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Dettagli della rivista
Formato
Rivista
eISSN
1875-855X
Pubblicato per la prima volta
01 Jun 2007
Periodo di pubblicazione
6 volte all'anno
Lingue
Inglese

Cerca

Volume 13 (2019): Edizione 2 (April 2019)

Dettagli della rivista
Formato
Rivista
eISSN
1875-855X
Pubblicato per la prima volta
01 Jun 2007
Periodo di pubblicazione
6 volte all'anno
Lingue
Inglese

Cerca

6 Articoli

Editorial

Accesso libero

Chronic abdominal pain in children: the importance of endoscopy

Pubblicato online: 19 Dec 2019
Pagine: 37 - 38

Astratto

Original article

Accesso libero

Changes in protein patterns of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by silver nanoparticles capped with poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) polymer

Pubblicato online: 19 Dec 2019
Pagine: 39 - 47

Astratto

AbstractBackground

While silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly attractive as an antibacterial agent in many applications, the effect of AgNPs on bacterial protein profiles, especially AgNPs stabilized by polymeric molecules, is not well understood.

Objectives

To investigate the changes in bacterial protein patterns by AgNPs capped with poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) (AgNPs-PSSMA) polymer toward Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922.

Methods

The growth of bacteria after incubated with AgNPs-PSSMA for different time intervals was determined by optical density at 600 nm. Their protein patterns were observed using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and the proteomic analysis of extracted proteins was determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS).

Results

AgNPs-PSSMA was able to inhibit the growth of both S. aureus and E. coli cells. The treated bacterial cells expressed more proteins than the untreated cells as seen from SDS-PAGE study. Nanosilver (NS) caused the upregulation of metabolic gene, waaA, in S. aureus cells. For E. coli cells, the upregulated proteins were metabolic genes (srlB, fliE, murD) and other genes dealt with DNA replication (dinG), DNA–RNA transcription (yrdD), RNA– protein translation (rplD), molecular transport (sapF), and signal transduction (tdcF).

Conclusions

The antibacterial effect of AgNPs-PSSMA may arise by changing the bacterial proteins and thus interfering with the normal cell function.

Parole chiave

  • nanoparticles
  • nanomedicine
  • proteomics
  • Staphylococcus aureus
Accesso libero

Epidemiological study of congenital and hereditary anomalies in Sialkot District of Pakistan revealed a high incidence of limb and neurological disorders

Pubblicato online: 19 Dec 2019
Pagine: 49 - 60

Astratto

AbstractBackground

Pakistan faces high incidence of congenital anomalies (CA) and hereditary anomalies due to various factors, including a high rate of consanguinity, early marriages, and predominance of extended families. There is a paucity of epidemiological studies that could provide a baseline for management strategies for these anomalies.

Objectives

We aimed to elucidate the pattern, as well as the clinical and genetic aspects, of CA prevalence among the general population in Sialkot District of Pakistan.

Methods

In a cross-sectional sampling design, subjects and families with a certain type of CA were recruited from hospitals and medical centers in Sialkot District. Subjects were also selected from various towns and remote villages by visiting public places. Phenotypic and descriptive data were obtained, pedigrees were constructed, and parental and demographic attributes were recorded.

Results

A total of 241 independent subjects and/or families with CA were recruited. The malformations were classified into five major and 56 minor categories. Limb defects had the highest representation (n = 113; proportion = 0.469; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.406–0.532), followed by neurological anomalies (n = 76; proportion = 0.315; 95% CI = 0.257–0.374). Among the limb defects, polydactyly and talipes were most prevalent while, among neurological disorders, intellectual disability and cerebral palsy were more frequent. In this cohort, sporadic occurrence was customary compared to the familial presentation (n = 144 vs 97). Analyses of various attributes, such as gender differences, parental consanguinity, and paternal ages, as well as pedigree analyses, revealed marked heterogeneity among the major and minor categories of CA.

Conclusion

The pattern of anomalies witnessed in this cohort and a high occurrence of sporadic cases point to a substantial role of nongenetic etiological factors, which could be minimized by strengthening the health-care system.

Parole chiave

  • consanguinity
  • genetic diseases
  • prevalence
Accesso libero

Time to blood cultures positivity of microorganisms using a continuous-monitoring automated blood cultures system

Pubblicato online: 19 Dec 2019
Pagine: 61 - 69

Astratto

AbstractBackground

Previous studies showed that clinically significant pathogens were detected within 3 days of incubation using a continuous monitoring automated blood culture instrument.

