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Volume 8 (2022): Issue 4 (October 2022)

Volume 8 (2022): Issue 3 (July 2022)

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Volume 7 (2021): Issue 4 (October 2021)

Volume 7 (2021): Issue 3 (July 2021)

Volume 7 (2021): Issue 2 (April 2021)

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Volume 6 (2020): Issue 4 (October 2020)

Volume 6 (2020): Issue 3 (July 2020)

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Volume 5 (2019): Issue 4 (October 2019)

Volume 5 (2019): Issue 3 (July 2019)

Volume 5 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)

Volume 5 (2019): Issue 1 (January 2019)

Volume 4 (2018): Issue 4 (October 2018)

Volume 4 (2018): Issue 3 (July 2018)

Volume 4 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 4 (2018): Issue 1 (January 2018)

Volume 3 (2017): Issue 4 (October 2017)

Volume 3 (2017): Issue 3 (July 2017)

Volume 3 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 3 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 2 (2016): Issue 4 (October 2016)

Volume 2 (2016): Issue 3 (July 2016)

Volume 2 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 2 (2016): Issue 1 (January 2016)

Volume 1 (2015): Issue 4 (October 2015)

Volume 1 (2015): Issue 3 (July 2015)

Volume 1 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 1 (2015): Issue 1 (January 2015)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2393-1817
First Published
30 Mar 2015
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 5 (2019): Issue 3 (July 2019)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2393-1817
First Published
30 Mar 2015
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

6 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Perioperative Care for Organ Transplant Recipient: Time for Paradigm Shift

Published Online: 09 Aug 2019
Page range: 87 - 89

Abstract

Review

Open Access

Precision Medicine and its Role in the Treatment of Sepsis: A Personalised View

Published Online: 09 Aug 2019
Page range: 90 - 96

Abstract

Abstract

In recent years, a new form of medicine has become increasingly significant, namely, personalised medicine (PM). PM is a form of care in which treatment is tailored for an individual patient.

PM is about using multiple data sets to create a digital human mapping. A person’s biological traits are determined by the interactions of hundreds of genes and gene networks, as well as external factors such as diet and exercise. Combining and then investigating these multiple databases with powerful statistical tools, allows a new understanding of how genetic intricacy drives health and disease and so leads to a closer personalised medical approach that targets each individual’s unique genetic make-up.

Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection, ranging from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) to septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS). Sepsis is the most common cause of death in intensive care patients. Treatments in an ICU may need to be adapted to the continuous and rapid changes of the disease, making it challenging to identify a single target. PM is thus seen as the future of sepsis treatment in the ICU.

The fact that individual patients respond differently to treatment should be regarded as a starting point in the approach to providing treatment. The disease itself comes secondary to this concept.

Keywords

  • precision medicine
  • intensive care
  • sepsis
  • multiple datasets
  • genome

Research Article

Open Access

Determination of Cut-off Serum Values for Resistin and S100B Protein in Patients Who Survived a Cardiac Arrest

Published Online: 09 Aug 2019
Page range: 97 - 102

Abstract

Abstract

In an attempt to identify patients who have successfully survived a resuscitated cardiac arrest (CA), attention is drawn to resistin and S100B protein, two biomarkers that have been studied in relation to CA.

The study aimed to identify the potential cut-off serum values for resistin and S100B in patients who had CA, compared to healthy volunteers, given that, currently, none of the markers have normal and pathological reference range limits for human assay levels related to this pathology.

Forty patients, resuscitated after out-of-hospital CA and forty healthy controls, were included in the study. All patients were followed up for seventy-two hours after CA or until death. Blood samples for biomarkers were collected on admission to the ED (0-time interval) and at 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours following resuscitation. Only one blood sample was collected from the controls. The serum concentrations of biomarkers were measured.

For each time interval, median serum levels of resistin and S100 B were ​ significantly higher in patients with CA compared to healthy controls. The cut-of value for resistin in patients with CA, at the 12-hours versus controls, was > 8.2 ng/ml. The cut-of value for S100B in patients with CA versus controls recorded at 6 hours, was > 11.6 pg/ml.

Serum levels of resistin and S100B are higher among resuscitated CA patients compared to controls.

