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Journal & Issues

Volume 12 (2021): Issue 1 (January 2021)

Volume 11 (2020): Issue 1 (January 2020)

Volume 10 (2018): Issue 1 (June 2018)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2639-6416
First Published
01 Apr 2004
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 12 (2021): Issue 1 (January 2021)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2639-6416
First Published
01 Apr 2004
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English

Search

5 Articles
Open Access

OBESITY IN AVIATION MEDICINE

Published Online: 29 Jan 2021
Page range: 1 - 6

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This paper will examine the impacts of obesity in aviation medicine. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has described the problems of obesity and being overweight as one of the greatest public health challenges of the 21st century (1) and this will certainly lead to increasing numbers of obese aviators (or potential aviators) presenting for medical certification. These people may not realise the impact their increased weight could have on their flying career and is often going to be an incidental finding in their examination rather than the specific problem they present with. This leads to the question for the medical examiner, does being overweight/obese matter in aviation and how might it increase a person’s risk of incapacitation in the cockpit?

Open Access

EDITORIAL

Published Online: 29 Jan 2021
Page range: 1 - 1

Abstract

Open Access

CHALLENGES OF COVID-19 AEROMEDICAL RETRIEVAL: LESSONS LEARNT FROM CONDUCTING AEROMEDICAL TRANSFERS DURING A PANDEMIC

Published Online: 29 Jan 2021
Page range: 1 - 5

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a unique and challenging environment for aeromedical organisations. We present lessons learnt during the development and implementation of our operational processes and procedures at The Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) Western Operations for the transfer of suspected COVID-19 patients. To date, we have conducted 105 such fixed-wing transfers. The unique geography and health care system of Western Australia mandates that long-range, fixed-wing transfers are often required to centralised tertiary care. These lessons learnt provide a framework for the essential logistical, equipment and human factor considerations for developing an effective system. The translation of predominantly hospital-centric protocols into the aviation environment requires careful forethought, effective leadership and teamwork. Conducting COVID-19 suspected aeromedical retrievals significantly impacts all aeromedical retrieval operations and aeromedical personnel that should be realised by an aeromedical organisation.

Keywords

  • Aeromedical
  • Air Ambulances
  • COVID-19
  • PPE
  • decontamination
Open Access

FUNDAMENTAL LESSONS OF THE FIRST HUMAN VERTICAL ROCKET FLIGHT

Published Online: 29 Jan 2021
Page range: 1 - 12

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This paper examines the historic but tragic first human vertical rocket flight which took place in south-western Germany on 1 March 1945. The primary lesson learned from the flight was that, as a result of the combination of psychological and physiological stresses, a human pilot could not be expected to fly a vertically launched rocket manually. An autopilot would be essential for the guidance of the Natter rocket interceptor up to its operational altitude. No further human vertical rocket flights took place until 1961 when Major Yuri Gagarin was launched into orbit. In early April 1945 a fully operational Natter flew successfully into the lower stratosphere under the control of a three-axis autopilot and crewed with a dummy pilot. Both dummy pilot and rear fuselage were recovered successfully under separate parachutes. In less than a year the engineers and scientists in collaboration with aviation physicians and physiologists at research institutions across Germany had laid down the basic principles which still apply to human rocket flight today.

Open Access

VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM

Published Online: 29 Jan 2021
Page range: 1 - 6

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the condition in which blood clots form within the venous circulatory system, and consist of DVT (deep vein thrombosis) and PEs (Pulmonary emboli).

It is a common condition, with an estimated life-time risk of 8% and an annual incidence of 0.84-1 per 1000 population1, 2 and represents a significant economic burden: within Australia the annual estimated cost in 2018 being $1.72 billion AUD3.

The condition is considered aeromedically significant for both aircrew and passengers; diagnosis and treatment may have implications on an aviators medical certificate and the general public are often concerned about developing “economy class syndrome”.

