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Volume 94 (2021): Issue 2 (December 2021)

Volume 94 (2021): Issue 1 (July 2021)

Volume 93 (2020): Issue 2 (December 2020)

Volume 93 (2020): Issue 1 (July 2020)

Volume 92 (2019): Issue 2 (December 2019)

Volume 92 (2019): Issue 1 (July 2019)

Volume 91 (2018): Issue 2 (December 2018)

Volume 91 (2018): Issue 1 (July 2018)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2537-5059
First Published
30 Jun 2018
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 91 (2018): Issue 2 (December 2018)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2537-5059
First Published
30 Jun 2018
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

9 Articles
Open Access

Advances in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke: the 2018 American Stroke Association recommendation

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 81 - 88

Abstract

Abstract

The imaging studies should be performed within 20 minutes after arrival and the door-to-needle time should be less than 60 minutes in more than 50 % of the patients. The time-windows and the outcome should be evaluated systematically. If the patient is suitable for intravenous (IV) thrombolysis within 3 hours (based on imaging) only the blood glucose measurement should precede the IV lysis. IV thrombolysis within 3 hours is recommended not only in case of severe stroke, but also in patients with severe isolated symptoms (e.g. aphasia or visual field defect) and in patients with improving paresis. The IV lysis should be considered both in patients on aspirin monotherapy or aspirin+clopidogrel therapy. The criteria for stroke cases between 3 to 4.5 hours became less exclusive: IV intervention can be considered in patients ≥80years, in patients with previous stroke and diabetes and also in patients with INR < 1.7. Mechanical thrombectomy (for interna or media occlusion) can be also considered within 4.5 hours after a non-successful intravenous thrombolysis. Other criteria for mechanical thrombectomy (interna or media occlusion) between 4.5 and 6 hours: NIHSS ≥ 6, ASPECTS score ≥ 6. For patients with interna or media occlusion between 6 and 16 hours, only mechanical thrombectomy could be recommended (by Solitaire or TREVO retriever), if the patient has large penumbra (confirmed by either perfusion CT or MRI and following the criteria of DAWN and DEFUSE-3 studies). Between 16 and 24 hours after stroke, a mechanical thrombectomy can be considered (selected by perfusion CT or MRI), if the patient fulfills DAWN criteria.

Keywords

  • thrombolysis
  • thrombectomy
  • time-window
  • ASPECTS
  • DEFUSE-3
Open Access

The Antidepressants and the Metabolic Syndrome

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 89 - 98

Abstract

Abstract

The relationship between antidepressants (AD) and metabolic syndrome (MS) can be approached from many perspectives. We can start from the mutuality of depression and MS: depression often causes MS and vice versa; however, the two diseases aggravate each other. Altered glucocorticoid secretion - among others - may be a common etiological factor for depression and MS. Enhanced glucocorticoid production leads both to sleep disorders and insulin resistance, and several antidepressants cause obesity and insulin resistance. In addition, sympathetic nervous system activity increases in depression, together with the elevated production of counter-insulin hormones such as catecholamines (adrenaline) and glucocorticoids. From the components of MS, body weight changes can be most easily followed by the patient. The obesogenic mechanisms of AD drugs are different. The H1-receptor blocking agents have the most important weight gaining effect, followed by the 5-HT2c-receptor blocking and/or down-regulating ADs. The fattening effect of mirtazapine, paroxetine, and tricyclic antidepressants are based on such central mechanisms. Blocking of alpha1-receptors contributes to the obesogenic effects of certain drugs by inducing sedation: this has been confirmed in case of imipramine, amitriptyline, and doxepin. Fluoxetine behaves differently depending on the dose and duration of treatment: while at the usual doses it induces weight loss at the beginning of therapy, its initial anorexigenic effects reverses during prolonged use; while its activation effect at high doses is favorable in bulimia. The selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine reduces appetite, similarly to bupropion, which inhibits dopamine reuptake as well. We highlight the effect of fluoxetine on direct adipogenicity, mentioning its preadipocyte-adipocyte transformation-reducing and adipocyte proliferation-inhibiting activity, as well as its ability to enhance fat cell autophagy.

