubella is mild and the symptoms are not very specific. Rash (starts with the face and continues on the limbs and torso), swollen glands, fever are observed. In adult, infection may be asymptomatic or may include decreased appetite, nausea, joint pain (caused by inflammation), mild fever, conjunctivitis, sore throat and swollen lymph nodes. Infection leaves life-lasting immunity. In the case of congenital rubella (CRS, Gregg’s syndrome) miscarriage (less common), IUGR, microcephaly, damage to the CNS, liver, kidneys, hearing (bilateral SNHL caused by damage to the cochlea and Corti organ, may occur later in life), defects of the heart, eyes (e.g. cataract, glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa), hepatosplenomegaly, pulmonary vascular stenosis are observed. The pathogenesis of birth defects is poorly understood. The most dangerous are fetal infections in the first trimester of pregnancy; thereafter, the risk of fetal defects decreases significantly. A combination vaccine is available to protect against the rubella virus (MMR – measles, mumps, rubella). Due to the fact that this vaccine contains attenuated pathogens, it is contraindicated to use it during pregnancy and in the period before pregnancy [1, 2, 5, 10, 11, 13, 17, 27, 41, 46, 53].

The Zika virus (ZIKV) was discovered in 1947 in macaques in Africa. The virion of this flavivirus contains ssRNA (positive polarity), exhibits icosahedral symmetry and has an envelope. ZIKV is mainly transmitted by mosquitoes (especially Aedes aegypti, A. albopictus) and therefore is classified as arbovirus. Mosquitoes can transmit ZIKV from infected animals, including humans. Other confirmed routes of transmission are sexual contact and animal biting. ZIKV infections have been observed all over the world. This virus is endemic in Africa, Asia, South and Central America. The Zika virus in adults usually causes a mild, short-term infection with not very specific symptoms. There is an itchy rash (macular or maculopapular), mild fever, arthritis (with swelling), muscle pain, headache, lymphadenopathy, conjunctivitis, nausea, weakness. A rare complication attributed to ZIKV infection in adult patients is Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) with acute inflammatory demyelination in the CNS. The described virus gets into body fluids – saliva, urine, semen and milk. Serological diagnosis of the infection is difficult due to the antigenic similarity of ZIKV with other flaviviruses. PCR is used as the “gold standard” in diagnostics. There are two main lines of ZIKV evolution: African, Asian (it also causes infections in South America). Infection prevention includes the use of mosquito repellants and the control of the mosquito population in the environment. Scientific papers published in recent years indicate that the Zika virus exhibits neurotropism, can penetrate the placenta (also multiply in its cells) and cause various birth defects (CZS – congenital Zika syndrome) in a child. The most common disorders are: microcephaly, microencephaly (small brain), ventriculomegaly, calcifications in the brain tissue (in the cortical and subcortical centers), lissencephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia. The areas of the brain most affected by the disease are the cerebral cortex, thalamus and hypothalamus. Other complications of infection in pregnancy include: miscarriage, damage to eyesight (damage to the retina, choroid, iris, lens, optic nerve, cataract), hearing, IUGR, internal hydrocephalus, damage to the spinal cord [3, 16, 20, 24, 25, 28, 32, 35, 37, 40, 42, 5658].

Few scientific publications indicate that the following pathogens may also have a negative effect on pregnancy and the fetus:

measles virus (Paramyxoviridae) – ssRNA virus (negative polarity), transmitted by airborne droplets and direct contact. It causes a cytopathic effect (CPE) in the form of syncytia (multinucleated cells created by the fusion of mononuclear cells). Measles is manifested by rash, lymphopenia (decrease in the number of lymphocytes in the blood), coughing, sneezing, rhinitis, fever. A complication of measles may be laryngitis, bronchitis, lung disease, middle ear inflammation, brain inflammation and meningitidis. Currently, the disease is rare due to the introduction of obligatory preventive vaccinations [2, 11, 13]. Presumably measles virus infection may result in PTD, miscarriage and IUGR [2, 30].

influenza viruses (Orthomyxoviridae) – ssRNA viruses (negative polarity). There are three main types of these viruses: A (infects humans, birds, pigs), B and C (infects humans). Type D causes infections in cattle. RNA types A and B are divided into eight segments, the remaining ones into seven. Type A further includes subtypes based on haemagglutinin and neuraminidase (e.g. H1N1). Influenza viruses are transmitted by airborne droplets, direct contact and through objects. The greatest number of cases is observed during autumn and winter. A preventive vaccine is available. Influenza viruses are characterized by high antigenic variability [2, 11, 13]. It has been suggested that they can cause PTD, miscarriage and IUGR [2, 6, 36].

Mycotoxins

Mycotoxins are a group of substances with various chemical structures, relatively low molecular weight, showing low sensitivity to high temperature (they are thermostable). They are metabolites of fungi belonging to the genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, Alternaria, Byssochlamys, Stachybotrys. One species of fungus may produce more than one type of mycotoxin. The following factors have the greatest influence on the production of mycotoxins by fungi: humidity (relative air humidity > 70% stimulate and the humidity > 15% in the plant product), temperature and the presence of accompanying microbiota (inhibitory effect). Low temperature slows mold growth but do not inhibit the production of toxins. It has been shown that, especially in the case of fungi of the genus Fusarium, low temperature increases the production of mycotoxins. The described substances show toxic effects in humans and animals (including cyto-, hepato-, nephro- and neurotoxic), mutagenic, carcinogenic (they cause, among others, HCC – hepatocellular carcinoma), teratogenic, allergenic; they also disturb the functioning of the immune and endocrine systems (e.g. zearalenone – estrogenic effect). According to the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization), around 25% of agricultural products (e.g. seeds, nuts, fruits, vegetables) in the world can be contaminated with these toxins. Mycotoxins may be present in animal products (milk and its products, meat, eggs) if farm animals were fed with contaminated feed [4, 11, 21, 23, 29, 31, 34, 39]. Mycotoxins enter the body mainly through food. Penetration through the skin and respiratory tract is of less importance. In terms of toxicology, the most important are: aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, patulin, sterigmatocystin, fumonisins and trichothecenes. Mycotoxin poisoning is called mycotoxicosis and can be acute or chronic. However, acute poisoning in developed countries and temperate climates are rare and more often affects farm animals. Children are more sensitive to the harmful effects of mycotoxins. The mechanism of the toxic action is diverse, e.g.: inhibition of the protein synthesis or DNA replication in the cells, mutation in the genome. Aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, fumonisins, and sterigmatocystin show mutagenic and carcinogenic effects (confirmed or probable). For patulin conflicting data regarding the carcinogenicity are available. The most susceptible organ to carcinogenesis is the liver due to its important role in the metabolism of xenobiotics. For aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, patulin fetal toxicity data are available. There are no specific antidotes for mycotoxins, therefore symptomatic treatment is applied in poisoning. Measures to prevent poisoning should include: the use of fungicides, proper storage of food products (e.g. appropriate temperature, humidity, microbiological air purity), testing of food for the presence of microscopic fungi and their toxins. Mycotoxins in food products can be detected using chromatographic methods (e.g. HPLC – high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, TLC – thin-layer chromatography), fluorescence detection in UV (ultraviolet) light [4, 11, 21, 23, 29, 31, 34, 39].

Description of selected mycotoxins

Aflatoxins are the first discovered and best known group of mycotoxins. They are produced by the fungi Aspergillus parasiticus, A. flavus, A. nomius, A. niger, A. bombycis, A. ochraceoroseus. They are characterized by low sensitivity to high temperature. The main varieties of aflatoxins are: B1 and B2 (they show blue fluorescence in UV), G1 and G2 (green fluorescence in UV), M1 and M2 (hydroxylated metabolites B1 and B2 which pass into the milk of animals). Aflatoxins show hepatotoxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic (cause, among others, liver tumors) and teratogenic effects. The presented toxins are detected in nuts (including peanuts), corn, soybeans, dried fruit, coffee beans, milk, cheese, butter, meat, eggs [4, 11, 21, 23, 29, 31, 34, 39].

Ochratoxin A (OTA – ochratoxin A) is a thermostable mycotoxin with a peptide structure, produced mainly by Penicillium verrucosum (temperate and cool climate) and Aspergillus ochraceus (warm and tropical climate) molds. OTA shows the strongest activity in the ochratoxin group. Other species producing this toxin are: P. viridicatum, P. palitans, P. cyclopium, P. nordicum, A. carbonarius, A. niger. Ochratoxin A shows nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic (causing e.g. kidney tumors) and teratogenic effects. It also disrupts the functioning of the immune system. This toxin occurs mainly in cereals (barley, corn, wheat, rice) and their products; also in bread, nuts (eg pecans, peanuts, Brazil nuts), coffee beans, spices, dried fruit, wine, beer, meat (e.g. pork, poultry), fish [4, 29, 31, 34, 39].

Patulin is a thermostable mycotoxin (with the structure of a two-ring lactone) produced, among others, by the fungi Penicillium expansum, P. patulum, P. cyclopium, Aspergillus clavatus, Byssochlamys fulva. Ingested patulin causes liver damage and gastrointestinal ulceration. It also has negative effects on the fetus. There are divergent data on the carcinogenic properties of this toxin. Patulin is found mainly in apples and derivative products (e.g. juices), less frequently in other fruits and vegetables (pears, grapes, apricots, bananas, tomatoes). In the process of fermentation of plant material, patulin is partially degraded [21, 31, 39].

Summary

Many factors can have a negative impact on the proper course of pregnancy. Apart from genetic factors, an important group are infectious and parasitic diseases (especially in underdeveloped countries). Among the numerous microorganisms with teratogenic properties, there are those traditionally included in the TORCH group, as well as the new ones of increasing importance (ZIKV). The TORCH group includes various microorganisms, both bacteria, viruses and protozoa. Less attention is paid to the risks of mycotoxins. Their negative impact on the proper development of the fetus is insufficiently studied. Miscarriages and birth defects of the fetus with a microbiological basis can be prevented by performing serological screening tests, microbiological tests (colonization of the genital tract), food analysis for the presence of mycotoxins and fungi, the use of preventive vaccinations (in the case of rubella and varicella) and educating the society about the potential risks and prophylaxis. The importance of prophylactic measures is emphasized by the fact that pathogens infections and mycotoxin poisoning in the mother may often be oligosymptomatic or asymptomatic. Despite its low specificity, the ultrasonography is helpful in the diagnosis of various pathological conditions of fetal development. However, not all fetal developmental abnormalities can be observed with this technique (e.g. hearing impairment).

Wprowadzenie

Ciąża u człowieka trwa średnio 280 dni, licząc od pierwszego dnia ostatniej menstruacji lub 266 dni, licząc od daty ostatniej owulacji [2, 50]. Na wewnątrzmaciczny rozwój (prenatalny) dziecka mogą mieć ujemny wpływ czynniki teratogenne (teratogeny), które stanowią substancje chemiczne (np. wiele leków w tym aspiryna, talidomid, warfaryna – lek przeciwzakrzepowy, metotreksat – lek cytostatyczny, antybiotyki aminoglikozydowe; witamina A, mikotoksyny), promieniowanie jonizujące (np. X / RTG – rentgenogram, gamma) czy drobnoustroje [14, 21, 23, 39]. Dziedziną nauki zajmującą się badaniem wad wrodzonych jest teratologia. Do drobnoustrojów wykazujących działanie teratogenne zalicza się niektóre bakterie (np. Listeria monocytogenes, Treponema pallidum – krętek blady), wirusy (np. różyczki, HHV-1, HHV-2, HHV-3, HHV-4, HHV-5 – human herpesvirus 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ZIKV – Zika virus, parwowirus B19) i pierwotniaki (Toxoplasma gondii) [1, 11, 13, 14, 46, 47, 53]. Czynniki teratogenne mogą przyczyniać się do rozwoju różnych wad wrodzonych u organizmu oraz do jego śmierci (poronienie). Uszkodzenia te mogą powstawać podczas gametogenezy (gametopatie), w okresie tworzenia blastocysty (blastopatie), podczas formowania się zarodka (embriopatie) lub w okresie płodowym (fetopatie, od drugiego miesiąca ciąży). Nasilenie ujemnych skutków działania teratogenu uwarunkowane jest wieloma czynnikami, m.in. stanem odporności organizmu matki, rodzajem patogenu czy stanem rozwoju płodu (różne okresy rozwoju poszczególnych narządów i części ciała); najgroźniejsze są zakażenia w pierwszym trymestrze ciąży, gdyż w tym okresie tworzone są narządy zewnętrzne i wewnętrzne (morfo- i organogeneza). W przypadku niektórych chorób (różyczce i ospie wietrznej) opracowano szczepionki [1, 2, 11, 41, 47, 53]. Wiele drobnoustrojów chorobotwórczych może podczas ciąży zostać przeniesionych na płód, ale nie wszystkie z nich (np. HIV – human immunodeficiency virus, HBV – hepatitis B virus, HCV – hepatitis C virus) wykazują typowe właściwości teratogenne, tj. przyczyniają się do rozwoju wad wrodzonych lub poronień.

