Issues

Journal & Issues

Volume 24 (2022): Issue 1 (October 2022)

Volume 23 (2020): Issue 2 (December 2020)

Volume 23 (2020): Issue 1 (July 2020)

Volume 22 (2019): Issue 2 (December 2019)

Volume 22 (2019): Issue 1 (July 2019)

Volume 21 (2018): Issue 2 (December 2018)

Volume 21 (2018): Issue 1 (July 2018)

Volume 20 (2017): Issue 2 (December 2017)

Volume 20 (2017): Issue 1 (June 2017)

Volume 19 (2016): Issue 2 (December 2016)

Volume 19 (2016): Issue 1 (July 2016)

Volume 18 (2015): Issue 2 (December 2015)

Volume 18 (2015): Issue 1 (July 2015)

Volume 17 (2014): Issue 2 (December 2014)

Volume 17 (2014): Issue 1 (July 2014)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1027-5207
First Published
11 Dec 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 24 (2022): Issue 1 (October 2022)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1027-5207
First Published
11 Dec 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

2 Articles

Research Article

Open Access

A Device Free Lunch Break program: An experiment to promote a balanced used of electronic devices in Middle Secondary International schools.

Published Online: 20 Oct 2022
Page range: 1 - 10

Abstract

Abstract

Since the introduction of a Bring Your Own iPad scheme in the Middle Years section of a large International School, concerns have been raised from school community members regarding students’ overuse of their devices, especially during lunch breaks. Hence, the device free lunch break (DFLB) programme was introduced with the aim of reinforcing existing guidance for students about achieving and maintaining a balanced approach to their use of devices. The DFLB programme was planned based on market research strategies and included all the school community members including students, parents/guardians and staff. The findings from statistical analysis of the data showed significant similarities between staff and parents/guardians’ perceptions of student device use in terms of the student overuse of electronic devices. However, analysis showed that the opinions of parent/guardians and staff contrasted those expressed by students. The data also showed evidence that the introduction of the DFLB programme resulted in increased student recognition of the importance of making face-to-face social contacts with their classmates during their lunch break.

Keywords

  • device balanced use
  • middle secondary schools
  • BYOD
  • t-paired test
  • mobile learning
Open Access

Avatar-based virtual reality and the associated gender stereotypes in a university environment

Published Online: 20 Oct 2022
Page range: 11 - 24

Abstract

Abstract

Avatar-based virtual reality (VR) is becoming more prevalent in industry and educational settings. There is, however, limited research on the extent to which gender stereotypes are present in this environment. The university laboratory study presented in this paper was conducted in a VR environment with participants who were randomly assigned to male or female avatars and instructed to negotiate the role of a manager or member of staff. The results reveal differences in satisfaction regarding their roles and gender. Participants who embodied a female avatar were less happy when they were subordinates interacting with a male avatar, compared to participants embodying a male avatar in the staff role (interacting with a female avatar). Male avatars with staff roles were also more content with their avatar than male avatars with manager roles and also reported being more comfortable in the VR experience. Relevant for diversity management when integrating VR in education and business, the results are discussed in regard to self-similarity and social identity dynamics and provide insight into understanding the extent to which gender stereotypes may be present in avatar-based VR.

Keywords

  • Computer-mediated communication
  • Virtual reality
  • Gender stereotypes
2 Articles

Research Article

Open Access

A Device Free Lunch Break program: An experiment to promote a balanced used of electronic devices in Middle Secondary International schools.

Published Online: 20 Oct 2022
Page range: 1 - 10

Abstract

Abstract

Since the introduction of a Bring Your Own iPad scheme in the Middle Years section of a large International School, concerns have been raised from school community members regarding students’ overuse of their devices, especially during lunch breaks. Hence, the device free lunch break (DFLB) programme was introduced with the aim of reinforcing existing guidance for students about achieving and maintaining a balanced approach to their use of devices. The DFLB programme was planned based on market research strategies and included all the school community members including students, parents/guardians and staff. The findings from statistical analysis of the data showed significant similarities between staff and parents/guardians’ perceptions of student device use in terms of the student overuse of electronic devices. However, analysis showed that the opinions of parent/guardians and staff contrasted those expressed by students. The data also showed evidence that the introduction of the DFLB programme resulted in increased student recognition of the importance of making face-to-face social contacts with their classmates during their lunch break.

Keywords

  • device balanced use
  • middle secondary schools
  • BYOD
  • t-paired test
  • mobile learning
Open Access

Avatar-based virtual reality and the associated gender stereotypes in a university environment

Published Online: 20 Oct 2022
Page range: 11 - 24

Abstract

Abstract

Avatar-based virtual reality (VR) is becoming more prevalent in industry and educational settings. There is, however, limited research on the extent to which gender stereotypes are present in this environment. The university laboratory study presented in this paper was conducted in a VR environment with participants who were randomly assigned to male or female avatars and instructed to negotiate the role of a manager or member of staff. The results reveal differences in satisfaction regarding their roles and gender. Participants who embodied a female avatar were less happy when they were subordinates interacting with a male avatar, compared to participants embodying a male avatar in the staff role (interacting with a female avatar). Male avatars with staff roles were also more content with their avatar than male avatars with manager roles and also reported being more comfortable in the VR experience. Relevant for diversity management when integrating VR in education and business, the results are discussed in regard to self-similarity and social identity dynamics and provide insight into understanding the extent to which gender stereotypes may be present in avatar-based VR.

Keywords

  • Computer-mediated communication
  • Virtual reality
  • Gender stereotypes

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