Keywords

  • antidepressants
  • metabolic syndrome
  • central and peripheral mechanisms
  • orexigenic/anorexigenic
  • adipogenesis
Open Access

Liquid chromatographic enantioseparation of thalidomide and its derivatives on cyclodextrin-bonded stationary phases

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 99 - 106

Abstract

Abstract

The chiral separation of three racemic immunomodulatory drugs, thalidomide, pomalidomide and lenalidomide was studied, using three cyclodextrin bonded stationary phases (β-, hydroxypropyl-β- and carboxymethyl-β-CD) in reversed-phase and polar organic mode. In polar organic mode, using acetonitrile and methanol, no chiral separation was observed. In reversed-phase mode pomalidomide showed chiral interactions with all selectors, while lenalidomide showed no chiral interactions with any of the cyclodextrins employed. Thalidomide showed chiral interactions with β-and carboxymethyl-β-CD, only. Based on these observations it can be concluded that the oxo group at position two is necessary for chiral recognition, while the aromatic primary amine group enhances it. Orthogonal experimental design was used to investigate the effect of the eluent composition, flow rate, and the column temperature on chiral separation. Concentration of the organic modifier was the most important factor among the investigated three variables showing high impact on the chiral separations. In the case of thalidomide optimized parameters (β-cyclodextrin-based stationary phase, 0.1% acetic acid/acetonitrile 95/5 (v/v), 5 °C column temperature, 0.6 ml/min flow rate) resulted in a resolution of 1.68 ± 0.02 between enantiomers. For pomalidomide, this value was 2.70 ± 0.02, under the circumstances as follows: β-cyclodextrin-based stationary phase, 0.1% acetic acid/acetonitrile 90/10 (v/v), 15 °C column temperature and 0.8 mL/min flow rate. Utilizing the experimental conditions employed on an LC-MS/MS system, concentrations as low as 2 ng/mL could be determined from mouse plasma for both substances. Elution sequences were determined with enantiopure standards and in both cases the R-enantiomers eluted first. The methods developed are suitable for the chiral separation of the abovementioned compounds and are sound starting points for bioanalytical method development.

Keywords

  • thalidomide
  • pomalidomide
  • cyclodextrin
  • chiral separation
  • cyclodextrin based chiral stationary phase
Open Access

The therapeutic effect of cervical cerclage in pregnancy with cervical incompetence

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 107 - 112

Abstract

Abstract

The shortening of the cervix, cervical incompetence or insufficiency that causes late miscarriage or preterm birth syndrome gives importance and clinical significance for the cervical cerclage or cervical stitch as treatment. Nowadays closure of the cervix with cerclage surgery is an effective way of preventing premature opening of the cervix, helping the pregnancy near due date, thus significantly reducing the risk of miscarriage and premature delivery.

The retrospective longitudinal cohort study is based on an examination of 164 pregnant woman who underwent cervical cerclage surgery at Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic nr. I Târgu-Mureș, between 2000-2017. The McDonald’s method was used in every case that we have studied.

Cerclage surgery was performed in most cases in the second trimester. The results in the study reflect that in the majority of the cases, intervention is effective in preventing premature opening of the cervix. Most women are multipara and had multiple gestational pregnancy, which can also contribute to the weakening and early opening of the cervical closure system. In 66.5% of the cases, at least one abortion or miscarriage is present in the history of the disease, which may also lead to a weakening of the cervical closing function.

Following cerclage surgery, 11.6% abortion and 88.4% in childbirth occurred, and in most cases, intervention can effectively prevent second trimester abortion while reducing the risk of premature birth (65, 8% had no premature birth in our study).