Łożysko

Łożysko stanowi ważny, przejściowy narząd zaopatrujący zarodek i płód w tlen i substancje odżywcze oraz odbierający dwutlenek węgla i zbędne produkty przemiany materii (np. mocznik). Ponadto, wytwarza hormony (np. hCG – human chorionic gonadotropin, hPL – human placental lactogen / hCS – human chorionic somatomammotropin, progesteron, estrogeny) oraz stanowi barierę (nie zawsze skuteczną) chroniącą płód przed patogenami. Łożysko powstaje z kosmówki (zewnętrznej błony płodowej, powstającej z warstwy zarodkowej – trofoblastu) oraz z błony śluzowej macicy (doczesnej). Patomechanizm przenikania drobnoustrojów przez łożysko jest słabo poznany [12, 50]. Komórkom cytotrofoblastu (budującym łożysko) przypisuje się większą podatność na zakażenie niż różnicującym się później (między drugim i trzecim trymestrem ciąży) komórkom syncytiotrofoblastu [12]. W przypadku zakażenia L. monocytogenes wykazano, że dochodzi do degeneracji komórek syncytiotrofoblastu (na wskutek ostrego stanu zapalnego), co prawdopodobnie umożliwia transmisję patogenu na płód [55].

Poród przedwczesny i waginoza

Porodem przedwczesnym (PTD – preterm delivery) określa się urodzenie dziecka przed 37. tygodniem ciąży. W przypadku poronienia do porodu dochodzi przed 22. tygodniem. W USA za dolną granicę przyjmuje się 20. tydzień. Jeśli dojdzie do wewnątrzmacicznego obumarcia płodu (IUFD – intrauterine fetal death) bez jego wydalenia, wtedy taki stan nazywany jest poronieniem zatrzymanym (chybionym). Poród przedwczesny skutkuje, m.in., niską masą urodzeniową dziecka i może stanowić zagrożenie dla jego zdrowia i życia (np. ze względu na słabo wykształcony układ oddechowy i immunologiczny). Jedną z wielu przyczyn porodu przed planowanym terminem może być zakażenie płynu owodniowego i błon płodowych (zwykle drogą wstępującą, może prowadzić do pPROM – preterm premature rupture of membranes / PROM – premature rupture of membranes) oraz płodu (zazwyczaj drogą transplacentarną, rzadziej wstępującą). W zakażeniu wstępującym dochodzi do przeniesienia drobnoustrojów obecnych w pochwie do macicy [2, 11, 13, 19, 26, 41, 47].

Dość często występującym typem waginozy jest bakteryjna waginoza (BV – bacterial vaginosis), która objawia się spadkiem ilości pałeczek kwasu mlekowego Lactobacillus spp. (kiedyś nazywane pałeczkami Döderleina) w pochwie na korzyść innych bakterii – często beztlenowych. Jeśli dojdzie do translokacji drobnoustrojów z pochwy do macicy, to może dojść do porodu przedwczesnego lub poronienia. BV ma charakter endogenny i wywołana jest, m.in., przez: Gardnerella vaginalis (może też powodować bezpłodność), Mobiluncus curtisii subsp. curtisii, M. curtisii subsp. holmesii, M. mulieris, mikoplazmy (Mycoplasma hominis, M. genitalium, Ureaplasma urealyticum, U. parvum), Bacteroides spp., Prevotella spp., Peptostreptococcus spp., Streptococcus agalactiae, Chlamydia trachomatis. Wymienione drobnoustroje (z wyjątkiem C. trachomatis) mogą stanowić mikrobiotę pochwy, co utrudnia diagnostykę mikrobiologiczną. W przypadku M. genitalium dostępne są rozbieżne informacje, czy ten drobnoustrój może wywołać poród przedwczesny. Czynniki ryzyka bakteryjnej waginozy to, m.in., niewłaściwa higiena, częsta zmiana partnerów, folikularna (proliferacyjna) faza cyklu menstruacyjnego. BV niejednokrotnie jest bezobjawowa, jak również może skutkować: upławami o białym lub szarym kolorze (rybi / aminowy zapach), swędzeniem sromu, dysurią (bólem przy mikcji), alkalizacją wydzieliny z pochwy (pH powyżej 4,5 lub 5). Stosuje się różne kryteria diagnostyczne waginozy (m.in. według Amsela, Nugenta, Haya i Isona). W leczeniu wykorzystywane są, m.in., metronidazol (chemioterapeutyk) i klindamycyna (antybiotyk półsyntetyczny). Jednak wdrożenie farmakoterapii nie zawsze zapobiega PTD (dostępne rozbieżne dane) [2, 11, 13, 19, 26, 47]. Poród przedwczesny może wywołać również pierwotniak Trichomonas vaginalis (rzęsistek pochwowy). Ten wiciowiec występuje na całym świecie, może kolonizować drogi moczowo-płciowe człowieka i powoduje jedną z najczęstszych chorób wenerycznych – trichomonozę (rzęsistkowicę) [11, 13, 15].

Grupa TORCH

TORCH (toxoplasmosis, other agents, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex) stanowi akronim grupy chorób zakaźnych (pionowa / wertykalna droga transmisji), które podczas ciąży mogą skutkować wadami wrodzonymi u płodu (malformacjami, SNHL – sensorineural hearing loss, uszkodzeniem narządów), porodem przedwczesnym (PTD) i poronieniem, wewnątrzmacicznym zahamowaniem wzrostu (synonimy: IUGR – intrauterine growth restriction, hipotrofia / hipoplazja wewnątrzmaciczna) – skutkuje niską masą urodzeniową. Malformacje stanowią wady budowy spowodowane przez zaburzenia morfogenezy w okresie embrionalnym (zarodkowym). Jednocześnie zakażenie u matki może być skąpo- lub bezobjawowe. Do grupy TORCH zaliczane są, m.in.: Toxoplasma gondii, wirusy różyczki, cytomegalii (CMV – cytomegalovirus), opryszczki typu 1 i 2 (HSV-1 i HSV-2 – herpes simplex virus 1 i 2), wirus B19, Treponema pallidum. Pewną ochronę płodu zapewniają matczyne przeciwciała (klasy IgG – immunoglobulin G) przechodzące przez łożysko [1, 5, 11, 20, 41, 47, 53]. Zakażenie u ciężarnej można wykryć, m.in., za pomocą badań serologicznych (stosowane różne techniki), genetycznych (np. PCR), poprzez izolację i hodowlę patogenu (może być czasochłonne – szczególnie w przypadku wirusów). Niekiedy w diagnostyce stosuje się inwazyjny zabieg amniopunkcji (amniocentozy). W badaniu ultrasonograficznym (USG – ultrasonografia) – obowiązkowym w wielu krajach, w tym w Polsce – pomimo małej czułości i swoistości metody, można zaobserwować różne zaburzenia w rozwoju płodu, np. wodogłowie (hydrocefalię), małogłowie (mikrocefalię), zwapnienia (np. śródczaszkowe, w wątrobie), powiększenie komór mózgu, malformacje serca, kończyn, IUGR, wodobrzusze, mało- i wielowodzie (niedobór lub nadmiar płynu w worku owodniowym), obrzęk łożyska. Dokładniejsze obrazowanie można uzyskać, m.in., za pomocą technik CT (computed tomography; promieniowanie X jest szkodliwe dla płodu) oraz MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) [1, 2, 10, 11, 13, 20, 33, 46, 47, 54].

Drobnoustroje wykazujące działanie teratogenne
Bakterie

Wśród bakterii chorobotwórczych dla człowieka dwa gatunki – Listeria monocytogenes, Treponema pallidum – stanowią największe zagrożenie dla zdrowia i życia płodu.

Bakterie L. monocytogenes to Gram-dodatnie, względnie beztlenowe, halotolerancyjne (do 10% lub 30% NaCl) mikroorganizmy. Wykazują polimorfizm – mają kształt pałeczek, ziarniakopałeczek lub wydłużony (formy nitkowate). Nie wytwarzają przetrwalników oraz wykazują zdolność do ruchu (w temp. 20–30°C). Mogą namnażać się w szerokim zakresie temperatur (1–45°C, optimum 30–37°C). Są rozpowszechnione w środowisku naturalnym (występują, m.in., w glebie, wodach). Stanowią również mikrobiotę przewodu pokarmowego ssaków (większości), ptaków, zwierząt zmniennocieplnych. Szacuje się, że 1–10% populacji ludzkiej jest nosicielami tych pałeczek. Bakterie te mogą być również wykrywane w żywności (w tym w surowym mleku). L. monocytogenes jest warunkowo chorobotwórczym (oportunistycznym) patogenem ludzi i zwierząt. Jest też fakultatywnym pasożytem wewnątrzkomórkowym (namnaża się w enterocytach, makrofagach, fibroblastach, komórkach śródbłonka naczyń, hepatocytach). Do zakażeń dochodzi najczęściej drogą pokarmową (produkty roślinne i zwierzęce), rzadziej przez kontakt ze zwierzęciem (zakażenia skóry i oczu u lekarzy weterynarii). Okres inkubacji listeriozy trwa zwykle 10–70 dni. Choroba może objawiać się, m.in.: gorączką, biegunką (wodnistą i krwawą), bólami brzucha, mięśni i stawów; może również wystąpić cięższa postać choroby (miąższowe zakażenie mózgu, ZOMR – zapalenie opon mózgowo-rdzeniowych – śmiertelność do 22%, sepsa, zapalenie wsierdzia, szpiku i kości) [2, 11, 13, 15, 21, 47, 51, 53]. Do zakażenia L. monocytogenes może również dojść w czasie porodu lub ciąży (najczęściej w trzecim trymestrze, przez łożysko lub rzadziej drogą wstępującą). Zakażenie w ciąży może, m.in., skutkować przedwczesnym porodem, poronieniem, zapaleniem płuc u płodu, powstawaniem mnogich ropni w wielu narządach (szczególnie w wątrobie i śledzionie) [2, 11, 13, 21, 47, 51, 53].

Krętki (Spirochaetes) są Gram-ujemnymi bakteriami o spiralnym kształcie. Do krętków zaliczane są bakterie z rodzaju Borrelia, Treponema, Leptospira i Brachyspira. Ich komórki są cienkie (0,1–0,3 μm) i długie (do kilkunastu-kilkuset μm). Słabo barwią się metodą Grama. Mogą być wybarwione metodą impregnacji srebrem i obserwowane w mikroskopie z ciemnym polem widzenia. Wykazują zdolność do specyficznego typu ruchu, przypominającego kurczącą się i rozciągającą sprężynę (rola włókna osiowego). Występują w środowisku (głównie wody słodkie i słone), są też komensalami oraz pasożytami zwierząt i ludzi (np. Borellia spp. przenoszone przez kleszcze i wszy). Wykazują wzrost w warunkach tlenowych i beztlenowych oraz w szerokim zakresie temperatur (25–42°C). W przypadku wielu gatunków krętków nie udało się opracować metod ich hodowli in vitro (np. T. pallidum). Szczególnie groźne dla płodu są krętki z rodzaju Treponema [2, 11, 13, 47].

Krętki z tego rodzaju mogą występować jako komensale w jamie ustnej, przewodzie pokarmowym oraz na narządach płciowych ludzi i zwierząt. Ważnym pod względem klinicznym gatunkiem w tym rodzaju jest T. pallidum subsp.pallidum. Bakterie te występują na całym świecie, cechują się dużą wrażliwością na wysychanie, środki dezynfekcyjne i szybko giną poza organizmem człowieka; ponadto powodują ważną pod względem klinicznym chorobę weneryczną (STD – sexually transmitted disease) – kiłę (lues, syphilis). Kiła jest chorobą przewlekłą o zróżnicowanym obrazie klinicznym, w którym wyróżnia się postać wczesną oraz późną (III-rzędową). W postaci wczesnej wyróżnia się kiłę:

I-rzędową (pierwotną) – okres inkubacji 9–90 dni (zwykle 14–21), występują, m.in., bakteriemia, powiększenie węzłów chłonnych (limfadenopatia), zmiany skórne w miejscu wniknięcia patogenu (bezbolesne guzki przechodzące w owrzodzenia, tzw. wrzód twardy), które ulegają wygojeniu (po 2–6 tygodniach),

II-rzędową (wtórną) – występuje zwykle w 9–10. tygodniu choroby, objawy obejmują, m.in., gorączkę, bóle mięśniowe, ból gardła, utratę apetytu, powiększenie węzłów chłonnych, uogólnioną plamisto-grudkową wysypkę (osutkę) na skórze i błonach śluzowych (po dłuższym czasie zanika i choroba przechodzi w stan utajenia).

Kiła III-rzędowa pojawia po kilku lub kilkunastu latach od zakażenia. W tej fazie choroby występują zmiany patologiczne w różnych tkankach i narządach (w tym układu krążenia i nerwowego), będące skutkiem, m.in., przewlekłego stanu zapalnego oraz powstawaniem kilaków (zmian guzkowych o różnej lokalizacji, w tym w narządach wewnętrznych). W kile III-rzędowej może wystąpić, m.in.: zapalenie tętnic, porażenie (paraliż), demencja (otępienie), utrata wzroku [2, 11, 13, 15, 46, 47].

Do zakażenia T. pallidum może dojść również podczas porodu (zakażenie okołoporodowe) lub w czasie ciąży (90% ryzyko zakażenia transplacentarnego). Zakażenie w ciąży może skutkować, m.in., IUGR, obrzękiem płodu, hepatosplenomegalią (powiększeniem wątroby i śledziony), anemią hemolityczną, trombocytopenią (małopłytkowością), uszkodzeniem wielu narządów, zmianami kostnymi, przedwczesnym porodem, poronieniem; w późniejszym okresie u dziecka może wystąpić triada Hutchinsona (zdeformowane siekacze, uszkodzenie słuchu, śródmiąższowe zapalenie rogówki) [2, 13, 46, 47].