Keywords

  • resistin
  • S100B protein
  • biomarkers
  • cardiac arrest

Case Report

Open Access

Cervical Spine Spondylitis with an Epidural Abscess in a Patient with Brucellosis: A Case Report

Published Online: 09 Aug 2019
Page range: 103 - 106

Abstract

Abstract

Human brucellosis, the most prevalent zoonotic disease worldwide, is a systemic infection which can involve several organs. Among musculoskeletal complaints, spondylitis is the most frequent complication of brucellosis and primarily affects the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. The involvement of the cervical spine is infrequent.

This case report concerns an unusual case of cervical spine spondylitis with an epidural abscess due to Brucella in a 43-year-old man. The diagnosis was based on the patient being domiciled in an endemic region, his symptoms and his occupation. Clinical outcomes improved following antimicrobial therapy of rifampin, doxycycline, and gentamycin, and were confirmed radiologically.

Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for these patients. The timely commencement of medical treatment can help prevent surgery.

Keywords

  • cervical spine spondylitis
  • brucellosis
Open Access

Locked-In Syndrome Following Cervical Manipulation by a Chiropractor: A Case Report

Published Online: 09 Aug 2019
Page range: 107 - 110

Abstract

Abstract

Vertebrobasilar occlusion poses difficult diagnostic issues and even when properly diagnosed has a poor prognosis. Newer studies highlight a better outcome when thrombectomy was carried out between six and twenty-four hours after an initial diagnosis of stroke. This paper reports a case where a patient suffered a vertebrobasilar stroke secondary to a traumatic bilateral vertebral arteries dissection was treated with late thrombectomy.

A 34-year-old woman was manipulated on the cervical spinal column by a chiropractor. Following three weeks of cervical pain, she presented with severe aphasia and quadriplegia (NIHSS = 28). An MRI scan indicated ischemia of the vertebrobasilar system. Thirty-one hours after the onset of these symptoms, a thrombectomy was performed. After one month, the patient could move her head and the proximal part of her limbs but remained confined to bed (NIHSS = 13).

The current case illustrates the benefit of late mechanical thrombectomy for a posterior cerebral circulation infarct. Although there was a delay in treatment, partial recovery ensued.

Keywords

  • locked-in syndrome
  • stroke
  • vertebral artery dissection
  • thrombectomy
Open Access

The Management of a Thirteen Weeks Pregnant Woman Rendered Brain-Dead Following a Ruptured Aneurysm

Published Online: 09 Aug 2019
Page range: 111 - 114

Abstract

Abstract

The current lack of clear guidelines on how to manage cases of brain-dead pregnant patients makes this topic controversial and extremely difficult to deal with for both medical and ethical reasons. This report deals with such a situation.

A twenty-seven years old woman, thirteen weeks pregnant, with a ruptured brain aneurysm was admitted to an Intensive Care Unit. She presented with loss of all brain functions, but somatic support was sustained to enable the delivery of her baby.

The case report gives a detailed account of the management of the mother before the successful delivery of her baby. It indicates the need for ongoing contributions to the debate on this delicate subject area to establish guidelines on how to manage brain-dead pregnant patients.

Keywords

  • brain-death
  • somatic support
  • pregnancy
  • foetus
  • ethics
6 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Perioperative Care for Organ Transplant Recipient: Time for Paradigm Shift

Published Online: 09 Aug 2019
Page range: 87 - 89

Abstract

Review

Open Access

Precision Medicine and its Role in the Treatment of Sepsis: A Personalised View

Published Online: 09 Aug 2019
Page range: 90 - 96

Abstract

Abstract

In recent years, a new form of medicine has become increasingly significant, namely, personalised medicine (PM). PM is a form of care in which treatment is tailored for an individual patient.

PM is about using multiple data sets to create a digital human mapping. A person’s biological traits are determined by the interactions of hundreds of genes and gene networks, as well as external factors such as diet and exercise. Combining and then investigating these multiple databases with powerful statistical tools, allows a new understanding of how genetic intricacy drives health and disease and so leads to a closer personalised medical approach that targets each individual’s unique genetic make-up.

Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection, ranging from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) to septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS). Sepsis is the most common cause of death in intensive care patients. Treatments in an ICU may need to be adapted to the continuous and rapid changes of the disease, making it challenging to identify a single target. PM is thus seen as the future of sepsis treatment in the ICU.

The fact that individual patients respond differently to treatment should be regarded as a starting point in the approach to providing treatment. The disease itself comes secondary to this concept.