Keywords

  • cervical incompetence
  • second trimester miscarriage
  • premature delivery
  • cervical cerclage
  • cervical stitch
Open Access

Evaluation of knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Tîrgu Mures

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 113 - 118

Abstract

Abstract

Early recognition and intervention in sudden cardiac arrest is crucial for survival. The majority of these cases happen at the victims’ home or in public places, and the first person to act is usually a bystander. The purpose of this study was to assess and to compare bystander’s and third-year medical students’ (who attended first aid courses and training as first year students) knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Tîrgu Mureş. Material and methods: We used a questionnaire, which included 28 questions and was filled in voluntarily by 335 people. We investigated previous cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) experience, willingness to help in an emergency situation and basic knowledge about CPR techniques. Results: Only 15% of bystanders were trained in CPR. The majority (94%) of them knew when they have to resuscitate a person and the correct position the person be in. The location of chest compressions was known by 39% of bystanders and by 78% of third-year medical students, the exact rate of chest compressions by 14% of bystanders and by 66% of medical students. 49% of bystanders had driving license, and even though first aid training was required at driving school, their knowledge was barely better than those who did not have one. Conclusions: Bystander’s knowledge on cardiopulmonary resuscitation is generally poor. To improve it, CPR training courses are needed in the community.

Keywords

  • cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)
  • bystander
  • sudden cardiac arrest
Open Access

To the memory of Pápai Páriz Ferenc. The „Pax Corporis”, a home medical book for people

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 119 - 124

Abstract

Abstract

We present the life, career and memory of Pápai Páriz Ferenc (1649, Dés - 1716, Nagyenyed), professor and rector of the Protestant College of Nagyenyed, the famous Transylvanian humanist, medical doctor, poet, philosopher, church historian, heraldist. He studied in Dés (now Dej, Romania), Gyulafehérvár (now Alba Iulia, Romania), Kolozsvár (now Cluj-Napoca, Romania), Marosvásárhely (now Târgu-Mureş, Romania) and Nagyenyed (now Aiud, Romania). In the spring of 1672 he set off from Nagyenyed for a pedestrian trip abroad. He admired the Treasury in Dresden, and attended medical studies in Leipzig and Heidelberg. He completed his medical studies in Basel. In 1674 he became doctor medicus and was elected member of the board of the medical faculty. He returned to Nagyenyed in 1675. Between 1676 and 1690 he is the physician of the court of the Transylvanian princely couple. In 1678 he got a department in the College of Nagyenyed, extended in 1680 with Greek, physics, natural sciences and medical knowledge departments. Between 1681 and 1715 he was the rector of the College. Above all he cherished peace. He was a versatile writer. His medical book written in Hungarian, the PAX CORPORIS, i.e. “the peace of the body” was printed and published at Kolozsvár in 1690. This was dedicated to the target community: “for the benefit of the stupid poor”, it substituted the physician in the family. The rules of a healthy lifestyle were formulated also. The popularity of the book was proved by those eleven editions we know about. Another great work was the Hungarian-Latin, Latin-Hungarian dictionary (Lőcse, now Levoca, Slovakia, 1708). His memory is kept by a bust and plate in the courtyard of the Protestant College of Nagyenyed. The Hungarian postal service (Magyar Posta) released a stamp on his 350th anniversary. His life, work and importance were appreciated by a number of authors across centuries. An internet search on the terms “Pápai” + “Páriz” + “Ferenc” returns an important number of hits. Many foundations and associations are dedicated to his memory.

Keywords

  • Pápai Páriz Ferenc
  • peregrination
  • Pax corporis
  • peace
  • memory
Open Access

Famous Hungarian chemists and pharmacists – modern chemistry founders: Károly Than

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 125 - 130

Abstract

Abstract

Professor Károly Than was a very talented, widely travelled teacher, intuitive researcher, efficient organizer and public personality. His importance is beyond dispute in the development of Hungarian chemistry. Professor Béla Lengyel and other prominent individuals continued his scientific activity. Lot of honors, paintings, medals and reliefs also justify appreciation of his merits.