Mniej liczne badania wskazują, że negatywny wpływ na ciążę i płód mogą wykazywać również krętki Borrelia burgdorferi (przenoszone przez kleszcze, wywołują borreliozę / chorobę z Lyme). Sugeruje się, że bakterie te są odpowiedzialne m.in. za: powstawanie naczyniaków (nowotworów w obrębie naczyń krwionośnych), PTD, poronienia, utratę wzroku, syndaktylię (zrośnięcie palców), malformacje serca i układu moczowo-płciowego [2, 18, 52].

Pierwotniaki

Pierwotniaki (Protozoa) stanowią sztuczny takson jednokomórkowych organizmów eukariotycznych (domena Eukaryota) zaliczanych do królestwa Protista. Część pierwotniaków jest chorobotwórcza dla zwierząt i człowieka [11, 13].

Należy do nich Toxoplasma gondii, bezwzględnie wewnątrzkomórkowy pasożyt dzikich, hodowlanych i domowych zwierząt stałocieplnych na całym świecie. Pierwotniak ten zaraża również ludzi. Toksoplazmoza stanowi jedną z najczęstszych chorób pasożytniczych i zoonoz u człowieka (zarażenie występuje często w wieku dziecięcym). Seroprewalencja zarażeń jest zróżnicowana w różnych krajach (przeciętnie 30–50%), może sięgać nawet 90% i jest szczególnie wysoka w krajach słabo rozwiniętych. Wyróżniono trzy główne genotypy omawianego pierwotniaka (I–III), z których I wykazuje największą zjadliwość. Cykl rozwojowy T. gondii jest złożony. Żywicielem ostatecznym są koty domowe (Felis catus) i inne kotowate, które po zarażeniu wydalają z kałem oocysty przez okres kilku tygodni (szczególnie dużo w pierwotnym stadium zarażenia). Mniej niż 30% kotów wydala oocysty w kale po spożyciu tachyzoitów lub oocyst, podczas gdy prawie wszystkie wydalają je po spożyciu mięsa zawierającego cysty tkankowe. Oocysty mają kształt okrągły lub owalny i zawierają od kilku do 10 tys. bradyzoitów (niektórzy autorzy stosują określenie sporozoity). Bradyzoity stanowią jedną z form rozwojowych T. gondii, podobną do trofozoitów (tachyzoitów), jednak m.in. wykazują od nich wolniejszy metabolizm, są mniej wrażliwe na sok żołądkowy oraz tworzą w tkankach gospodarza cysty tkankowe. Cysty mogą powstać w mięśniach (szkieletowych i serca), ośrodkowym układzie nerwowym (mózgowiu, rdzeniu kręgowym), siatkówce, płucach, nerkach, wątrobie. Wykrywa się ich zróżnicowaną liczbą w różnych tkankach i narządach w zależności od gatunku żywiciela. Cysty stymulują rozwój trwałej odporności, nie powodują lokalnej reakcji zapalnej ani zaburzeń czynnościowych i pozostają w organizmie przez długi okres (wiele miesięcy, potencjalnie całe życie). Koty zarażają się T. gondii przez połknięcie oocyst lub spożycie mięsa zarażonych żywicieli pośrednich (zawierającego bradyzoity lub tachyzoity), np. gryzoni (w tym myszy), ptaków. W komórkach nabłonkowych jelita oocysty przechodzą w postać trofozoitów, które wykazują zdolność do ruchu i mogą wnikać do komórek na drodze aktywnej penetracji lub poprzez fagocytozę. Trofozoity drogą krwionośną są przenoszone do różnych tkanek i narządów żywiciela (gdzie przechodzą w postać bradyzoitów) lub na drodze rozmnażania płciowego mogą wytwarzać w jelitach nowe oocysty, które są wydalane z kałem [1, 2, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 23, 44, 46, 48, 54].

Człowiek zaraża się tym pierwotniakiem poprzez kontakt z kocimi odchodami, pracując w polu i ogrodzie (w wilgotnej glebie lub piasku oocysty utrzymują żywotność do 18 miesięcy), spożywając nieumyte warzywa i owoce, surowe lub niedogotowane mięso zarażonych zwierząt (często w baraninie, duże zróżnicowanie nosicielstwa u świń < 1%–100%, występuje też w dziczyźnie i drobiu), pijąc surowe mleko (szczególnie kozie, także owcze) lub skażoną wodę. Istnieje możliwość zarażenia poprzez transfuzję krwi. Obróbka cieplna lub głębokie mrożenie niszczą bradyzoity w mięsie. Do zarażenia może dojść w łonie matki, gdyż tachyzoity mogą przenikać przez łożysko. Większość przypadków zarażenia jest bezobjawowa lub skąpoobjawowa i nie wymaga leczenia. Niekiedy u małych dzieci lub osób z obniżoną odpornością (np. chorych na AIDS – acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) występuje powiększenie węzłów chłonnych, splenomegalia (powiększenie śledziony), gorączka, osłabienie, bóle głowy i mięśni, ZOMR, zapalenie siatkówki i naczyniówki, wątroby, mięśnia sercowego, płuc [1, 2, 7, 9, 1113, 15, 17, 23, 44, 46, 48, 54]. T. gondii nie stanowi istotnego zagrożenia dla osób ze sprawnym układem odpornościowym (immunokompetentnych). Jednak jest szczególnie groźny dla płodu przy pierwotnym kontakcie matki z pasożytem (zarażenie w ciąży). Pasożyt ten może powodować u płodu limfadenopatię, hepatosplenomegalię, wodobrzusze, anemię, trombocytopenię, żółtaczkę, wodogłowie, małogłowie, triadę Sabina-Pinkertona (zapalenie naczyniówki i siatkówki – często dotyczy plamki ślepej, zwapnienia śródczaszkowe, poszerzenie układu komorowego mózgu), małoocze (mikroftalmię), zaćmę (kataraktę), zapalenie nerek, kości i okostnej, chrząstek, mózgu i opon mózgowo-rdzeniowych, IUGR, poronienie (rzadziej). Największe ryzyko wad wrodzonych występuje na wczesnych etapach ciąży. Prawdopodobieństwo zarażenia płodu jest wtedy niskie i wzrasta wraz z upływem czasu. W około 90% przypadków zarażeń nie obserwuje się objawów u noworodków. Jednak w późniejszym okresie życia dziecka występują problemy z nauką, upośledzenie umysłowe, mózgowe porażenie dziecięce, padaczka (epilepsja), zez, pogorszenie wzroku (wraz z jego utratą), słuchu. Wprowadzenie leczenia antybiotykowego w ciąży (spiramycyny / rowamycyny) zmniejsza ryzyko wystąpienia wad u płodu [1, 2, 7, 9, 1113, 15, 17, 23, 44, 46, 48, 54].

Wirusy

Wirusy stanowią czynniki zakaźne zaliczane do drobnoustrojów bezwzględnie wewnątrzkomórkowych, tzn. takich, które nie są zdolne do namnażania się poza komórkami makroorganizmu – gospodarza. Zbudowane są z białek oraz kwasów nukleinowych (DNA lub RNA – jedno- lub dwuniciowych). Niekiedy cząsteczka wirusa (wirion) zawiera osłonkę lipidową pochodzącą od zakażonej komórki – fragment błony komórkowej (najczęściej), jądrowej lub siateczki śródplazmatycznej (retikulum endoplazmatycznego). Jak dotąd opracowano niewiele leków skutecznych w zwalczaniu zakażeń wirusowych, m.in., ze względu na mało złożoną budowę oraz brak własnego metabolizmu (niewiele potencjalnych miejsc uchwytu działania leków) [11, 13, 15].

Herpeswirusy

Rodzina Herpesviridae stanowi dużą grupę wirusów chorobotwórczych dla człowieka i zwierząt. Wiriony tych wirusów zawierają dsDNA (double-stranded DNA), wykazują symetrię ikozaedralną (o kształcie dwudziestościanu foremnego) i posiadają osłonkę lipidową. Zakażenia wirusami herpes mają charakter latentny (utajony). Do reaktywacji latentnych wirusów może dojść na skutek stresu, ekspozycji na promieniowanie słoneczne, spadku odporności. Przypuszczalnie stan nosicielstwa trwa przez całe życie. Mogą wykazywać działanie kancerogenne – np. HHV-8 (wirus mięsaka Kaposiego; human herpes virus 8). Wirusy cytomegalii (CMV), opryszczki pospolitej (HSV-1 i HSV-2), ospy wietrznej i półpaśca (VZV – varicella- zoster virus) mogą powodować wady wrodzone u płodu [11, 13, 15].

CMV (HHV-5) jest rozpowszechnionym na świecie herpeswirusem ludzi i zwierząt. Przenoszony jest przez różne wydzieliny organizmu (np. ślinę, mocz, nasienie, wydzielinę szyjki macicy, mleko kobiece), krew. Do zakażenia pierwotnego wirusem (zwykle bezobjawowe) najczęściej dochodzi w młodym wieku (< 3 r.ż.). Wirus wnika do komórek tkanki nabłonkowej, a następnie przedostaje się do krwi i zakaża monocyty. CMV wykazuje tropizm do wielu typów tkanek (np. nabłonkowej, krwiotwórczej) i komórek (np. monocytów i makrofagów, neutrofili, komórek śródbłonka naczyń, fibroblastów, neuronów, miocytów tkanki mięśniowej gładkiej, hepatocytów). Powoduje efekt cytopatyczny (CPE – cytopathic effect) w postaci zmiany morfologii komórki (zwiększenie rozmiarów) oraz powstawania ciałek wtrętowych (inkluzyjnych) w cytoplazmie i jądrze (CID – cytomegalic inlusion disease). Wtórne zakażenie często występuje u młodzieży i objawia się gorączką, powiększeniem węzłów chłonnych, splenomegalią, zaburzeniami czynności wątroby (rzadko występuje żółtaczka). Ponadto we krwi można zaobserwować atypowe limfocyty. Po przechorowaniu wirus pozostaje utajony w komórkach macierzystych szpiku kostnego CD34+ (cluster of differentiation 34), monocytach i komórkach dendrytycznych. Kolejna reaktywacja latentnego wirusa zazwyczaj jest bezobjawowa. Skuteczność w leczeniu zakażeń CMV wykazują gancyklowir i walgancyklowir [1, 2, 5, 11, 13, 17, 38, 41, 45, 46].

CMV może wywoływać zakażenia okołoporodowe (rzadziej) lub wewnątrzmaciczne (częściej). Przy pierwotnym zakażeniu u matki ryzyko przeniesienia wirusa na płód szacuje się na 40%, przy wtórnej – 0,5–1,5%. Zakażenie może skutkować: obrzękiem płodu, wodobrzuszem, poronieniem, mikrocefalią, uszkodzeniem mózgu (w tym powiększeniem komór mózgu i pojawieniem się zwapnień okołokomorowych), hepatosplenomegalią, powstawaniem zwapnień w wątrobie, zapalaniem naczyniówki i siatkówki oka, SNHL (zwykle obustronne, uszkodzenie narządu Cortiego oraz nerwu przedsionkowo-ślimakowego), IUGR, powstawaniem wybroczyn skórnych, trombocytopenią [1, 2, 5, 10, 1113, 17, 38, 41, 45, 46].

Wirus opryszczki pospolitej występuje na całym świecie i jest rozpowszechniony w populacji ludzkiej. Przenoszony jest przez kontakt bezpośredni, wydzieliny ustrojowe i przedmioty zanieczyszczone tymi wydzielinami, drogą wziewną (kropelkową), krew. Wyróżnia się dwa gatunki tego wirusa:

HSV-1 (HHV-1) – wywołuje głównie opryszczkę wargową – zmiany pęcherzykowate na skórze, wypełnione treścią surowiczą (niekiedy też zmiany na błonach śluzowych jamy ustnej). Rzadziej zakażenie dotyczy spojówki lub rogówki (może prowadzić do ślepoty). Pierwotne zakażenie głównie w wieku dziecięcym (zwykle bezobjawowe),

HSV-2 (HHV-2) – wywołuje głównie opryszczkę narządów płciowych – objawiającą się w postaci zmian pęcherzykowatych. Pierwotne zakażenie o cięższym przebiegu niż wtórne. Zakażenie tym wirusem stanowi jedną z najczęstszych chorób wenerycznych [1, 2, 5, 11, 13, 41, 46].

Po pierwotnym zakażeniu wirusy opryszczki pozostają latentne w zwojach korzenia tylnego nerwu trójdzielnego (V nerw czaszkowy) i/lub w zwojach korzeni tylnych (grzbietowych) nerwów lędźwiowo-krzyżowych, powodując w późniejszym okresie nawracające zakażenia. HSV-1 i HSV-2 mogą również wywoływać zakażenie układu nerwowego, powodując ZOMR (HSV-2, przebieg zazwyczaj łagodny), zapalenie mózgu (HSV-1, zazwyczaj obejmuje płat skroniowy, cięższy przebieg), jak również zakażać płód. Jednak częściej dochodzi do zakażeń okołoporodowych (80–90% przypadków, mogą mieć ciężki przebieg) niż transplacentarnych. Przy pierwotnym zakażeniu u matki ryzyko przeniesienia wirusa na płód szacuje się na 50% (tylko 0–3% przy zakażeniach nawracających). Zakażenie płodu może skutkować poronieniem, IUGR, skróceniem czasu trwania ciąży, uszkodzeniem słuchu (rzadko) [1, 2, 5, 11, 13, 41, 46]. Nieliczne badania wskazują na możliwość wystąpienia następujących powikłań jak: mikrocefalia, zwapnienia śródczaszkowe, zapalenie naczyniówki i siatkówki, małoocze [2, 46].