Objectives

To determine time to blood culture positivity (TTP) of microorganisms using a BD BACTEC™ FX.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, Thailand from October to November 2014.

Results

One-hundred and eighty-one patients with 195 episodes of infection and 436 cultures were included in the analysis. Among 181 patients, 55.2% were male and the median age was 61 years (interquartile range (IQR) 50, 76). Of the 195 episodes of infections, the most common source was genitourinary tract (15.4%). Overall, the median TTP was 17 hours (IQR 11.5, 24.5), the shortest TTP was observed in Streptococcus agalactiae. Four-hundred and seventy-eight cultures (97.6%) and all (100%) were detected at 3 days and 5 days of incubation. Factors associated with TTP ≤24 hour were blood drawn from patients who had hematologic malignancy (odds ratio (OR) 9.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2, 74.3, P = 0.030), endocarditis and vascular infection (OR 8.7, 95% CI 1.1, 67.2, P = 0.038), thrombocytopenia (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3, 4.4, P = 0.004), clinical of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2, 4.5, P = 0.014), and not receiving antimicrobials within 72 hours before cultures taken (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4, 3.6, P < 0.001).

Conclusions

TTP varied depends upon the pathogens and clinical settings. However, bacteria were isolated from almost, but not all of the blood cultures within 3 days of incubation.

Parole chiave

  • bacteremia
  • blood culture
  • fungemia
Accesso libero

Patient and injury characteristics associated with road traffic mortality in general hospitals in southern Thailand

Pubblicato online: 19 Dec 2019
Pagine: 71 - 77

Astratto

AbstractBackground

Road traffic injuries are a major public health burden in developing countries. Thailand has the highest fatality rate from road traffic injuries in southeast Asia so that prevention of unintentional injuries is important.

Objective

To identify patient and injury characteristics associated with road traffic mortality in the southern provinces of Thailand.

Methods

Data on a total of 78,862 road traffic injuries recorded by the general hospitals in 5 southern provinces of Thailand, during 2008–2013, were obtained from the Office of Disease Prevention and Control. Chi-squared test was used to determine the association between patient/injury characteristics and road traffic mortality, and logistic regression was used to identify the strength of associations.

Results

In this study, road traffic mortality was found to be 1.8% of all injuries. Most of the deaths occurred in males (61.7%), who were aged 25–44 years (35.8%), being drivers (68.6%), using motorcycle (78.4%), and not wearing a helmet (61.0%). Road traffic mortality was higher among males, older age people, those who were not wearing a helmet or not fastening a seat belt, pedestrians and when people crashed with or by motor car, with wound being penetrating or blunt with penetrating, and when they were having head or neck, chest, or abdominal or pelvic cavity injuries.

Conclusion

Policies and measures for reducing road traffic mortality should focus on males and older aged persons, use of safety devices, and occurrence of multiple injuries.

Parole chiave

  • accidents
  • traffic
  • mortality
  • wounds and injuries

Brief communication (original)

Accesso libero

Endoscopic finding and treatment outcome of children with Helicobacter pylori infection in lower northern Thailand

Pubblicato online: 19 Dec 2019
Pagine: 79 - 82

Astratto

AbstractBackground

Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the predisposing factors for gastritis, peptic ulcer, and duodenal ulcer. Definite diagnosis of H. pylori infection is important in planning effective medical management. However, confirming the diagnosis through bacterial culture takes a number of days, and thus delays treatment.

Objectives

To examine endoscopic findings in children associated with chronic abdominal pain and H. pylori infection to aid in early diagnosis. We also evaluated treatment outcome of H. pylori infection.

Methods

A retrospective study was performed by reviewing the medical records of children under 15 years of age with chronic abdominal pain who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) between 2011 and 2017. According to 2016 Joint ESPGHAN/NASPGHAN Guidelines, H. pylori infection was defined by positive tests for both histopathology test and rapid urease test (RUT). The EGD finding, RUT, histopathologic finding, and treatment outcome were recorded.

Results

Forty-eight children presented with chronic abdominal pain (male 47.9%, female 52.1%, mean age was 8.44 ± 2.97 years). Twelve children out of 48 had H. pylori infection (12/48, 25%). Eight among the 12 children had antral nodularity (8/12), wherein there was no antral nodularity in children without H. pylori infection (0/36). This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of antral nodularity finding for H. pylori infection were 66.7% and 100%, respectively. Eradication of H. pylori infection with standard regimen improved the abdominal pain within 4 weeks.