Keywords

  • K.Than
  • analytical chemistry
  • pharmaceutical education
Open Access

In memory of Fodor József

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 131 - 135

Abstract

Abstract

Fodor József (1843–1901) is the founder of Hungarian hygiene who established the second hygiene department and hygiene institute in the world; he was a member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. He lived in the era of great microbiological discoveries, and his rich and multidisciplinary work has opened up new directions and approaches in science. For a short period of time he was professor at the newly established university from Cluj (Kolozsvár), later he had important contributions to the Hungarian public health act of 1876. His entire professional career represents a very special model by the messages left behind. He was proposed for Nobel Prize in medical (biological) sciences, but he suddenly died on 20 March 1901.

Keywords

  • medical history
  • hygiene
  • institute of hygiene
  • medical sciences
Open Access

The Appointment as Professor of Zsigmond Purjesz and his Decorations. A Centennial Commemoration

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 137 - 144

Abstract

Abstract

Zsigmond Purjesz (1846–1918) was born at Szentes (Hungary), and he became MD at Budapest in 1870. In 1880 he applied for and won by competition the professor’s chair of Internal Medicine at Cluj/Kolozsvár University. He taught there for three decades, and founded a medical school. In 1911 he retired and moved to Budapest. According to his wish, he was buried at Kolozsvár.

The first part of our study presents the preliminaries of Purjesz’s appointment to Kolozsvár, based on the documents of the Kolozsvár Medical Faculty kept in the State Archives at Marosvásárhely/Târgu Mureş. Endre Takács from Budapest and Ignác Büchler from Kolozsvár were the other two applicants. A board of three university professors proposed Purjesz on the first, Takács on the second and Büchler on the third place to be appointed as professor. On ministerial proposal the king decided to appoint Purjesz on the 2nd of May, 1880.

In the second part of the study we take into account the recognitions and decorations Purjesz got. In 1893 for his activity during the cholera epidemic he was awarded with the Iron-Crown Order, 3rd class. In 1901 he got the title of Court councilor, which implied the form of address “Right Honorable”. In 1906 at the 25th anniversary of his professorship his students and colleagues compiled a memorial volume dedicated to him. In 1910 the Royal City of Kolozsvár declared him Honorary Citizen. Following his retirement his bust made by György Vastagh was unveiled at the courtyard of the hospital. In 1911, the king recognizing his healing and teaching activity raised him to the rank of Hungarian nobility.

Keywords

  • university
  • internal medicine
  • Kolozsvár/Cluj
  • decoration
  • competition
9 Articles
Open Access

Advances in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke: the 2018 American Stroke Association recommendation

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 81 - 88

Abstract

Abstract

The imaging studies should be performed within 20 minutes after arrival and the door-to-needle time should be less than 60 minutes in more than 50 % of the patients. The time-windows and the outcome should be evaluated systematically. If the patient is suitable for intravenous (IV) thrombolysis within 3 hours (based on imaging) only the blood glucose measurement should precede the IV lysis. IV thrombolysis within 3 hours is recommended not only in case of severe stroke, but also in patients with severe isolated symptoms (e.g. aphasia or visual field defect) and in patients with improving paresis. The IV lysis should be considered both in patients on aspirin monotherapy or aspirin+clopidogrel therapy. The criteria for stroke cases between 3 to 4.5 hours became less exclusive: IV intervention can be considered in patients ≥80years, in patients with previous stroke and diabetes and also in patients with INR < 1.7. Mechanical thrombectomy (for interna or media occlusion) can be also considered within 4.5 hours after a non-successful intravenous thrombolysis. Other criteria for mechanical thrombectomy (interna or media occlusion) between 4.5 and 6 hours: NIHSS ≥ 6, ASPECTS score ≥ 6. For patients with interna or media occlusion between 6 and 16 hours, only mechanical thrombectomy could be recommended (by Solitaire or TREVO retriever), if the patient has large penumbra (confirmed by either perfusion CT or MRI and following the criteria of DAWN and DEFUSE-3 studies). Between 16 and 24 hours after stroke, a mechanical thrombectomy can be considered (selected by perfusion CT or MRI), if the patient fulfills DAWN criteria.