Wirus ospy wietrznej i półpaśca (VZV / HHV-3) jest patogenem występującym na całym świecie. Wyróżnia się co najmniej siedem genotypów tego wirusa, nie różniących się wyraźnie antygenowo. Ospa wietrzna jest chorobą przenoszoną drogą kropelkową i przez kontakt bezpośredni. Występuje najczęściej w okresie zimy i wczesnej wiosny. Przypadki ospy rzadziej wykrywa się w regionach klimatu tropikalnego, prawdopodobnie ze względu na nietrwałość wirusa w podwyższonych temperaturach. Choroba dotyczy głównie dzieci i objawia się lekką gorączką, pęcherzykowatymi zmianami na skórze i błonach śluzowych. Cięższy przebieg choroby stwierdza się, gdy dojdzie do pierwotnego zakażenia u osoby dorosłej. Może wystąpić wtedy wysoka gorączka, zapalenie wątroby, mózgu. Wirus początkowo replikuje sie w komórkach nabłonkowych nosogardzieli lub spojówki oka, następnie dostaje się do okolicznych węzłów chłonnych. Po około dwóch tygodniach od zakażenia dochodzi do wiremii (obecności wirusa we krwi) i patogen zakaża komórki skóry, wywołując wysypkę (początkowo plamistą, a następnie grudkową z towarzyszącym świądem). Po przechorowaniu ospy wietrznej pozostaje trwała odporność, jednak wirus pozostaje latentny w neuronach zwojów czuciowych rdzenia kręgowego lub w komórkach nerwów czaszkowych. Wirus ten może później ulec reaktywacji, powodując półpasiec (częstość występowania niezależna od pory roku). Choroba ta objawia się wysypką na skórze (zwykle na tułowiu, rzadziej w innym miejscach), neuralgią. Nerwoból może utrzymywać się przez dłuższy czas, nawet kilka lat. W rzadszych przypadkach może wystąpić postać oczna półpaśca [1, 2, 5, 11, 13, 33, 41, 46].

W przypadku pierwotnego zakażenia u kobiety w ciąży może dojść do przeniesienia wirusa ospy wietrznej na płód, co może skutkować (w rzadkich przypadkach) porodem przedwczesnym, poronieniem, wadami wrodzonymi lub śmiercią dziecka. Wśród wad wrodzonych (CVS) notuje się: bliznowate zmiany na skórze (70% przypadków), małogłowie, uszkodzenie mózgu (w tym kory mózgowej), wodogłowie, zapalenie naczyniówki i siatkówki oka, małoocze, zaćmę, oczopląs, hipoplazję (niecałkowite wykształcenie) kończyn i mięśni, IUGR, SNHL, wodobrzusze, malformacje serca, uszu lub układu pokarmowego (rzadziej), zwapnienia tkanek miękkich. Prawdopodobnie występuje większe ryzyko śmierci płodu, jeśli jest płci męskiej (65–85% urodzonych dzieci z CVS jest płci żeńskiej; CVS – congenital varicella syndrome). Dostępna jest szczepionka chroniąca przed zakażeniem opisywanym wirusem. W przypadku pierwotnego zakażenia w ciąży terapia surowicą odpornościową (zawierającą przeciwciała anty-VZV) lub stosowanie leków przeciwwirusowych (acyklowiru, walacyklowiru) prawdopodobnie mogą zmniejszyć ryzyko zakażenia płodu [1, 2, 5, 10, 11, 13, 33, 41, 46, 53].

Nieliczne wyniki badań wskazują, że ujemny wpływ na ciążę i płód może wywierać także wirus Epsteina-Barr (EBV – Epstein-Barr virus / HHV-4). Do zakażenia nim dochodzi przez kontakt bezpośredni, a zakażenia są powszechne (ponad 90% populacji). Zakażenie EBV we wczesnym okresie życia jest bezobjawowe, natomiast w okresie młodzieńczym może przybierać postać mononukleozy zakaźnej (choroby Pfeiffera) z gorączką, bólem gardła, powiększeniem węzłów chłonnych (głównie szyjnych), śledziony, wątroby (rzadziej). Wirus ten wykazuje właściwości kancerogenne (chłoniak Burkitta, Hodgkina, inne chłoniaki, rak nosogardzieli) oraz tropizm głównie względem limfocytów B. Wyróżnia się dwa genotypy wirusa Epsteina-Barr: 1 (dominuje na świecie), 2 (występuje endemicznie w Afryce i Papui-Nowej Gwinei) [2, 11, 13]. Sugeruje się, że ten herpeswirus może powodować, m.in., PTD, poronienia, wady serca, zaćmę [2, 8, 49].

Inne wirusy

Wirus B19 (parwowirus B19) jest małym, rozpowszechnionym na świecie wirusem ssDNA (single-stranded DNA), klasyfikowanym do rodziny Parvoviridae. Wirion tego patogenu wykazuje symetrię ikozaedralną i nie posiada otoczki. Wyróżnia się trzy warianty genotypowe tego wirusa:

– najczęściej wywołujący zakażenia,

– sporadycznie wywołujący zakażenia (występuje głównie w Europie i Ameryce Północnej),

– najrzadziej wywołujący zakażenia, wykryty w Afryce (ale występuje również na innych kontynentach) [1, 2, 11, 22, 46].

Wirus B19 replikuje się wyłącznie w szybko dzielących się komórkach i wykazuje powinowactwo do antygenu P układu grupowego krwi. Zakaża erytrocyty (RBC – red blood cell), erytroblasty (komórki prekursorowe erytrocytów w szpiku kostnym), megakarioblasty i megakariocyty (komórki prekursorowe trombocytów) oraz komórki mięśnia sercowego, śródbłonka, wątroby, płuc, nerek. Wirus ten przenosi się głównie drogą kropelkową i do zakażenia dochodzi najczęściej u dzieci, często późną zimą i wczesną wiosną. Zakażenie w wieku dziecięcym nazywane jest chorobą piątą, rumieniem zakaźnym, zespołem spoliczkowanego dziecka. Objawy choroby u dzieci obejmują wysypkę na policzkach (też na tułowiu i kończynach) i objawy grypopodobne. U dorosłych zakażenie może mieć postać bezobjawową lub mogą wystąpić objawy grypopodobne i symetryczne zapalenie wielu stawów (np. śródręcza, kolanowego, nadgarstkowego, łokciowego, międzypaliczkowych). Ze względu na powinowactwo wirusa B19 do erytrocytów, zakażenia z jego udziałem są szczególnie groźne dla osób chorujących na różne postacie niedokrwistości (anemii). Pacjenci nie chorujący na anemię oraz ze sprawnym układem immunologicznym zwykle nie wymagają leczenia. Przechorowanie zakażenia pozostawia odporność na całe życie [1, 2, 11, 22, 43, 46].

Parwowirus B19 może być przenoszony przez bezpośredni kontakt z wydzielinami dróg oddechowych chorego, przez krew i preparaty krwiopochodne (na drodze transfuzji), jak również przez łożysko. Przy pierwotnym zakażeniu u matki ryzyko transmisji wirusa na płód szacuje się na 30–60% (I trymestr – 14%, II – 50%, III > 60%). Zakażenie może prowadzić do poronienia, obrzęku płodu (można zaobserwować w badaniu USG), rzadziej do zapalenia mięśnia sercowego i wad wrodzonych. Wirus B19 wykazuje słabe działanie teratogenne, jednak może powodować wady ośrodkowego układu nerwowego (OUN), twarzoczaszki oraz narządu wzroku (małoocze, niewykształcenie tęczówki i soczewki oka, uszkodzenie rogówki). Przyczyny poronienia w zakażeniu wirusem B19 są słabo poznane. Prawdopodobnie związane są z wielonarządowym uszkodzeniem płodu. Największe ryzyko utraty ciąży występuje w pierwszej połowie ciąży. W przypadku stwierdzenia obrzęku płodu, dopłodowa transfuzja krwi znacząco zmniejsza ryzyko śmierci dziecka [1, 2, 11, 22, 43, 46].

Wirus różyczki jest rozpowszechnionym na świecie wirusem ssRNA (single-stranded RNA) o ikozaedralnej budowie kapsydu, należącym do rodziny Togaviridae. RNA tego wirusa jest o dodatniej polarności – może pełnić funkcję mRNA. Na skutek replikacji wirusa dochodzi w komórkach do zahamowania mitozy (na skutek uszkodzenia cytoszkieletu) i apoptozy komórek. Do zakażenia tym patogenem dochodzi drogą kropelkową i wertykalną. Większość zakażeń występuje w wieku dziecięcym. U dzieci przebieg różyczki jest łagodny, a objawy są mało specyficzne. Pojawia się wysypka (rozpoczynająca się od twarzy i obejmująca następie kończyny i tułów), powiększenie węzłów chłonnych, gorączka. U dorosłych zakażenie może być bezobjawowe, jak również może wystąpić zmniejszenie apetytu, nudności, ból stawów (spowodowany stanem zapalnym), nieznaczna gorączka, zapalenie spojówek, ból gardła, powiększenie węzłów chłonnych. Przechorowanie zakażenia pozostawia odporność na całe życie. W przypadku różyczki wrodzonej (CRS – congenital rubella syndrome, zespół Gregga) może dojść do poronienia (rzadziej), IUGR, mikrocefalii, uszkodzenia OUN, wątroby, nerek, słuchu (obustronne SNHL spowodowane uszkodzeniem ślimaka i narządu Cortiego, może wystąpić w późniejszym okresie życia dziecka), wad serca, oczu (np. zaćma, jaskra, retinopatia barwnikowa), hepatosplenomegalii, stenozy (zwężenia) naczyń płucnych. Patogeneza wad wrodzonych jest słabo poznana. Najgroźniejsze są zakażenia płodu w pierwszym trymestrze ciąży; w późniejszym okresie ryzyko wad u płodu znacznie maleje. Dostępna jest szczepionka chroniąca przed wirusem różyczki w postaci skojarzonej (MMR – measles, mumps, rubella). Z uwagi na to, że szczepionka ta zawiera atenuowane patogeny, przeciwwskazane jest stosowanie jej w ciąży oraz w okresie przed zajściem w ciążę [1, 2, 5, 10, 11, 13, 17, 27, 41, 46, 53].

Wirus Zika (ZIKV) został odkryty w 1947 r. u makaków w Afryce. Wirion tego flawiwirusa zawiera ssRNA (o dodatniej polarności), wykazuje symetrię ikozaedralną i posiada otoczkę. ZIKV przenoszony jest głównie przez komary (szczególnie Aedes aegypti, A. albopictus), dlatego też zaliczany jest do arbowirusów. Komary mogą przenosić ZIKV od zakażonych zwierząt, także od ludzi. Inne potwierdzone drogi transmisji to kontakt płciowy i pogryzienie przez zwierzę. Zakażenia ZIKV stwierdzano na całym świecie. Endemicznie wirus ten występuje w Afryce, Azji, Ameryce Południowej i Środkowej. Wirus Zika u dorosłych osób wywołuje zwykle łagodną, krótko trwające zakażenie z mało specyficznymi objawami. Obserwuje się swędzącą wysypkę (plamistą lub plamisto-grudkową), niewielką gorączkę, zapalenie stawów (z obrzękiem), bóle mięśni, głowy, limfadenopatię, zapalenie spojówek, nudności, osłabienie. Rzadkim powikłaniem przypisywanym zakażeniu ZIKV u dorosłych pacjentów jest zespół Guillaina-Barrégo (GBS – Guillain-Barré syndrome) z ostrym diemielinizacyjnym stanem zapalnym w OUN. Opisywany wirus przedostaje się do płynów ustrojowych – do śliny, moczu, nasienia, mleka. Diagnostyka serologiczna zakażenia jest utrudniona, ze względu na podobieństwo antygenowe ZIKV z innymi flawiwirusami. W diagnostyce jako „złoty standard” wykorzystywana jest technika PCR. Wyróżnia się dwie główne linie ewolucyjne ZIKV: afrykańską, azjatycką (wywołuje też zakażenia w Ameryce Południowej). Zapobieganie zakażeniu obejmuje stosowanie repelentów na komary i kontrolę populacji komarów w środowisku. Opublikowane w ostatnich latach prace naukowe wskazują, że wirus Zika wykazuje neurotropizm, może przenikać przez łożysko (także namnażać w jego komórkach) i powodować różne wady wrodzone u dziecka (CZS – congenital Zika syndrome). Najczęściej powodowane zaburzenia to: mikrocefalia (małogłowie), mikroencefalia (małomózgowie), powiększenie komór mózgu, zwapnienia w tkance mózgowej (w ośrodkach korowych i podkorowych), bezzakrętowość mózgu, hipoplazję móżdżku. Obszarami mózgu najsilniej objętymi procesem chorobowym są kora mózgowa, wzgórze i podwzgórze. Inne powikłania zakażenia w ciąży to: poronienie, uszkodzenie wzroku (uszkodzenie siatkówki, naczyniówki, tęczówki, soczewki, nerwu wzrokowego, zaćma), słuchu, IUGR, wodogłowie wewnętrzne, uszkodzenie rdzenia kręgowego [3, 16, 20, 24, 25, 28, 32, 35, 37, 40, 425658].