Conclusion

The occurrence of antral nodularity in endoscopic finding was significantly associated with H. pylori infection. In addition, antral nodularity finding showed a good sensitivity and high specificity for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection.

Parole chiave

  • antral nodularity
  • chronic abdominal pain
  • esophagogastroduodenoscopy
  • rapid urease test
6 Articoli

Editorial

Accesso libero

Chronic abdominal pain in children: the importance of endoscopy

Pubblicato online: 19 Dec 2019
Pagine: 37 - 38

Astratto

Original article

Accesso libero

Changes in protein patterns of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by silver nanoparticles capped with poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) polymer

Pubblicato online: 19 Dec 2019
Pagine: 39 - 47

Astratto

AbstractBackground

While silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly attractive as an antibacterial agent in many applications, the effect of AgNPs on bacterial protein profiles, especially AgNPs stabilized by polymeric molecules, is not well understood.

Objectives

To investigate the changes in bacterial protein patterns by AgNPs capped with poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) (AgNPs-PSSMA) polymer toward Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922.

Methods

The growth of bacteria after incubated with AgNPs-PSSMA for different time intervals was determined by optical density at 600 nm. Their protein patterns were observed using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and the proteomic analysis of extracted proteins was determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS).

Results

AgNPs-PSSMA was able to inhibit the growth of both S. aureus and E. coli cells. The treated bacterial cells expressed more proteins than the untreated cells as seen from SDS-PAGE study. Nanosilver (NS) caused the upregulation of metabolic gene, waaA, in S. aureus cells. For E. coli cells, the upregulated proteins were metabolic genes (srlB, fliE, murD) and other genes dealt with DNA replication (dinG), DNA–RNA transcription (yrdD), RNA– protein translation (rplD), molecular transport (sapF), and signal transduction (tdcF).

Conclusions

The antibacterial effect of AgNPs-PSSMA may arise by changing the bacterial proteins and thus interfering with the normal cell function.

Parole chiave

  • nanoparticles
  • nanomedicine
  • proteomics
  • Staphylococcus aureus
Accesso libero

Epidemiological study of congenital and hereditary anomalies in Sialkot District of Pakistan revealed a high incidence of limb and neurological disorders

Pubblicato online: 19 Dec 2019
Pagine: 49 - 60

Astratto

AbstractBackground

Pakistan faces high incidence of congenital anomalies (CA) and hereditary anomalies due to various factors, including a high rate of consanguinity, early marriages, and predominance of extended families. There is a paucity of epidemiological studies that could provide a baseline for management strategies for these anomalies.

Objectives

We aimed to elucidate the pattern, as well as the clinical and genetic aspects, of CA prevalence among the general population in Sialkot District of Pakistan.

Methods

In a cross-sectional sampling design, subjects and families with a certain type of CA were recruited from hospitals and medical centers in Sialkot District. Subjects were also selected from various towns and remote villages by visiting public places. Phenotypic and descriptive data were obtained, pedigrees were constructed, and parental and demographic attributes were recorded.

Results

A total of 241 independent subjects and/or families with CA were recruited. The malformations were classified into five major and 56 minor categories. Limb defects had the highest representation (n = 113; proportion = 0.469; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.406–0.532), followed by neurological anomalies (n = 76; proportion = 0.315; 95% CI = 0.257–0.374). Among the limb defects, polydactyly and talipes were most prevalent while, among neurological disorders, intellectual disability and cerebral palsy were more frequent. In this cohort, sporadic occurrence was customary compared to the familial presentation (n = 144 vs 97). Analyses of various attributes, such as gender differences, parental consanguinity, and paternal ages, as well as pedigree analyses, revealed marked heterogeneity among the major and minor categories of CA.

Conclusion

The pattern of anomalies witnessed in this cohort and a high occurrence of sporadic cases point to a substantial role of nongenetic etiological factors, which could be minimized by strengthening the health-care system.

Parole chiave

  • consanguinity
  • genetic diseases
  • prevalence
Accesso libero

Time to blood cultures positivity of microorganisms using a continuous-monitoring automated blood cultures system

Pubblicato online: 19 Dec 2019
Pagine: 61 - 69

Astratto

AbstractBackground

Previous studies showed that clinically significant pathogens were detected within 3 days of incubation using a continuous monitoring automated blood culture instrument.

Objectives

To determine time to blood culture positivity (TTP) of microorganisms using a BD BACTEC™ FX.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, Thailand from October to November 2014.

