1. bookVolumen 29 (2022): Edición 2 (June 2022)
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Formato
Revista
eISSN
2082-8799
Primera edición
16 May 2011
Calendario de la edición
4 veces al año
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access type Acceso abierto

Children’s Motor Learning and Working Memory: The Role of Visual and Verbal Analogy Learning

Publicado en línea: 27 Jun 2022
Volumen & Edición: Volumen 29 (2022) - Edición 2 (June 2022)
Páginas: 3 - 10
Recibido: 26 Sep 2021
Aceptado: 08 Mar 2022
Detalles de la revista
License
Formato
Revista
eISSN
2082-8799
Primera edición
16 May 2011
Calendario de la edición
4 veces al año
Idiomas
Inglés
Abstract

Introduction. Physical education teachers and coaches often face the problem of how to convey information to novice learners, particularly to children. The present study aims to examine how visual and verbal analogy learning affects basketball free-throw learning as well as working memory in 9- to 12-year-old children.

Material and Methods. Forty-eight children (24 males, mean age: 10.5 ± 1.8 years) were selected through convenience sampling and randomly assigned to four groups, namely visual analogy, verbal analogy, explicit, and control groups. The task involved throwing a basketball from a distance of 3.05 meters. The participants completed 15 trials in the pretest, posttest, and retention phases and 720 trials in the acquisition phase.

Results. The result of the paired sample t-test indicated that the visual analogy, verbal analogy, and explicit learning groups experienced a significant improvement in their performance through the skill acquisition phase as well as an improvement in their working memories (p ≤ 0.05), while the control group did not exhibit such improvements (p = 0.91). In addition, one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that the analogy learning group outperformed other groups in both post-test and retention tests as well as in terms of motor learning and working memory (p ≤ 0.05).

Conclusions. The verbal analogy and the explicit learning groups were equally better than the control group. The findings of this study suggest that coaches in instructional environments should make further use of the advantages of visual analogy learning for children.

Keywords

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