1. bookVolume 5 (2018): Issue 2 (December 2018)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2354-0036
First Published
16 Apr 2015
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Open Access

Creative Genius as Inherently Relevant and Beneficial: The View from Mount Olympus

Published Online: 03 Jan 2019
Volume & Issue: Volume 5 (2018) - Issue 2 (December 2018)
Page range: 138 - 141
Received: 15 Nov 2018
Accepted: 20 Dec 2018
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2354-0036
First Published
16 Apr 2015
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The author responds to Kaufman’s (2018) target essay from a unique perspective – research on creative genius. Although the author began studying little-c creativity, he switched to Big-C creativity when he did his doctoral dissertation, and continued that work for the rest of his career. One implication of such research is that the relevance of creative genius cannot be questioned, even if its benefits are sometimes ambiguous (however obviously consequential). Another implication is that creative geniuses do not require training in creativity, whatever usefulness such instruction may possess for everyday creativity.

Keywords

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