Nieliczne publikacje naukowe wskazują, że negatywny wpływ na ciążę i płód mogą wykazywać również następujące patogeny:

wirus odry (Paramyxoviridae) – wirus ssRNA (o ujemnej polarności), przenoszony drogą kropelkową oraz przez bezpośredni kontakt. Wywołuje efekt cytopatyczny (CPE) w postaci syncytiów (wielojądrowych komórek powstałych przez fuzję komórek jednojądrzastych). Odra objawia się wysypką, limfopenią (spadkiem liczby limfocytów we krwi), kaszlem, kichaniem, nieżytem nosa, gorączką. Powikłaniem odry może być zapalenie krtani, oskrzeli, płuc, ucha środkowego, mózgu i OMR. Obecnie zachorowania są rzadkie, ze względu na wprowadzenie obowiązkowych szczepień ochronnych [2, 11, 13]. Przypuszczalnie zakażenie wirusem odry może skutkować PTD, poronieniem, IUGR [2, 30].

wirusy grypy (Orthomyxoviridae) – wirusy ssRNA (o ujemnej polarności). Wyróżnia się trzy główne typy tych wirusów: A (zakaża człowieka, ptaki, świnie), B i C (zakażają ludzi). Typ D powoduje zakażenia u bydła. RNA typów A i B podzielone jest na osiem segmentów, pozostałych na siedem. W typie A ponadto wyróżnia się podtypy w oparciu o hemaglutyninę i neuraminidazę (np. H1N1). Wirusy grypy przenoszą się drogą kropelkową, przez bezpośredni kontakt oraz przez przedmioty. Najwięcej zachorowań obserwuje się w okresie jesieni i zimy. Dostępna jest szczepionka, chroniąca przed grypą. Wirusy grypy cechują się dużą zmiennością antygenową [2, 11, 13]. Sugeruje się, że mogą powodować PTD, poronienia, IUGR [2, 6, 36].

Mikotoksyny

Mikotoksyny to grupa substancji o różnorodnej budowie chemicznej, względnie małej masie cząsteczkowej, wykazujące małą wrażliwość na podwyższoną temperaturę (są termostabilne). Stanowią metabolity grzybów należących do rodzajów Aspergillus (kropidlak), Penicillium (pędzlak), Fusarium, Alternaria, Byssochlamys, Stachybotrys. Jeden gatunek grzyba może wytwarzać więcej niż jeden typ mikotoksyn. Największy wpływ na wytwarzanie mikotoksyn przez grzyby mają: wilgotność (stymuluje wilgotność względna powietrza > 70% oraz zawartość wilgoci w produkcie roślinnym > 15%), temperatura oraz obecność mikrobioty towarzyszącej (działanie hamujące). Niskie temperatury spowalniają wzrost pleśni, ale nie hamują wytwarzania toksyn. Wykazano, że szczególnie w przypadku grzybów z rodzaju Fusarium, niska temperatura wzmaga wytwarzanie mikotoksyn. Opisywane substancje wykazują względem ludzi i zwierząt działanie toksyczne (w tym cyto-, hepato-, nefro- i neurotoksyczne), mutagenne, kancerogenne (powodują m.in. HCC – hepatocellular carcinoma), teratogenne, alergenne; zaburzają również funkcjonowanie układu odpornościowego i hormonalnego (np. zearalenon – działanie estrogenne). Według FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization) około 25% produktów rolniczych (np. nasiona, orzechy, owoce, warzywa) na świecie może być zanieczyszczone tymi toksynami. Mikotoksyny mogą występować w produktach pochodzenia zwierzęcego (mleko i jego przetwory, mięso, jaja), jeśli zwierzęta hodowlane były karmione zanieczyszczoną paszą [4, 11, 21, 23, 29, 31, 34, 39]. Mikotoksyny dostają się do organizmu głównie drogą pokarmową. Mniejsze znaczenie ma wnikanie przez skórę oraz drogi oddechowe. Najważniejsze pod względem toksykologicznym są: aflatoksyny, ochratoksyna A, patulina, sterygmatocystyna, fumonizyny, trichoteceny. Zatrucie mikotoksynami nazywane jest mikotoksykozą i może przybierać postać ostrą lub przewlekłą. Jednak zatrucia ostre w krajach rozwiniętych oraz klimatu umiarkowanego występują rzadko i częściej dotyczą zwierząt hodowlanych. Bardziej wrażliwe na szkodliwe działanie mikotoksyn są dzieci. Mechanizm działania toksycznego jest zróżnicowany, np. dochodzi do zablokowania syntezy białek lub replikacji DNA w komórce, mutacji w genomie. Działanie mutagenne i rakotwórcze (potwierdzone lub prawdopodobne) wykazują aflatoksyny, ochratoksyna A, fumonizyny, sterygmatocystyna. W przypadku patuliny dostępne są rozbieżne dane o właściwościach rakotwórczych. Narządem najbardziej podatnym na kancerogenezę jest wątroba z uwagi na istotną rolę tego narządu w metabolizmie ksenobiotyków. W przypadku aflatoksyn, ochratoksyny A, patuliny dostępne są dane o szkodliwości tych substancji dla płodu. W stosunku do mikotoksyn brak jest swoistych odtrutek, toteż w zatruciach stosowane jest leczenie objawowe. Działania zapobiegające zatruciom powinny obejmować: stosowanie fungicydów, właściwe magazynowanie produktów spożywczych (np. właściwa temperatura, wilgotność, czystość mikrobiologiczna powietrza), badanie żywności pod względem obecności grzybów mikroskopowych i ich toksyn. Mikotoksyny w produktach spożywczych można wykryć za pomocą metod chromatograficznych (np. HPLC – high-performance liquid chromatography, chromatografia gazowa, TLC – thin-layer chromatography), detekcji fluorescencji w świetle UV (ultraviolet) [4, 11, 21, 23, 29, 31, 34, 39].

Opis wybranych mikotoksyn

Aflatoksyny stanowią pierwszą odkrytą i najlepiej poznaną grupę mikotoksyn. Są wytwarzane przez grzyby Aspergillus parasiticus, A. flavus, A. nomius, A. niger, A. bombycis, A. ochraceoroseus. Cechują się małą wrażliwością na podwyższoną temperaturę. Główne odmiany aflatoksyn to: B1 i B2 (wykazują niebieską fluorescencję w UV), G1 i G2 (zielona fluorescencja w UV), M1 i M2 (hydroksylowane metabolity B1 i B2 przechodzące do mleka zwierząt). Aflatoksyny wykazują działanie hepatotoksyczne, mutagenne, kancerogenne (powodują m.in. nowotwory wątroby), teratogenne. Przedstawiane toksyny wykrywane są w orzechach (w tym ziemnych / arachidowych), kukurydzy, soi, suszonych owocach, ziarnach kawy, mleku, serach, maśle, mięsie, jajach [4, 11, 21, 23, 29, 31, 34, 39].

Ochratoksyna A (OTA – ochratoxin A) jest termostabilną mikotoksyną o budowie peptydowej, wytwarzaną głównie przez pleśnie Penicillium verrucosum (klimat umiarkowany i chłodny) oraz Aspergillus ochraceus (klimat ciepły i tropikalny). OTA wykazuje najsilniejsze działanie w grupie ochratoksyn. Inne gatunki wytwarzające tę toksynę to: P. viridicatum, P. palitans, P. cyclopium, P. nordicum, A. carbonarius, A. niger. Ochratoksyna A wykazuje działanie nefrotoksyczne, hepatotoksyczne, mutagenne, kancerogenne (powodując np. nowotwory nerek) oraz teratogenne. Zaburza również funkcjonowanie układu odpornościowego. Występuje głównie w zbożach (jęczmień, kukurydza, pszenica, ryż) i ich przetworach; także w chlebie, orzechach (np. pekan, arachidowych, brazylijskich), ziarnach kawy, przyprawach, suszonych owocach, winie, piwie, mięsie (np. wieprzowinie, drobiu), rybach [4, 29, 31, 34, 39].

Patulina jest termostabilną mikotoksyną (o budowie dwupierścieniowego laktonu) wytwarzaną m.in. przez grzyby Penicillium expansum, P. patulum, P. cyclopium, Aspergillus clavatus, Byssochlamys fulva. Spożyta patulina powoduje uszkodzenie wątroby, owrzodzenia przewodu pokarmowego. Negatywne również oddziałuje na płód. Dostępne są rozbieżne dane na temat właściwości kancerogennych tej toksyny. Patulina występuje głównie w jabłkach oraz ich przetworach (np. soki), rzadziej w innych owocach i warzywach (gruszki, winogrona, morele, banany, pomidory). W procesie fermentacji surowca roślinnego ulega częściowo degradacji [21, 31, 39].

Podsumowanie

Negatywny wpływ na prawidłowy przebieg ciąży może wywierać wiele czynników. Poza czynnikami genetycznymi istotną grupę stanowią choroby zakaźne i pasożytnicze (szczególnie w krajach słabo rozwiniętych). Wśród licznych drobnoustrojów o właściwościach teratogennych wyróżnia się te zaliczane tradycyjnie do grupy TORCH, jak i nowe, o rosnącym znaczeniu (ZIKV). Grupa TORCH obejmuje różne drobnoustroje, zarówno bakterie, wirusy, jak i pierwotniaki. Mniej uwagi poświęca się zagrożeniom związanym z mikotoksynami. Ich negatywny wpływ na prawidłowy rozwój płodu jest niewystarczająco zbadany. Poronieniom oraz wadom wrodzonym płodu o podłożu mikrobiologicznym można zapobiegać poprzez wykonywanie przesiewowych badań serologicznych, badań mikrobiologicznych (kolonizacji dróg rodnych), analizę żywności pod względem obecności mikotoksyn i grzybów, stosowanie szczepień ochronnych (w przypadku różyczki i ospy wietrznej) oraz edukację społeczeństwa odnośnie potencjalnych zagrożeń i profilaktyki. Znaczenie działań profilaktycznych podkreśla fakt, że zakażenia lub zarażenia patogenami oraz zatrucia mikotoksynami u matki mogą mieć często charakter skąpo- lub bezobjawowy. W diagnostyce różnych stanów patologicznych rozwoju płodu, pomimo małej specyficzności, pomocna jest technika USG. Jednak nie wszystkie zaburzenia rozwojowe u płodu można zaobserwować za pomocą tego badania (np. uszkodzenie słuchu).

Boyer S.G., Boyer K.M.: Update on TORCH infections in the newborn infant. Newborn Infant Nursing Rev. 4, 70–80 (2004)BoyerS.G.BoyerK.M.Update on TORCH infections in the newborn infantNewborn Infant Nursing Rev.47080200410.1053/j.nainr.2004.01.001Search in Google Scholar

Bręborowicz G.H. (ed.): Położnictwo i ginekologia. Tom I. Wydaw nictwo Lekarskie PZWL, Warszawa, 2015BręborowiczG.H.(ed.):Położnictwo i ginekologiaTomIWydaw nictwo Lekarskie PZWLWarszawa2015Search in Google Scholar

Chan J.F.W., Choi G.K.Y., Yip C.C.Y., Cheng V.C.C., Yuen K.-Y.: Zika fever and congenital Zika syndrome: an unexpected emerging arboviral disease. J. Infection, 72, 507–524 (2016)ChanJ.F.W.ChoiG.K.Y.YipC.C.Y.ChengV.C.C.YuenK.-Y.Zika fever and congenital Zika syndrome: an unexpected emerging arboviral diseaseJ. Infection72507524201610.1016/j.jinf.2016.02.011711260326940504Search in Google Scholar

Chhonker S.K., Rawat D., Naik R.A., Koiri R.K.: An overview of mycotoxins in human health with emphasis on development and progression of liver cancer. Clin. Oncol. 3, 1–4 (2018)ChhonkerS.K.RawatD.NaikR.A.KoiriR.K.An overview of mycotoxins in human health with emphasis on development and progression of liver cancerClin. Oncol.3142018Search in Google Scholar

Cohen B.E., Durstenfeld A., Roehm P.C.: Viral causes of hearing loss: a review for hearing health professionals. Trends Hear. 18, 1–17 (2014)CohenB.E.DurstenfeldA.RoehmP.C.Viral causes of hearing loss: a review for hearing health professionalsTrends Hear.18117201410.1177/2331216514541361422218425080364Search in Google Scholar

Dorélien A.: The effects of in utero exposure to influenza on birth and infant outcomes in the US. Popul. Dev. Rev. 45, 489–523 (2019)DorélienA.The effects of in utero exposure to influenza on birth and infant outcomes in the USPopul. Dev. Rev.45489523201910.1111/padr.12232676706631582859Search in Google Scholar

Dubey J.P., Lindsay D.S., Speer C.A.: Structures of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, bradyzoites, and sporozoites and biology and development of tissue cysts. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 11, 267–299 (1998)DubeyJ.P.LindsayD.S.SpeerC.A.Structures of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, bradyzoites, and sporozoites and biology and development of tissue cystsClin. Microbiol. Rev.11267299199810.1128/CMR.11.2.2671068339564564Search in Google Scholar

Eskild A., Bruu A.-L., Stray-Pedersen B., Jenum P.: Epstein-Barr virus infection during pregnancy and the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. Int. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 112, 1620–1624 (2005)EskildA.BruuA.-L.Stray-PedersenB.JenumP.Epstein-Barr virus infection during pregnancy and the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomeInt. J. Obstet. Gynecol.11216201624200510.1111/j.1471-0528.2005.00764.x16305564Search in Google Scholar

Flegr J., Prandota J., Sovickova M., Israili Z.H.: Toxoplasmosis – a global threat. Correlation of latent toxoplasmosis with specific disease burden in a set of 88 countries. Plos One. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090203 (2014)FlegrJ.PrandotaJ.SovickovaM.IsrailiZ.H.Toxoplasmosis – a global threat. Correlation of latent toxoplasmosis with specific disease burden in a set of 88 countriesPlos One.DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.00902032014396385124662942Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Hanzlik E., Gigante J.: Microcephaly. Children, 4, 1–8 (2017)HanzlikE.GiganteJ.MicrocephalyChildren418201710.3390/children4060047548362228598357Search in Google Scholar

