1. bookVolume 64 (2020): Issue 3 (September 2020)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2453-7837
First Published
30 Mar 2016
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Detection of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in Laughing Doves and the Risk of Spread to Backyard Poultry

Published Online: 06 Oct 2020
Volume & Issue: Volume 64 (2020) - Issue 3 (September 2020)
Page range: 1 - 12
Received: 16 Mar 2020
Accepted: 29 May 2020
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2453-7837
First Published
30 Mar 2016
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Newcastle disease (ND) is a highly infectious viral disease of birds caused by the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and doves have been incriminated in previous outbreaks of the disease that have discouraged backyard poultry productions. This survey was done to detect and characterize the NDV from 184 swabs from the cloacae and pharynxes of 67 trapped laughing doves and 25 backyard poultry birds. The study utilized haemagglutination assay (HA) followed by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests on HA positive samples to screen field samples. Conventional reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was conducted on the HI positives to characterize the NDV. This study revealed that of 134 dove samples screened, 88 (65.7 %) were HA positive. Of these HA positives subjected to HI testing, 37 (42.1 %) were HI positive. Interestingly, 21 (56.8 %) of the HI positives were also RT-PCR positive: 8 lentogenic, 12 velogenic, while one had both lentogenic and velogenic NDV. Comparatively, of the 50 chicken samples screened, 23 (46 %) were HA positive; and of these, HA positives subjected to HI testing, 16 (69.6 %) were HI positive. Only 4 (25 %) of the HI positives were RTPCR positive: 3 lentogenic and a velogenic NDV. From this study it was concluded that laughing doves were demonstrated to be infected with either lentogenic or velogenic NDV or both. The use of red blood adsorption-de-adsorption concentration of NDV enhanced the RT-PCR detection using the fusion gene primers NDV-F 4829 and NDV-R 5031. The detection of not only lentogenic but velogenic NDV in laughing doves poses a great risk to backyard poultry production.

Keywords

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