Results

One-hundred and eighty-one patients with 195 episodes of infection and 436 cultures were included in the analysis. Among 181 patients, 55.2% were male and the median age was 61 years (interquartile range (IQR) 50, 76). Of the 195 episodes of infections, the most common source was genitourinary tract (15.4%). Overall, the median TTP was 17 hours (IQR 11.5, 24.5), the shortest TTP was observed in Streptococcus agalactiae. Four-hundred and seventy-eight cultures (97.6%) and all (100%) were detected at 3 days and 5 days of incubation. Factors associated with TTP ≤24 hour were blood drawn from patients who had hematologic malignancy (odds ratio (OR) 9.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2, 74.3, P = 0.030), endocarditis and vascular infection (OR 8.7, 95% CI 1.1, 67.2, P = 0.038), thrombocytopenia (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3, 4.4, P = 0.004), clinical of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2, 4.5, P = 0.014), and not receiving antimicrobials within 72 hours before cultures taken (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4, 3.6, P < 0.001).

Conclusions

TTP varied depends upon the pathogens and clinical settings. However, bacteria were isolated from almost, but not all of the blood cultures within 3 days of incubation.

Parole chiave

  • bacteremia
  • blood culture
  • fungemia
Accesso libero

Patient and injury characteristics associated with road traffic mortality in general hospitals in southern Thailand

Pubblicato online: 19 Dec 2019
Pagine: 71 - 77

Astratto

AbstractBackground

Road traffic injuries are a major public health burden in developing countries. Thailand has the highest fatality rate from road traffic injuries in southeast Asia so that prevention of unintentional injuries is important.

Objective

To identify patient and injury characteristics associated with road traffic mortality in the southern provinces of Thailand.

Methods

Data on a total of 78,862 road traffic injuries recorded by the general hospitals in 5 southern provinces of Thailand, during 2008–2013, were obtained from the Office of Disease Prevention and Control. Chi-squared test was used to determine the association between patient/injury characteristics and road traffic mortality, and logistic regression was used to identify the strength of associations.

Results

In this study, road traffic mortality was found to be 1.8% of all injuries. Most of the deaths occurred in males (61.7%), who were aged 25–44 years (35.8%), being drivers (68.6%), using motorcycle (78.4%), and not wearing a helmet (61.0%). Road traffic mortality was higher among males, older age people, those who were not wearing a helmet or not fastening a seat belt, pedestrians and when people crashed with or by motor car, with wound being penetrating or blunt with penetrating, and when they were having head or neck, chest, or abdominal or pelvic cavity injuries.

Conclusion

Policies and measures for reducing road traffic mortality should focus on males and older aged persons, use of safety devices, and occurrence of multiple injuries.

Parole chiave

  • accidents
  • traffic
  • mortality
  • wounds and injuries

Brief communication (original)

Accesso libero

Endoscopic finding and treatment outcome of children with Helicobacter pylori infection in lower northern Thailand

Pubblicato online: 19 Dec 2019
Pagine: 79 - 82

Astratto

AbstractBackground

Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the predisposing factors for gastritis, peptic ulcer, and duodenal ulcer. Definite diagnosis of H. pylori infection is important in planning effective medical management. However, confirming the diagnosis through bacterial culture takes a number of days, and thus delays treatment.

Objectives

To examine endoscopic findings in children associated with chronic abdominal pain and H. pylori infection to aid in early diagnosis. We also evaluated treatment outcome of H. pylori infection.

Methods

A retrospective study was performed by reviewing the medical records of children under 15 years of age with chronic abdominal pain who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) between 2011 and 2017. According to 2016 Joint ESPGHAN/NASPGHAN Guidelines, H. pylori infection was defined by positive tests for both histopathology test and rapid urease test (RUT). The EGD finding, RUT, histopathologic finding, and treatment outcome were recorded.

Results

Forty-eight children presented with chronic abdominal pain (male 47.9%, female 52.1%, mean age was 8.44 ± 2.97 years). Twelve children out of 48 had H. pylori infection (12/48, 25%). Eight among the 12 children had antral nodularity (8/12), wherein there was no antral nodularity in children without H. pylori infection (0/36). This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of antral nodularity finding for H. pylori infection were 66.7% and 100%, respectively. Eradication of H. pylori infection with standard regimen improved the abdominal pain within 4 weeks.

Conclusion

The occurrence of antral nodularity in endoscopic finding was significantly associated with H. pylori infection. In addition, antral nodularity finding showed a good sensitivity and high specificity for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection.

Parole chiave

  • antral nodularity
  • chronic abdominal pain
  • esophagogastroduodenoscopy
  • rapid urease test

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