Heczko P.B. (ed.), Wróblewska M. (ed.), Pietrzyk A. (ed.): Mikrobiologia lekarska. Wydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWL, Warszawa, 2015HeczkoP.B.(ed.)WróblewskaM.(ed.)PietrzykA.(ed.):Mikrobiologia lekarskaWydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWLWarszawa2015Search in Google Scholar

Heerema-McKenney A.: Defense and infection of the human placenta. APMIS, 126, 570–588 (2018)Heerema-McKenneyA.Defense and infection of the human placentaAPMIS126570588201810.1111/apm.1284730129129Search in Google Scholar

Irving W., Boswell T., Ala’Aldeen D.: Mikrobiologia medyczna: Krótkie wykłady. Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN, Warszawa, 2012IrvingW.BoswellT.Ala’AldeenD.Mikrobiologia medyczna: Krótkie wykładyWydawnictwo Naukowe PWNWarszawa2012Search in Google Scholar

Karagiozova D.: Teratogenic agents and related conditions. Texila Int. J. Med. 5, 1–12 (2017)KaragiozovaD.Teratogenic agents and related conditionsTexila Int. J. Med.5112201710.21522/TIJMD.2013.05.02.Art001Search in Google Scholar

Kayser F.H., Bienz K.A., Eckert J., Zinkernagel R.M., Heczko P.B. (ed.), Pietrzyk A. (ed.): Mikrobiologia Lekarska. Wydawnictwo lekarskie PZWL, Warszawa, 2007KayserF.H.BienzK.A.EckertJ.ZinkernagelR.M.HeczkoP.B.(ed.)PietrzykA.(ed.):Mikrobiologia LekarskaWydawnictwo lekarskie PZWLWarszawa2007Search in Google Scholar

Klase Z.A., Khakhina S., Schneider A.B., Callahan M.V., Glasspool-Malone J., Malone R.: Zika fetal neuropathogenesis: etiology of a viral syndrome. Plos Negl. Trop. Dis. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004877 (2016)KlaseZ.A.KhakhinaS.SchneiderA.B.CallahanM.V.Glasspool-MaloneJ.MaloneR.Zika fetal neuropathogenesis: etiology of a viral syndromePlos Negl. Trop. Dis.DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.00048772016499927427560129Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Korver A.M.H., Smith R.J.H., Camp G.V., Schleiss M.R., Bitner-Glindzicz M.S.K., Lustig L.R., Usami S.-I., Boudewyns A.N.: Congenital hearing loss. Nat. Rev. Dis. Primers. DOI: 10.1038/nrdp.2016.94 (2018)KorverA.M.H.SmithR.J.H.CampG.V.SchleissM.R.Bitner-GlindziczM.S.K.LustigL.R.UsamiS.-I.BoudewynsA.N.Congenital hearing lossNat. Rev. Dis. Primers.DOI:10.1038/nrdp.2016.942018567503128079113Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Lakos A., Solymosi N.: Maternal Lyme borreliosis and pregnancy outcome. Int. J. Infect. Dis. 14, 494–498 (2010)LakosA.SolymosiN.Maternal Lyme borreliosis and pregnancy outcomeInt. J. Infect. Dis.14494498201010.1016/j.ijid.2009.07.01919926325Search in Google Scholar

Larsen B., Hwang J.: Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma, and adverse pregnancy outcomes: a fresh look. Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol. DOI: 10.1155/2010/521921 (2010)LarsenB.HwangJ.Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma, and adverse pregnancy outcomes: a fresh lookInfect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol.DOI:10.1155/2010/5219212010291366420706675Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Levine D., Jani J.C., Castro-Aragon I., Cannie M.: How does imaging of congenital Zika compare with imaging of other TORCH infections? Radiology, 285, 744–761 (2017)LevineD.JaniJ.C.Castro-AragonI.CannieM.How does imaging of congenital Zika compare with imaging of other TORCH infections?Radiology285744761201710.1148/radiol.201717123829155634Search in Google Scholar

Libudzisz Z. (ed.), Kowal K. (ed.), Żakowska Z. (ed.): Mikrobiologia techniczna tom 2. Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN, Warszawa, 2008LibudziszZ.(ed.)KowalK.(ed.)ŻakowskaZ.(ed.):Mikrobiologia techniczna tom 2Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWNWarszawa2008Search in Google Scholar

Markowska A., Połczyńska-Kaniak E.: Zakażenie parwowirusem B19 w czasie ciąży. Ginekologia po dyplomie, lipiec, 31–37 (2011)MarkowskaA.Połczyńska-KaniakE.Zakażenie parwowirusem B19 w czasie ciążyGinekologia po dyplomielipiec31372011Search in Google Scholar

Matusiak D.: Zagrożenia wynikające z obecności drobnoustrojów chorobotwórczych i ich toksyn w produktach mlecznych. JHSM, 2, 55–76 (2017)MatusiakD.Zagrożenia wynikające z obecności drobnoustrojów chorobotwórczych i ich toksyn w produktach mlecznychJHSM255762017Search in Google Scholar

Mittal R., Liu X.Z. i wsp.: Zika virus: an emerging global health threat. Front. Cell. Infect. Microbiol. DOI: 10.3389/fcimb.2017.00486 (2017)MittalR.LiuX.Z.i wsp.Zika virus: an emerging global health threatFront. Cell. Infect. Microbiol.DOI:10.3389/fcimb.2017.004862017572704329276699Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Musso D., Gubler D.J.: Zika virus. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 29, 487–524 (2016)MussoD.GublerD.J.Zika virusClin. Microbiol. Rev.29487524201610.1128/CMR.00072-15486198627029595Search in Google Scholar

Nelson D.B., Macones G.: Bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: current findings and future directions. Epidemiol. Rev. 24, 102–108 (2002)NelsonD.B.MaconesG.Bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: current findings and future directionsEpidemiol. Rev.24102108200210.1093/epirev/mxf00812762086Search in Google Scholar

Nguyen T.V., Pham V.H., Abe K.: Pathogenesis of congenital rubella virus infection in human fetuses: Viral infection in the ciliary body could play an important role in cataractogenesis. EBioMedicine, 2, 59–63 (2015)NguyenT.V.PhamV.H.AbeK.Pathogenesis of congenital rubella virus infection in human fetuses: Viral infection in the ciliary body could play an important role in cataractogenesisEBioMedicine25963201510.1016/j.ebiom.2014.10.021448450926137534Search in Google Scholar

Noorbakhsh F., Nicknam M.H. i wsp.: Zika virus infection, basic and clinical aspects: a review article. Iran J. Public Health, 48, 20–31 (2019)NoorbakhshF.NicknamM.H.i wsp.Zika virus infection, basic and clinical aspects: a review articleIran J. Public Health482031201910.18502/ijph.v48i1.779Search in Google Scholar

Oancea S., Stoia M.: Mycotoxins: a review of toxicology, analytical methods and health risks. Acta Univ. Cibiniensis, 12, 19–36 (2008)OanceaS.StoiaM.Mycotoxins: a review of toxicology, analytical methods and health risksActa Univ. Cibiniensis1219362008Search in Google Scholar

Ogbuanu I.U., Goodson J.L. i wsp.: Maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcomes associated with measles during pregnancy: Namibia, 2009–2010. Clin. Infect. Dis. 58, 1086–1092 (2014)OgbuanuI.U.GoodsonJ.L.i wsp.Maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcomes associated with measles during pregnancy: Namibia, 2009–2010Clin. Infect. Dis.5810861092201410.1093/cid/ciu03724457343Search in Google Scholar

Omotayo O.P., Omotayo A.O., Mwanza M., Babalola O.O.: Prevalence of mycotoxins and their consequences on human health. Toxicol. Res. 35, 1–7 (2019)OmotayoO.P.OmotayoA.O.MwanzaM.BabalolaO.O.Prevalence of mycotoxins and their consequences on human healthToxicol. Res.3517201910.5487/TR.2019.35.1.001635494530766652Search in Google Scholar

Panchaud A., Stojanov M., Ammerdorffer A., Vouga M., Baud D.: Emerging role of Zika virus in adverse fetal and neonatal outcomes. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 29, 659–694 (2016)PanchaudA.StojanovM.AmmerdorfferA.VougaM.BaudD.Emerging role of Zika virus in adverse fetal and neonatal outcomesClin. Microbiol. Rev.29659694201610.1128/CMR.00014-16497861227281741Search in Google Scholar

Paschale M., Clerici P.: Microbiology laboratory and the management of mother-child varicella-zoster virus infection. World J. Virol. 5, 97–124 (2016)PaschaleM.ClericiP.Microbiology laboratory and the management of mother-child varicella-zoster virus infectionWorld J. Virol.597124201610.5501/wjv.v5.i3.97498182727563537Search in Google Scholar

Pitt J.I.: Toxigenic fungi and mycotoxins. Br. Med. Bull. 56, 184–192 (2000)PittJ.I.Toxigenic fungi and mycotoxinsBr. Med. Bull.56184192200010.1258/000714200190288810885115Search in Google Scholar

Polonio C.M., Freitas C.L., Zanluqui N.G., Peron J.P.S.: Zika virus congenital syndrome: experimental models and clinical aspects. J. Venom. Anim. Toxins Incl. Trop. Dis. DOI: 10.1186/s40409-017-0131-x (2017)PolonioC.M.FreitasC.L.ZanluquiN.G.PeronJ.P.S.Zika virus congenital syndrome: experimental models and clinical aspectsJ. Venom. Anim. Toxins Incl. Trop. Dis.DOI:10.1186/s40409-017-0131-x2017560295628932235Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Rasmussen S.A., Jamieson D.J., Uyeki T.M.: Effects of influenza on pregnant women and infants. J. Obstet. Gynaecol Res. 37, 1877–1882 (2011)RasmussenS.A.JamiesonD.J.UyekiT.M.Effects of influenza on pregnant women and infantsJ. Obstet. Gynaecol Res.37187718822011Search in Google Scholar

Saiz J.C., Vázquez-Calvo A., Blázquez A.B., Merino-Ramos T.: Zika virus: the latest newcomer. Front. Cell. Infect. Microbiol. DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2016.00496 (2016)SaizJ.C.Vázquez-CalvoA.BlázquezA.B.Merino-RamosT.Zika virus: the latest newcomerFront. Cell. Infect. Microbiol.DOI:10.3389/fmicb.2016.004962016483548427148186Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Schleiss M.R.: Congenital cytomegalovirus: impact on child health. Contemp. Pediatr. 35, 16–24 (2018)SchleissM.R.Congenital cytomegalovirus: impact on child healthContemp. Pediatr.3516242018Search in Google Scholar

Seńczuk W. (ed.): Toksykologia współczesna. Wydawnictwo naukowe PZWL, Warszawa, 2017SeńczukW.(ed.):Toksykologia współczesnaWydawnictwo naukowe PZWLWarszawa2017Search in Google Scholar

Sikka V., Chattu V.K., Popli R.K., Galwankar S.C., Kelkar D., Sawicki S.G., Stawicki S.P., Papadimos T.J.: The Emergence of Zika virus as a global health security threat: a review and a consensus statement of the INDUSEM Joint Working Group (JWG). J. Glob. Infect. Dis. 8, 3–15 (2016)SikkaV.ChattuV.K.PopliR.K.GalwankarS.C.KelkarD.SawickiS.G.StawickiS.P.PapadimosT.J.The Emergence of Zika virus as a global health security threat: a review and a consensus statement of the INDUSEM Joint Working Group (JWG)J. Glob. Infect. Dis.8315201610.4103/0974-777X.176140478575427013839Search in Google Scholar

Silasi M., Cardenas I., Racicot K., Kwon J.-Y., Aldo P., Mor G.: Viral infections during pregnancy. Am. J. Reprod. Immunol. 73, 199–213 (2015)SilasiM.CardenasI.RacicotK.KwonJ.-Y.AldoP.MorG.Viral infections during pregnancyAm. J. Reprod. Immunol.73199213201510.1111/aji.12355461003125582523Search in Google Scholar

Silva S.R., Gao S.-J.: Zika virus: an update on epidemiology, pathology, molecular biology, and animal model. J. Med. Virol. 88, 1291–1296 (2016).SilvaS.R.GaoS.-J.Zika virus: an update on epidemiology, pathology, molecular biology, and animal modelJ. Med. Virol.8812911296201610.1002/jmv.24563523536527124623Search in Google Scholar

Silver R.M., Stoll B. i wsp.: Work-up of stillbirth: a review of the evidence. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 196, 433–444 (2007)SilverR.M.StollB.i wsp.Work-up of stillbirth: a review of the evidenceAm. J. Obstet. Gynecol.196433444200710.1016/j.ajog.2006.11.041Search in Google Scholar

Singh S.: Congenital toxoplasmosis: clinical features, outcomes, treatment, and prevention. Trop. Parasitol. 6, 113–122 (2016)SinghS.Congenital toxoplasmosis: clinical features, outcomes, treatment, and preventionTrop. Parasitol.6113122201610.4103/2229-5070.190813Search in Google Scholar

Singhal P., Naswa S., Marfatia Y.S.: Pregnancy and sexually transmitted viral infections. Indian J. Sex Transm. Dis. AIDS, 30, 71–78 (2009)SinghalP.NaswaS.MarfatiaY.S.Pregnancy and sexually transmitted viral infectionsIndian J. Sex Transm. Dis. AIDS307178200910.4103/0253-7184.62761Search in Google Scholar