Keywords

  • precision medicine
  • intensive care
  • sepsis
  • multiple datasets
  • genome

Research Article

Open Access

Determination of Cut-off Serum Values for Resistin and S100B Protein in Patients Who Survived a Cardiac Arrest

Published Online: 09 Aug 2019
Page range: 97 - 102

Abstract

Abstract

In an attempt to identify patients who have successfully survived a resuscitated cardiac arrest (CA), attention is drawn to resistin and S100B protein, two biomarkers that have been studied in relation to CA.

The study aimed to identify the potential cut-off serum values for resistin and S100B in patients who had CA, compared to healthy volunteers, given that, currently, none of the markers have normal and pathological reference range limits for human assay levels related to this pathology.

Forty patients, resuscitated after out-of-hospital CA and forty healthy controls, were included in the study. All patients were followed up for seventy-two hours after CA or until death. Blood samples for biomarkers were collected on admission to the ED (0-time interval) and at 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours following resuscitation. Only one blood sample was collected from the controls. The serum concentrations of biomarkers were measured.

For each time interval, median serum levels of resistin and S100 B were ​ significantly higher in patients with CA compared to healthy controls. The cut-of value for resistin in patients with CA, at the 12-hours versus controls, was > 8.2 ng/ml. The cut-of value for S100B in patients with CA versus controls recorded at 6 hours, was > 11.6 pg/ml.

Serum levels of resistin and S100B are higher among resuscitated CA patients compared to controls.

Keywords

  • resistin
  • S100B protein
  • biomarkers
  • cardiac arrest

Case Report

Open Access

Cervical Spine Spondylitis with an Epidural Abscess in a Patient with Brucellosis: A Case Report

Published Online: 09 Aug 2019
Page range: 103 - 106

Abstract

Abstract

Human brucellosis, the most prevalent zoonotic disease worldwide, is a systemic infection which can involve several organs. Among musculoskeletal complaints, spondylitis is the most frequent complication of brucellosis and primarily affects the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. The involvement of the cervical spine is infrequent.

This case report concerns an unusual case of cervical spine spondylitis with an epidural abscess due to Brucella in a 43-year-old man. The diagnosis was based on the patient being domiciled in an endemic region, his symptoms and his occupation. Clinical outcomes improved following antimicrobial therapy of rifampin, doxycycline, and gentamycin, and were confirmed radiologically.

Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for these patients. The timely commencement of medical treatment can help prevent surgery.

Keywords

  • cervical spine spondylitis
  • brucellosis
Open Access

Locked-In Syndrome Following Cervical Manipulation by a Chiropractor: A Case Report

Published Online: 09 Aug 2019
Page range: 107 - 110

Abstract

Abstract

Vertebrobasilar occlusion poses difficult diagnostic issues and even when properly diagnosed has a poor prognosis. Newer studies highlight a better outcome when thrombectomy was carried out between six and twenty-four hours after an initial diagnosis of stroke. This paper reports a case where a patient suffered a vertebrobasilar stroke secondary to a traumatic bilateral vertebral arteries dissection was treated with late thrombectomy.

A 34-year-old woman was manipulated on the cervical spinal column by a chiropractor. Following three weeks of cervical pain, she presented with severe aphasia and quadriplegia (NIHSS = 28). An MRI scan indicated ischemia of the vertebrobasilar system. Thirty-one hours after the onset of these symptoms, a thrombectomy was performed. After one month, the patient could move her head and the proximal part of her limbs but remained confined to bed (NIHSS = 13).

The current case illustrates the benefit of late mechanical thrombectomy for a posterior cerebral circulation infarct. Although there was a delay in treatment, partial recovery ensued.

Keywords

  • locked-in syndrome
  • stroke
  • vertebral artery dissection
  • thrombectomy
Open Access

The Management of a Thirteen Weeks Pregnant Woman Rendered Brain-Dead Following a Ruptured Aneurysm

Published Online: 09 Aug 2019
Page range: 111 - 114

Abstract

Abstract

The current lack of clear guidelines on how to manage cases of brain-dead pregnant patients makes this topic controversial and extremely difficult to deal with for both medical and ethical reasons. This report deals with such a situation.

A twenty-seven years old woman, thirteen weeks pregnant, with a ruptured brain aneurysm was admitted to an Intensive Care Unit. She presented with loss of all brain functions, but somatic support was sustained to enable the delivery of her baby.

The case report gives a detailed account of the management of the mother before the successful delivery of her baby. It indicates the need for ongoing contributions to the debate on this delicate subject area to establish guidelines on how to manage brain-dead pregnant patients.

Keywords

  • brain-death
  • somatic support
  • pregnancy
  • foetus
  • ethics

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