Keywords

  • thrombolysis
  • thrombectomy
  • time-window
  • ASPECTS
  • DEFUSE-3
Open Access

The Antidepressants and the Metabolic Syndrome

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 89 - 98

Abstract

Abstract

The relationship between antidepressants (AD) and metabolic syndrome (MS) can be approached from many perspectives. We can start from the mutuality of depression and MS: depression often causes MS and vice versa; however, the two diseases aggravate each other. Altered glucocorticoid secretion - among others - may be a common etiological factor for depression and MS. Enhanced glucocorticoid production leads both to sleep disorders and insulin resistance, and several antidepressants cause obesity and insulin resistance. In addition, sympathetic nervous system activity increases in depression, together with the elevated production of counter-insulin hormones such as catecholamines (adrenaline) and glucocorticoids. From the components of MS, body weight changes can be most easily followed by the patient. The obesogenic mechanisms of AD drugs are different. The H1-receptor blocking agents have the most important weight gaining effect, followed by the 5-HT2c-receptor blocking and/or down-regulating ADs. The fattening effect of mirtazapine, paroxetine, and tricyclic antidepressants are based on such central mechanisms. Blocking of alpha1-receptors contributes to the obesogenic effects of certain drugs by inducing sedation: this has been confirmed in case of imipramine, amitriptyline, and doxepin. Fluoxetine behaves differently depending on the dose and duration of treatment: while at the usual doses it induces weight loss at the beginning of therapy, its initial anorexigenic effects reverses during prolonged use; while its activation effect at high doses is favorable in bulimia. The selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine reduces appetite, similarly to bupropion, which inhibits dopamine reuptake as well. We highlight the effect of fluoxetine on direct adipogenicity, mentioning its preadipocyte-adipocyte transformation-reducing and adipocyte proliferation-inhibiting activity, as well as its ability to enhance fat cell autophagy.

Keywords

  • antidepressants
  • metabolic syndrome
  • central and peripheral mechanisms
  • orexigenic/anorexigenic
  • adipogenesis
Open Access

Liquid chromatographic enantioseparation of thalidomide and its derivatives on cyclodextrin-bonded stationary phases

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 99 - 106

Abstract

Abstract

The chiral separation of three racemic immunomodulatory drugs, thalidomide, pomalidomide and lenalidomide was studied, using three cyclodextrin bonded stationary phases (β-, hydroxypropyl-β- and carboxymethyl-β-CD) in reversed-phase and polar organic mode. In polar organic mode, using acetonitrile and methanol, no chiral separation was observed. In reversed-phase mode pomalidomide showed chiral interactions with all selectors, while lenalidomide showed no chiral interactions with any of the cyclodextrins employed. Thalidomide showed chiral interactions with β-and carboxymethyl-β-CD, only. Based on these observations it can be concluded that the oxo group at position two is necessary for chiral recognition, while the aromatic primary amine group enhances it. Orthogonal experimental design was used to investigate the effect of the eluent composition, flow rate, and the column temperature on chiral separation. Concentration of the organic modifier was the most important factor among the investigated three variables showing high impact on the chiral separations. In the case of thalidomide optimized parameters (β-cyclodextrin-based stationary phase, 0.1% acetic acid/acetonitrile 95/5 (v/v), 5 °C column temperature, 0.6 ml/min flow rate) resulted in a resolution of 1.68 ± 0.02 between enantiomers. For pomalidomide, this value was 2.70 ± 0.02, under the circumstances as follows: β-cyclodextrin-based stationary phase, 0.1% acetic acid/acetonitrile 90/10 (v/v), 15 °C column temperature and 0.8 mL/min flow rate. Utilizing the experimental conditions employed on an LC-MS/MS system, concentrations as low as 2 ng/mL could be determined from mouse plasma for both substances. Elution sequences were determined with enantiopure standards and in both cases the R-enantiomers eluted first. The methods developed are suitable for the chiral separation of the abovementioned compounds and are sound starting points for bioanalytical method development.