Stegmann B.J., Carey J.C.: TORCH infections. Curr. Womens Health Rep. 2, 253–258 (2002)StegmannB.J.CareyJ.C.TORCH infectionsCurr. Womens Health Rep.22532582002Search in Google Scholar

Szewczyk E.M. (ed.): Diagnostyka bakteriologiczna. Wydawnictwo naukowe PWN, Warszawa, 2013.SzewczykE.M.(ed.):Diagnostyka bakteriologicznaWydawnictwo naukowe PWNWarszawa2013Search in Google Scholar

Tenter A.M., Heckeroth A.R., Weiss L.M.: Toxoplasma gondii: from animals to humans. Int. J. Parasitol. 30, 1217–1258 (2000)TenterA.M.HeckerothA.R.WeissL.M.Toxoplasma gondii: from animals to humansInt. J. Parasitol.3012171258200010.1016/S0020-7519(00)00124-7Search in Google Scholar

Tomai X.-H.: Stillbirth following severe symmetric fetal growth restriction due to reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus infection in pregnancy. J. Obstet. Gynaecol. 37, 1877–1882 (2011)TomaiX.-H.Stillbirth following severe symmetric fetal growth restriction due to reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus infection in pregnancyJ. Obstet. Gynaecol.3718771882201110.1111/j.1447-0756.2011.01662.x21995502Search in Google Scholar

Traczyk W.Z. (ed.), Trzebski A. (ed.): Fizjologia człowieka z elementami fizjologii klinicznej i stosowanej. Wydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWL, Warszawa, 2015TraczykW.Z.(ed.)TrzebskiA.(ed.):Fizjologia człowieka z elementami fizjologii klinicznej i stosowanejWydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWLWarszawa2015Search in Google Scholar

Vázquez-Boland J.A., Krypotou E., Scortti M.: Listeria placental infection. mBio. DOI: 10.1128/mBio.00949-17 (2017)Vázquez-BolandJ.A.KrypotouE.ScorttiM.Listeria placental infectionmBio.DOI:10.1128/mBio.00949-172017548773528655824Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Waddell L.A., Greig J., Lindsay L.R., Hinckley A.F., Ogden N.H.: A systematic review on the impact of gestational Lyme disease in humans on the fetus and newborn. Plos One. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0207067 (2018)WaddellL.A.GreigJ.LindsayL.R.HinckleyA.F.OgdenN.H.A systematic review on the impact of gestational Lyme disease in humans on the fetus and newbornPlos One.DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.02070672018623164430419059Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Waldorf K.M.A., McAdams R.M.: Influence of infection during pregnancy on fetal development. Reproduction. DOI: 10.1530/REP-13-0232 (2014)WaldorfK.M.A.McAdamsR.M.Influence of infection during pregnancy on fetal developmentReproduction.DOI:10.1530/REP-13-02322014406082723884862Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Wallon M., Peyron F.: Congenital toxoplasmosis: a plea for a neglected disease. Pathogens. DOI: 10.3390/pathogens7010025 (2018)WallonM.PeyronF.Congenital toxoplasmosis: a plea for a neglected diseasePathogens.DOI:10.3390/pathogens70100252018587475129473896Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Wolfe B., Golos T.G. i wsp.: Acute fetal demise with first trimester maternal infection resulting from Listeria monocytogenes in a nonhuman primate model. mBIO. DOI: 10.1128/mBio.01938-16 (2016)WolfeB.GolosT.G.i wsp.Acute fetal demise with first trimester maternal infection resulting from Listeria monocytogenes in a nonhuman primate modelmBIO.DOI:10.1128/mBio.01938-162016535891228223455Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Zammarchi L., Spinicci M., Bartoloni A.: Zika virus: a review from the virus basics to proposed management strategies. Mediterr. J. Hematol. Infect. Dis. DOI: 10.4084/MJHID.2016.056 (2016)ZammarchiL.SpinicciM.BartoloniA.Zika virus: a review from the virus basics to proposed management strategiesMediterr. J. Hematol. Infect. Dis.DOI:10.4084/MJHID.2016.0562016511153927872736Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Zanluca C., Noronha L., Santos C.N.D.: Maternal-fetal transmission of the Zika virus: an intriguing interplay. Tissue Barriers. DOI: 10.1080/21688370.2017.1402143 (2018)ZanlucaC.NoronhaL.SantosC.N.D.Maternal-fetal transmission of the Zika virus: an intriguing interplayTissue Barriers.DOI:10.1080/21688370.2017.14021432018582354829370577Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Zorrilla C.D., García I.G., Fragoso L.G., Vega A.: Zika virus infection in pregnancy: maternal, fetal, and neonatal considerations. J. Infect. Dis. 216, 891–896 (2017)ZorrillaC.D.GarcíaI.G.FragosoL.G.VegaA.Zika virus infection in pregnancy: maternal, fetal, and neonatal considerationsJ. Infect. Dis.216891896201710.1093/infdis/jix448585395129267916Search in Google Scholar

Boyer S.G., Boyer K.M.: Update on TORCH infections in the newborn infant. Newborn Infant Nursing Rev. 4, 70–80 (2004)BoyerS.G.BoyerK.M.Update on TORCH infections in the newborn infantNewborn Infant Nursing Rev.47080200410.1053/j.nainr.2004.01.001Search in Google Scholar

Bręborowicz G.H. (red.): Położnictwo i ginekologia. Tom I. Wydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWL, Warszawa, 2015BręborowiczG.H.(red.):Położnictwo i ginekologiaTomIWydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWLWarszawa2015Search in Google Scholar

Chan J.F.W., Choi G.K.Y., Yip C.C.Y., Cheng V.C.C., Yuen K.-Y.: Zika fever and congenital Zika syndrome: an unexpected emerging arboviral disease. J. Infection, 72, 507–524 (2016)ChanJ.F.W.ChoiG.K.Y.YipC.C.Y.ChengV.C.C.YuenK.-Y.Zika fever and congenital Zika syndrome: an unexpected emerging arboviral diseaseJ. Infection72507524201610.1016/j.jinf.2016.02.011711260326940504Search in Google Scholar

Chhonker S.K., Rawat D., Naik R.A., Koiri R.K.: An overview of mycotoxins in human health with emphasis on development and progression of liver cancer. Clin. Oncol. 3, 1–4 (2018)ChhonkerS.K.RawatD.NaikR.A.KoiriR.K.An overview of mycotoxins in human health with emphasis on development and progression of liver cancerClin. Oncol.3142018Search in Google Scholar

Cohen B.E., Durstenfeld A., Roehm P.C.: Viral causes of hearing loss: a review for hearing health professionals. Trends Hear. 18, 1–17 (2014)CohenB.E.DurstenfeldA.RoehmP.C.Viral causes of hearing loss: a review for hearing health professionalsTrends Hear.18117201410.1177/2331216514541361422218425080364Search in Google Scholar

Dorélien A.: The effects of in utero exposure to influenza on birth and infant outcomes in the US. Popul. Dev. Rev. 45, 489–523 (2019)DorélienA.The effects of in utero exposure to influenza on birth and infant outcomes in the USPopul. Dev. Rev.45489523201910.1111/padr.12232676706631582859Search in Google Scholar

Dubey J.P., Lindsay D.S., Speer C.A.: Structures of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, bradyzoites, and sporozoites and biology and development of tissue cysts. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 11, 267–299 (1998)DubeyJ.P.LindsayD.S.SpeerC.A.Structures of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, bradyzoites, and sporozoites and biology and development of tissue cystsClin. Microbiol. Rev.11267299199810.1128/CMR.11.2.2671068339564564Search in Google Scholar

Eskild A., Bruu A.-L., Stray-Pedersen B., Jenum P.: Epstein-Barr virus infection during pregnancy and the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. Int. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 112, 1620–1624 (2005)EskildA.BruuA.-L.Stray-PedersenB.JenumP.Epstein-Barr virus infection during pregnancy and the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomeInt. J. Obstet. Gynecol.11216201624200510.1111/j.1471-0528.2005.00764.x16305564Search in Google Scholar

Flegr J., Prandota J., Sovickova M., Israili Z.H.: Toxoplasmosis – a global threat. Correlation of latent toxoplasmosis with specific disease burden in a set of 88 countries. Plos One. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090203 (2014)FlegrJ.PrandotaJ.SovickovaM.IsrailiZ.H.Toxoplasmosis – a global threat. Correlation of latent toxoplasmosis with specific disease burden in a set of 88 countriesPlos One.DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.00902032014396385124662942Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Hanzlik E., Gigante J.: Microcephaly. Children, 4, 1–8 (2017)HanzlikE.GiganteJ.MicrocephalyChildren418201710.3390/children4060047548362228598357Search in Google Scholar

Heczko P.B. (red.), Wróblewska M. (red.), Pietrzyk A. (red.): Mikrobiologia lekarska. Wydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWL, Warszawa, 2015HeczkoP.B. (red.), Wróblewska M. (red.), Pietrzyk A.(red.):Mikrobiologia lekarskaWydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWLWarszawa2015Search in Google Scholar

Heerema-McKenney A.: Defense and infection of the human placenta. APMIS, 126, 570–588 (2018)Heerema-McKenneyA.Defense and infection of the human placentaAPMIS126570588201810.1111/apm.1284730129129Search in Google Scholar

Irving W., Boswell T., Ala’Aldeen D.: Mikrobiologia medyczna: Krótkie wykłady. Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN, Warszawa, 2012IrvingW.BoswellT.Ala’AldeenD.Mikrobiologia medyczna: Krótkie wykładyWydawnictwo Naukowe PWNWarszawa2012Search in Google Scholar

Karagiozova D.: Teratogenic agents and related conditions. Texila Int. J. Med. 5, 1–12 (2017)KaragiozovaD.Teratogenic agents and related conditionsTexila Int. J. Med.5112201710.21522/TIJMD.2013.05.02.Art001Search in Google Scholar

Kayser F.H., Bienz K.A., Eckert J., Zinkernagel R.M., Heczko P.B. (red.), Pietrzyk A. (red.): Mikrobiologia Lekarska. Wydawnictwo lekarskie PZWL, Warszawa, 2007KayserF.H.BienzK.A.EckertJ.ZinkernagelR.M.HeczkoP.B.(red.)PietrzykA.(red.):Mikrobiologia LekarskaWydawnictwo lekarskie PZWLWarszawa2007Search in Google Scholar

Klase Z.A., Khakhina S., Schneider A.B., Callahan M.V., Glasspool-Malone J., Malone R.: Zika fetal neuropathogenesis: etiology of a viral syndrome. Plos Negl. Trop. Dis. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004877 (2016)KlaseZ.A.KhakhinaS.SchneiderA.B.CallahanM.V.Glasspool-MaloneJ.MaloneR.Zika fetal neuropathogenesis: etiology of a viral syndromePlos Negl. Trop. Dis.DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.00048772016499927427560129Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Korver A.M.H., Smith R.J.H., Camp G.V., Schleiss M.R., Bitner-Glindzicz M.S.K., Lustig L.R., Usami S.-I., Boudewyns A.N.: Congenital hearing loss. Nat. Rev. Dis. Primers. DOI: 10.1038/nrdp.2016.94 (2018)KorverA.M.H.SmithR.J.H.CampG.V.SchleissM.R.Bitner-GlindziczM.S.K.LustigL.R.UsamiS.-I.BoudewynsA.N.Congenital hearing lossNat. Rev. Dis. Primers.DOI:10.1038/nrdp.2016.942018567503128079113Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Lakos A., Solymosi N.: Maternal Lyme borreliosis and pregnancy outcome. Int. J. Infect. Dis. 14, 494–498 (2010)LakosA.SolymosiN.Maternal Lyme borreliosis and pregnancy outcomeInt. J. Infect. Dis.14494498201010.1016/j.ijid.2009.07.01919926325Search in Google Scholar

Larsen B., Hwang J.: Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma, and adverse pregnancy outcomes: a fresh look. Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol. DOI: 10.1155/2010/521921 (2010)LarsenB.HwangJ.Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma, and adverse pregnancy outcomes: a fresh lookInfect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol.DOI:10.1155/2010/5219212010291366420706675Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Levine D., Jani J.C., Castro-Aragon I., Cannie M.: How does imaging of congenital Zika compare with imaging of other TORCH infections? Radiology, 285, 744–761 (2017)LevineD.JaniJ.C.Castro-AragonI.CannieM.How does imaging of congenital Zika compare with imaging of other TORCH infections?Radiology285744761201710.1148/radiol.201717123829155634Search in Google Scholar

Libudzisz Z. (red.), Kowal K. (red.), Żakowska Z. (red.): Mikrobiologia techniczna tom 2. Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN, Warszawa, 2008LibudziszZ.(red.)KowalK.(red.)ŻakowskaZ.(red.):Mikrobiologia techniczna tom 2Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWNWarszawa2008Search in Google Scholar

Markowska A., Połczyńska-Kaniak E.: Zakażenie parwowirusem B19 w czasie ciąży. Ginekologia po dyplomie, lipiec, 31–37 (2011)MarkowskaA.Połczyńska-KaniakE.Zakażenie parwowirusem B19 w czasie ciążyGinekologia po dyplomielipiec31372011Search in Google Scholar

Matusiak D.: Zagrożenia wynikające z obecności drobnoustrojów chorobotwórczych i ich toksyn w produktach mlecznych. JHSM, 2, 55–76 (2017)MatusiakD.Zagrożenia wynikające z obecności drobnoustrojów chorobotwórczych i ich toksyn w produktach mlecznychJHSM255762017Search in Google Scholar

