1. bookVolume 64 (2020): Issue 4 (December 2020)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2453-7837
First Published
30 Mar 2016
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Molecular Detection and Identification of Piroplasms in Semi-Intensively Managed Cattle from Abeokuta, Nigeria

Published Online: 21 Dec 2020
Volume & Issue: Volume 64 (2020) - Issue 4 (December 2020)
Page range: 1 - 8
Received: 06 Jul 2020
Accepted: 10 Sep 2020
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2453-7837
First Published
30 Mar 2016
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Piroplasmosis is a tick-borne haemolytic disease caused by different species of the Babesia and Theileria genera. Data on the prevalence of bovine piroplasms and their genetic diversity are scanty in Nigeria. Hence, this study reported the detection of some piroplasms in the blood of cattle in Abeokuta, Nigeria by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Blood samples were collected from 252 cattle and subjected to DNA extraction followed by PCR amplification of the partial region of 18S rRNA of the haemoprotozoans. Selected positive amplicons were unidirectionally sequenced and compared to the reference sequences from the Genbank. A total of 220 (87.3 %) cattle were positive for Theileria velifera and/or Babesia bigemina. The T. velifera was detected only in 163 (64.7 %) cattle, while 7 (2.8 %) cattle had a single infection with B. bigemina. Fifty cattle (19.8 %) had mixed infections with both parasites. There were no significant differences in piroplasm infections between the ages of cattle for both parasites. There were no significant differences in infection rates between the sexes for T. velifera, while the males had a significantly higher (P < 0.05) rate of infection for B. bigemina than the female cattle. The molecular detection of Babesia and Theileria species of cattle are reported for the first time in cattle in Abeokuta, Nigeria. This study, which confirmed the endemic nature of the parasites in cattle in the study area, stresses their importance in livestock health and production in Nigeria.

Keywords

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