Keywords

  • thalidomide
  • pomalidomide
  • cyclodextrin
  • chiral separation
  • cyclodextrin based chiral stationary phase
Open Access

The therapeutic effect of cervical cerclage in pregnancy with cervical incompetence

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 107 - 112

Abstract

Abstract

The shortening of the cervix, cervical incompetence or insufficiency that causes late miscarriage or preterm birth syndrome gives importance and clinical significance for the cervical cerclage or cervical stitch as treatment. Nowadays closure of the cervix with cerclage surgery is an effective way of preventing premature opening of the cervix, helping the pregnancy near due date, thus significantly reducing the risk of miscarriage and premature delivery.

The retrospective longitudinal cohort study is based on an examination of 164 pregnant woman who underwent cervical cerclage surgery at Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic nr. I Târgu-Mureș, between 2000-2017. The McDonald’s method was used in every case that we have studied.

Cerclage surgery was performed in most cases in the second trimester. The results in the study reflect that in the majority of the cases, intervention is effective in preventing premature opening of the cervix. Most women are multipara and had multiple gestational pregnancy, which can also contribute to the weakening and early opening of the cervical closure system. In 66.5% of the cases, at least one abortion or miscarriage is present in the history of the disease, which may also lead to a weakening of the cervical closing function.

Following cerclage surgery, 11.6% abortion and 88.4% in childbirth occurred, and in most cases, intervention can effectively prevent second trimester abortion while reducing the risk of premature birth (65, 8% had no premature birth in our study).

Keywords

  • cervical incompetence
  • second trimester miscarriage
  • premature delivery
  • cervical cerclage
  • cervical stitch
Open Access

Evaluation of knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Tîrgu Mures

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 113 - 118

Abstract

Abstract

Early recognition and intervention in sudden cardiac arrest is crucial for survival. The majority of these cases happen at the victims’ home or in public places, and the first person to act is usually a bystander. The purpose of this study was to assess and to compare bystander’s and third-year medical students’ (who attended first aid courses and training as first year students) knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Tîrgu Mureş. Material and methods: We used a questionnaire, which included 28 questions and was filled in voluntarily by 335 people. We investigated previous cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) experience, willingness to help in an emergency situation and basic knowledge about CPR techniques. Results: Only 15% of bystanders were trained in CPR. The majority (94%) of them knew when they have to resuscitate a person and the correct position the person be in. The location of chest compressions was known by 39% of bystanders and by 78% of third-year medical students, the exact rate of chest compressions by 14% of bystanders and by 66% of medical students. 49% of bystanders had driving license, and even though first aid training was required at driving school, their knowledge was barely better than those who did not have one. Conclusions: Bystander’s knowledge on cardiopulmonary resuscitation is generally poor. To improve it, CPR training courses are needed in the community.

Keywords

  • cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)
  • bystander
  • sudden cardiac arrest
Open Access

To the memory of Pápai Páriz Ferenc. The „Pax Corporis”, a home medical book for people

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 119 - 124

Abstract

Abstract

We present the life, career and memory of Pápai Páriz Ferenc (1649, Dés - 1716, Nagyenyed), professor and rector of the Protestant College of Nagyenyed, the famous Transylvanian humanist, medical doctor, poet, philosopher, church historian, heraldist. He studied in Dés (now Dej, Romania), Gyulafehérvár (now Alba Iulia, Romania), Kolozsvár (now Cluj-Napoca, Romania), Marosvásárhely (now Târgu-Mureş, Romania) and Nagyenyed (now Aiud, Romania). In the spring of 1672 he set off from Nagyenyed for a pedestrian trip abroad. He admired the Treasury in Dresden, and attended medical studies in Leipzig and Heidelberg. He completed his medical studies in Basel. In 1674 he became doctor medicus and was elected member of the board of the medical faculty. He returned to Nagyenyed in 1675. Between 1676 and 1690 he is the physician of the court of the Transylvanian princely couple. In 1678 he got a department in the College of Nagyenyed, extended in 1680 with Greek, physics, natural sciences and medical knowledge departments. Between 1681 and 1715 he was the rector of the College. Above all he cherished peace. He was a versatile writer. His medical book written in Hungarian, the PAX CORPORIS, i.e. “the peace of the body” was printed and published at Kolozsvár in 1690. This was dedicated to the target community: “for the benefit of the stupid poor”, it substituted the physician in the family. The rules of a healthy lifestyle were formulated also. The popularity of the book was proved by those eleven editions we know about. Another great work was the Hungarian-Latin, Latin-Hungarian dictionary (Lőcse, now Levoca, Slovakia, 1708). His memory is kept by a bust and plate in the courtyard of the Protestant College of Nagyenyed. The Hungarian postal service (Magyar Posta) released a stamp on his 350th anniversary. His life, work and importance were appreciated by a number of authors across centuries. An internet search on the terms “Pápai” + “Páriz” + “Ferenc” returns an important number of hits. Many foundations and associations are dedicated to his memory.