Mittal R., Liu X.Z. i wsp.: Zika virus: an emerging global health threat. Front. Cell. Infect. Microbiol. DOI: 10.3389/fcimb.2017. 00486 (2017)MittalR.LiuX.Z.i wsp.Zika virus: an emerging global health threatFront. Cell. Infect. Microbiol.DOI:10.3389/fcimb.2017004862017Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Musso D., Gubler D.J.: Zika virus. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 29, 487–524 (2016)MussoD.GublerD.J.Zika virusClin. Microbiol. Rev.29487524201610.1128/CMR.00072-15486198627029595Search in Google Scholar

Nelson D.B., Macones G.: Bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: current findings and future directions. Epidemiol. Rev. 24, 102–108 (2002)NelsonD.B.MaconesG.Bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: current findings and future directionsEpidemiol. Rev.24102108200210.1093/epirev/mxf00812762086Search in Google Scholar

Nguyen T.V., Pham V.H., Abe K.: Pathogenesis of congenital rubella virus infection in human fetuses: Viral infection in the ciliary body could play an important role in cataractogenesis. EBioMedicine, 2, 59–63 (2015)NguyenT.V.PhamV.H.AbeK.Pathogenesis of congenital rubella virus infection in human fetuses: Viral infection in the ciliary body could play an important role in cataractogenesisEBioMedicine25963201510.1016/j.ebiom.2014.10.021448450926137534Search in Google Scholar

Noorbakhsh F., Nicknam M.H. i wsp.: Zika virus infection, basic and clinical aspects: a review article. Iran J. Public Health, 48, 20–31 (2019)NoorbakhshF.NicknamM.H.i wsp.Zika virus infection, basic and clinical aspects: a review articleIran J. Public Health482031201910.18502/ijph.v48i1.779Search in Google Scholar

Oancea S., Stoia M.: Mycotoxins: a review of toxicology, analytical methods and health risks. Acta Univ. Cibiniensis, 12, 19–36 (2008)OanceaS.StoiaM.Mycotoxins: a review of toxicology, analytical methods and health risksActa Univ. Cibiniensis1219362008Search in Google Scholar

Ogbuanu I.U., Goodson J.L. i wsp.: Maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcomes associated with measles during pregnancy: Namibia, 2009–2010. Clin. Infect. Dis. 58, 1086–1092 (2014)OgbuanuI.U.GoodsonJ.L.i wsp.Maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcomes associated with measles during pregnancy: Namibia, 2009–2010Clin. Infect. Dis.5810861092201410.1093/cid/ciu03724457343Search in Google Scholar

Omotayo O.P., Omotayo A.O., Mwanza M., Babalola O.O.: Prevalence of mycotoxins and their consequences on human health. Toxicol. Res. 35, 1–7 (2019)OmotayoO.P.OmotayoA.O.MwanzaM.BabalolaO.O.Prevalence of mycotoxins and their consequences on human healthToxicol. Res.3517201910.5487/TR.2019.35.1.001635494530766652Search in Google Scholar

Panchaud A., Stojanov M., Ammerdorffer A., Vouga M., Baud D.: Emerging role of Zika virus in adverse fetal and neonatal outcomes. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 29, 659–694 (2016)PanchaudA.StojanovM.AmmerdorfferA.VougaM.BaudD.Emerging role of Zika virus in adverse fetal and neonatal outcomesClin. Microbiol. Rev.29659694201610.1128/CMR.00014-16497861227281741Search in Google Scholar

Paschale M., Clerici P.: Microbiology laboratory and the management of mother-child varicella-zoster virus infection. World J. Virol. 5, 97–124 (2016)PaschaleM.ClericiP.Microbiology laboratory and the management of mother-child varicella-zoster virus infectionWorld J. Virol.597124201610.5501/wjv.v5.i3.97498182727563537Search in Google Scholar

Pitt J.I.: Toxigenic fungi and mycotoxins. Br. Med. Bull. 56, 184–192 (2000)PittJ.I.Toxigenic fungi and mycotoxinsBr. Med. Bull.56184192200010.1258/000714200190288810885115Search in Google Scholar

Polonio C.M., Freitas C.L., Zanluqui N.G., Peron J.P.S.: Zika virus congenital syndrome: experimental models and clinical aspects. J. Venom. Anim. Toxins Incl. Trop. Dis. DOI: 10.1186/s40409-017-0131-x (2017)PolonioC.M.FreitasC.L.ZanluquiN.G.PeronJ.P.S.Zika virus congenital syndrome: experimental models and clinical aspectsJ. Venom. Anim. Toxins Incl. Trop. Dis.DOI:10.1186/s40409-017-0131-x2017560295628932235Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Rasmussen S.A., Jamieson D.J., Uyeki T.M.: Effects of influenza on pregnant women and infants. J. Obstet. Gynaecol Res. 37, 1877–1882 (2011)RasmussenS.A.JamiesonD.J.UyekiT.M.Effects of influenza on pregnant women and infantsJ. Obstet. Gynaecol Res.37187718822011Search in Google Scholar

Saiz J.C., Vázquez-Calvo A., Blázquez A.B., Merino-Ramos T.: Zika virus: the latest newcomer. Front. Cell. Infect. Microbiol. DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2016.00496 (2016)SaizJ.C.Vázquez-CalvoA.BlázquezA.B.Merino-RamosT.Zika virus: the latest newcomerFront. Cell. Infect. Microbiol.DOI:10.3389/fmicb.2016.004962016483548427148186Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Schleiss M.R.: Congenital cytomegalovirus: impact on child health. Contemp. Pediatr. 35, 16–24 (2018)SchleissM.R.Congenital cytomegalovirus: impact on child healthContemp. Pediatr.3516242018Search in Google Scholar

Seńczuk W. (red.): Toksykologia współczesna. Wydawnictwo Naukowe PZWL, Warszawa, 2017SeńczukW.(red.):Toksykologia współczesnaWydawnictwo Naukowe PZWLWarszawa2017Search in Google Scholar

Sikka V., Chattu V.K., Popli R.K., Galwankar S.C., Kelkar D., Sawicki S.G., Stawicki S.P., Papadimos T.J.: The Emergence of Zika virus as a global health security threat: a review and a consensus statement of the INDUSEM Joint Working Group (JWG). J. Glob. Infect. Dis. 8, 3–15 (2016)SikkaV.ChattuV.K.PopliR.K.GalwankarS.C.KelkarD.SawickiS.G.StawickiS.P.PapadimosT.J.The Emergence of Zika virus as a global health security threat: a review and a consensus statement of the INDUSEM Joint Working Group (JWG)J. Glob. Infect. Dis.8315201610.4103/0974-777X.176140Search in Google Scholar

Silasi M., Cardenas I., Racicot K., Kwon J.-Y., Aldo P., Mor G.: Viral infections during pregnancy. Am. J. Reprod. Immunol. 73, 199–213 (2015)SilasiM.CardenasI.RacicotK.KwonJ.-Y.AldoP.MorG.Viral infections during pregnancyAm. J. Reprod. Immunol.73199213201510.1111/aji.12355Search in Google Scholar

Silva S.R., Gao S.-J.: Zika virus: an update on epidemiology, pathology, molecular biology, and animal model. J. Med. Virol. 88, 1291–1296 (2016).SilvaS.R.GaoS.-J.Zika virus: an update on epidemiology, pathology, molecular biology, and animal modelJ. Med. Virol.8812911296201610.1002/jmv.24563Search in Google Scholar

Silver R.M., Stoll B. i wsp.: Work-up of stillbirth: a review of the evidence. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 196, 433–444 (2007)SilverR.M.StollB.i wsp.Work-up of stillbirth: a review of the evidenceAm. J. Obstet. Gynecol.196433444200710.1016/j.ajog.2006.11.041Search in Google Scholar

Singh S.: Congenital toxoplasmosis: clinical features, outcomes, treatment, and prevention. Trop. Parasitol. 6, 113–122 (2016)SinghS.Congenital toxoplasmosis: clinical features, outcomes, treatment, and preventionTrop. Parasitol.6113122201610.4103/2229-5070.190813Search in Google Scholar

Singhal P., Naswa S., Marfatia Y.S.: Pregnancy and sexually transmitted viral infections. Indian J. Sex Transm. Dis. AIDS, 30, 71–78 (2009)SinghalP.NaswaS.MarfatiaY.S.Pregnancy and sexually transmitted viral infectionsIndian J. Sex Transm. Dis. AIDS307178200910.4103/0253-7184.62761Search in Google Scholar

Stegmann B.J., Carey J.C.: TORCH infections. Curr. Womens Health Rep. 2, 253–258 (2002)StegmannB.J.CareyJ.C.TORCH infectionsCurr. Womens Health Rep.22532582002Search in Google Scholar

Szewczyk E.M. (red.): Diagnostyka bakteriologiczna. Wydawnictwo naukowe PWN, Warszawa, 2013.SzewczykE.M.(red.):Diagnostyka bakteriologicznaWydawnictwo naukowe PWNWarszawa2013Search in Google Scholar

Tenter A.M., Heckeroth A.R., Weiss L.M.: Toxoplasma gondii: from animals to humans. Int. J. Parasitol. 30, 1217–1258 (2000)TenterA.M.HeckerothA.R.WeissL.M.Toxoplasma gondii: from animals to humansInt. J. Parasitol.3012171258200010.1016/S0020-7519(00)00124-7Search in Google Scholar

Tomai X.-H.: Stillbirth following severe symmetric fetal growth restriction due to reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus infection in pregnancy. J. Obstet. Gynaecol. 37, 1877–1882 (2011)TomaiX.-H.Stillbirth following severe symmetric fetal growth restriction due to reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus infection in pregnancyJ. Obstet. Gynaecol.3718771882201110.1111/j.1447-0756.2011.01662.x21995502Search in Google Scholar

Traczyk W.Z. (red.), Trzebski A. (red.): Fizjologia człowieka z elementami fizjologii klinicznej i stosowanej. Wydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWL, Warszawa, 2015TraczykW.Z.(red.)TrzebskiA.(red.):Fizjologia człowieka z elementami fizjologii klinicznej i stosowanejWydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWLWarszawa2015Search in Google Scholar

Vázquez-Boland J.A., Krypotou E., Scortti M.: Listeria placental infection. mBio, DOI: 10.1128/mBio.00949-17 (2017)Vázquez-BolandJ.A.KrypotouE.ScorttiM.Listeria placental infectionmBiodoi:10.1128/mBio.00949-172017548773528655824Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Waddell L.A., Greig J., Lindsay L.R., Hinckley A.F., Ogden N.H.: A systematic review on the impact of gestational Lyme disease in humans on the fetus and newborn. Plos One. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0207067 (2018)WaddellL.A.GreigJ.LindsayL.R.HinckleyA.F.OgdenN.H.A systematic review on the impact of gestational Lyme disease in humans on the fetus and newbornPlos One.DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.02070672018623164430419059Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Waldorf K.M.A., McAdams R.M.: Influence of infection during pregnancy on fetal development. Reproduction. DOI: 10.1530/REP-13-0232 (2014)WaldorfK.M.A.McAdamsR.M.Influence of infection during pregnancy on fetal developmentReproduction.DOI:10.1530/REP-13-02322014406082723884862Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Wallon M., Peyron F.: Congenital toxoplasmosis: a plea for a neglected disease. Pathogens. DOI: 10.3390/pathogens7010025 (2018)WallonM.PeyronF.Congenital toxoplasmosis: a plea for a neglected diseasePathogens.DOI:10.3390/pathogens70100252018587475129473896Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Wolfe B., Golos T.G. i wsp.: Acute fetal demise with first trimester maternal infection resulting from Listeria monocytogenes in a nonhuman primate model. mBIO. DOI: 10.1128/mBio.01938-16 (2016)WolfeB.GolosT.G.i wsp.Acute fetal demise with first trimester maternal infection resulting from Listeria monocytogenes in a nonhuman primate modelmBIO.DOI:10.1128/mBio.01938-162016535891228223455Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Zammarchi L., Spinicci M., Bartoloni A.: Zika virus: a review from the virus basics to proposed management strategies. Mediterr. J. Hematol. Infect. Dis. DOI: 10.4084/MJHID.2016.056 (2016)ZammarchiL.SpinicciM.BartoloniA.Zika virus: a review from the virus basics to proposed management strategiesMediterr. J. Hematol. Infect. Dis.DOI:10.4084/MJHID.2016.0562016511153927872736Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Zanluca C., Noronha L., Santos C.N.D.: Maternal-fetal transmission of the Zika virus: an intriguing interplay. Tissue Barriers. DOI: 10.1080/21688370.2017.1402143 (2018)ZanlucaC.NoronhaL.SantosC.N.D.Maternal-fetal transmission of the Zika virus: an intriguing interplayTissue Barriers.DOI:10.1080/21688370.2017.14021432018582354829370577Otwórz DOISearch in Google Scholar

Zorrilla C.D., García I.G., Fragoso L.G., Vega A.: Zika virus infection in pregnancy: maternal, fetal, and neonatal considerations. J. Infect. Dis. 216, 891–896 (2017)ZorrillaC.D.GarcíaI.G.FragosoL.G.VegaA.Zika virus infection in pregnancy: maternal, fetal, and neonatal considerationsJ. Infect. Dis.216891896201710.1093/infdis/jix448585395129267916Search in Google Scholar

Polecane artykuły z Trend MD

Zaplanuj zdalną konferencję ze Sciendo