This paper reviews the pathophysiology of VTE, the relationship between VTE and its treatment in the aviation environment. It also reviews some of the international aeromedical regulatory guidelines and provides a suggested approach to certification in case of VTE.

5 Articles
Open Access

OBESITY IN AVIATION MEDICINE

Published Online: 29 Jan 2021
Page range: 1 - 6

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This paper will examine the impacts of obesity in aviation medicine. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has described the problems of obesity and being overweight as one of the greatest public health challenges of the 21st century (1) and this will certainly lead to increasing numbers of obese aviators (or potential aviators) presenting for medical certification. These people may not realise the impact their increased weight could have on their flying career and is often going to be an incidental finding in their examination rather than the specific problem they present with. This leads to the question for the medical examiner, does being overweight/obese matter in aviation and how might it increase a person’s risk of incapacitation in the cockpit?

Open Access

EDITORIAL

Published Online: 29 Jan 2021
Page range: 1 - 1

Abstract

Open Access

CHALLENGES OF COVID-19 AEROMEDICAL RETRIEVAL: LESSONS LEARNT FROM CONDUCTING AEROMEDICAL TRANSFERS DURING A PANDEMIC

Published Online: 29 Jan 2021
Page range: 1 - 5

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a unique and challenging environment for aeromedical organisations. We present lessons learnt during the development and implementation of our operational processes and procedures at The Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) Western Operations for the transfer of suspected COVID-19 patients. To date, we have conducted 105 such fixed-wing transfers. The unique geography and health care system of Western Australia mandates that long-range, fixed-wing transfers are often required to centralised tertiary care. These lessons learnt provide a framework for the essential logistical, equipment and human factor considerations for developing an effective system. The translation of predominantly hospital-centric protocols into the aviation environment requires careful forethought, effective leadership and teamwork. Conducting COVID-19 suspected aeromedical retrievals significantly impacts all aeromedical retrieval operations and aeromedical personnel that should be realised by an aeromedical organisation.

Keywords

  • Aeromedical
  • Air Ambulances
  • COVID-19
  • PPE
  • decontamination
Open Access

FUNDAMENTAL LESSONS OF THE FIRST HUMAN VERTICAL ROCKET FLIGHT

Published Online: 29 Jan 2021
Page range: 1 - 12

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This paper examines the historic but tragic first human vertical rocket flight which took place in south-western Germany on 1 March 1945. The primary lesson learned from the flight was that, as a result of the combination of psychological and physiological stresses, a human pilot could not be expected to fly a vertically launched rocket manually. An autopilot would be essential for the guidance of the Natter rocket interceptor up to its operational altitude. No further human vertical rocket flights took place until 1961 when Major Yuri Gagarin was launched into orbit. In early April 1945 a fully operational Natter flew successfully into the lower stratosphere under the control of a three-axis autopilot and crewed with a dummy pilot. Both dummy pilot and rear fuselage were recovered successfully under separate parachutes. In less than a year the engineers and scientists in collaboration with aviation physicians and physiologists at research institutions across Germany had laid down the basic principles which still apply to human rocket flight today.

Open Access

VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM

Published Online: 29 Jan 2021
Page range: 1 - 6

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the condition in which blood clots form within the venous circulatory system, and consist of DVT (deep vein thrombosis) and PEs (Pulmonary emboli).

It is a common condition, with an estimated life-time risk of 8% and an annual incidence of 0.84-1 per 1000 population1, 2 and represents a significant economic burden: within Australia the annual estimated cost in 2018 being $1.72 billion AUD3.

The condition is considered aeromedically significant for both aircrew and passengers; diagnosis and treatment may have implications on an aviators medical certificate and the general public are often concerned about developing “economy class syndrome”.

This paper reviews the pathophysiology of VTE, the relationship between VTE and its treatment in the aviation environment. It also reviews some of the international aeromedical regulatory guidelines and provides a suggested approach to certification in case of VTE.

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