Keywords

  • Pápai Páriz Ferenc
  • peregrination
  • Pax corporis
  • peace
  • memory
Open Access

Famous Hungarian chemists and pharmacists – modern chemistry founders: Károly Than

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 125 - 130

Abstract

Abstract

Professor Károly Than was a very talented, widely travelled teacher, intuitive researcher, efficient organizer and public personality. His importance is beyond dispute in the development of Hungarian chemistry. Professor Béla Lengyel and other prominent individuals continued his scientific activity. Lot of honors, paintings, medals and reliefs also justify appreciation of his merits.

Keywords

  • K.Than
  • analytical chemistry
  • pharmaceutical education
Open Access

In memory of Fodor József

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 131 - 135

Abstract

Abstract

Fodor József (1843–1901) is the founder of Hungarian hygiene who established the second hygiene department and hygiene institute in the world; he was a member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. He lived in the era of great microbiological discoveries, and his rich and multidisciplinary work has opened up new directions and approaches in science. For a short period of time he was professor at the newly established university from Cluj (Kolozsvár), later he had important contributions to the Hungarian public health act of 1876. His entire professional career represents a very special model by the messages left behind. He was proposed for Nobel Prize in medical (biological) sciences, but he suddenly died on 20 March 1901.

Keywords

  • medical history
  • hygiene
  • institute of hygiene
  • medical sciences
Open Access

The Appointment as Professor of Zsigmond Purjesz and his Decorations. A Centennial Commemoration

Published Online: 25 Nov 2019
Page range: 137 - 144

Abstract

Abstract

Zsigmond Purjesz (1846–1918) was born at Szentes (Hungary), and he became MD at Budapest in 1870. In 1880 he applied for and won by competition the professor’s chair of Internal Medicine at Cluj/Kolozsvár University. He taught there for three decades, and founded a medical school. In 1911 he retired and moved to Budapest. According to his wish, he was buried at Kolozsvár.

The first part of our study presents the preliminaries of Purjesz’s appointment to Kolozsvár, based on the documents of the Kolozsvár Medical Faculty kept in the State Archives at Marosvásárhely/Târgu Mureş. Endre Takács from Budapest and Ignác Büchler from Kolozsvár were the other two applicants. A board of three university professors proposed Purjesz on the first, Takács on the second and Büchler on the third place to be appointed as professor. On ministerial proposal the king decided to appoint Purjesz on the 2nd of May, 1880.

In the second part of the study we take into account the recognitions and decorations Purjesz got. In 1893 for his activity during the cholera epidemic he was awarded with the Iron-Crown Order, 3rd class. In 1901 he got the title of Court councilor, which implied the form of address “Right Honorable”. In 1906 at the 25th anniversary of his professorship his students and colleagues compiled a memorial volume dedicated to him. In 1910 the Royal City of Kolozsvár declared him Honorary Citizen. Following his retirement his bust made by György Vastagh was unveiled at the courtyard of the hospital. In 1911, the king recognizing his healing and teaching activity raised him to the rank of Hungarian nobility.

Keywords

  • university
  • internal medicine
  • Kolozsvár/Cluj
  • decoration
  • competition

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