Journal & Issues

Volume 28 (2022): Issue 2 (August 2022)

Volume 28 (2022): Issue 1 (April 2022)

Volume 27 (2021): Issue 3 (December 2021)

Volume 27 (2021): Issue 2 (August 2021)

Volume 27 (2021): Issue 1 (April 2021)

Volume 26 (2020): Issue 3 (December 2020)

Volume 26 (2020): Issue 2 (August 2020)

Volume 26 (2020): Issue 1 (April 2020)

Volume 25 (2019): Issue 3 (December 2019)

Volume 25 (2019): Issue 2 (August 2019)

Volume 25 (2019): Issue 1 (April 2019)

Volume 24 (2018): Issue 3 (December 2018)

Volume 24 (2018): Issue 2 (August 2018)

Volume 24 (2018): Issue 1 (March 2018)

Volume 23 (2017): Issue 3 (December 2017)

Volume 23 (2017): Issue 2 (June 2017)

Volume 23 (2017): Issue 1 (March 2017)

Volume 22 (2016): Issue 3 (September 2016)

Volume 22 (2016): Issue 2 (June 2016)

Volume 22 (2016): Issue 1 (March 2016)

Volume 21 (2015): Issue 4 (December 2015)

Volume 21 (2015): Issue 3 (September 2015)

Volume 21 (2015): Issue 2 (June 2015)

Volume 21 (2015): Issue 1 (March 2015)

Volume 20 (2014): Issue 4 (December 2014)

Volume 20 (2014): Issue 3 (September 2014)

Volume 20 (2014): Issue 2 (June 2014)

Volume 20 (2014): Issue 1 (March 2014)

Volume 19 (2013): Issue 4 (December 2013)

Volume 19 (2013): Issue 3 (September 2013)

Volume 19 (2013): Issue 1-2 (May 2013)
Heavy-mineral analysis as a tool in earth-scientific research

Volume 18 (2012): Issue 4 (December 2012)

Volume 18 (2012): Issue 3 (October 2012)

Volume 18 (2012): Issue 2 (August 2012)

Volume 18 (2012): Issue 1 (March 2012)

Volume 17 (2011): Issue 4 (December 2011)

Volume 17 (2011): Issue 3 (September 2011)

Volume 17 (2011): Issue 2 (June 2011)

Volume 17 (2011): Issue 1 (April 2011)

Volume 16 (2010): Issue 4 (December 2010)

Volume 16 (2010): Issue 3 (October 2010)

Volume 16 (2010): Issue 2 (June 2010)

Volume 16 (2010): Issue 1 (April 2010)

Volume 15 (2009): Issue 3-4 (December 2009)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2080-6574
ISSN
1426-8981
First Published
24 Dec 2009
Publication timeframe
3 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 16 (2010): Issue 2 (June 2010)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2080-6574
ISSN
1426-8981
First Published
24 Dec 2009
Publication timeframe
3 times per year
Languages
English

Search

2 Articles
Open Access

Unusual development of sandur sedimentary succession, an example from the Pleistocene of S Poland

Published Online: 14 Jul 2010
Page range: 83 - 99

Abstract

Unusual development of sandur sedimentary succession, an example from the Pleistocene of S Poland

An atypical lithological development of outwash deposits in the Carpathians Foreland (S Poland) shows lower and middle parts of the sedimentary succession that are characterized by sinuous palaeochannels. This channel facies consists of laterally accreted sands derived from side bars. The sedimentary environment was a proglacial system of anabranching channels, presumably of anastomosed type. The outwash channel pattern was most probably controlled by the raising base level of the fluvial system. Both proglacial and extraglacial waters were dammed by a sandur within a small upland valley. Aggradation and progradation of the glaciofluvial deposits resulted in progressive rising of the dammed lake level. The low hydraulic gradient of the outwash streams resulted in a sinuous planform as well as a low-energy style of deposition. Afterwards, the rising lake water was drained off through a low watershed and the entire valley became filled with outwash sediments. The bedrock morphology thus became buried and a typical unconfined sandur with a braided channel network developed during the last phase of the glaciomarginal sedimentation (upper part of the sedimentary succession under study).

Keywords

  • outwash deposits
  • sedimentology
  • Pleistocene
  • Poland
Open Access

Sedimentation style of a Pleistocene kame terrace from the Western Sudety Mountains, S Poland

Published Online: 14 Jul 2010
Page range: 101 - 110

Abstract

Sedimentation style of a Pleistocene kame terrace from the Western Sudety Mountains, S Poland

The depositional conditions of kame terraces in a mountain valley were analysed sedimentologically and petrologically through a series of kame terraces in the Rudawy Janowickie mountains. The kame terraces comprise five lithofacies associations. Lithofacies association GRt, Sp originates from deposition in the high-energy, deep gravel-bed channel of a braided river. Lithofacies association GC represents a washed out glacial till. Probably a thin layer of till was washed out by sandy braided rivers (Sp). The fourth association (Fh, Fm) indicates a shallow and quite small glaciomarginal lake. The last association (GRt, GRp) indicates the return of deposition in a sandy-bed braided channel. The petrography of the Janowice Wiekie pit and measurements of cross-stratified beds indicate a palaeocurrent direction from N to S. The Janowice Wielkie sedimentary succession accumulated most probably during the Saalian (Odranian, Saale I, Drenthe) as the first phase of ice-sheet melting, because the kame terrace under study is the highest one, 25-27 m above the Bóbr river level. The deposits under study are dominated by local components. The proglacial streams flowed along the margin of the ice sheet and deposited the kame terrace. The majority of the sedimentary succession was deposited in a confined braided-river system in quite deep channels.

Keywords

  • kame terrace
  • confined braided rivers
  • lithofacies analysis
  • sediment-petrographical analysis
  • Pleistocene
  • Sudety Mountains
2 Articles
Open Access

Unusual development of sandur sedimentary succession, an example from the Pleistocene of S Poland

Published Online: 14 Jul 2010
Page range: 83 - 99

Abstract

Unusual development of sandur sedimentary succession, an example from the Pleistocene of S Poland

An atypical lithological development of outwash deposits in the Carpathians Foreland (S Poland) shows lower and middle parts of the sedimentary succession that are characterized by sinuous palaeochannels. This channel facies consists of laterally accreted sands derived from side bars. The sedimentary environment was a proglacial system of anabranching channels, presumably of anastomosed type. The outwash channel pattern was most probably controlled by the raising base level of the fluvial system. Both proglacial and extraglacial waters were dammed by a sandur within a small upland valley. Aggradation and progradation of the glaciofluvial deposits resulted in progressive rising of the dammed lake level. The low hydraulic gradient of the outwash streams resulted in a sinuous planform as well as a low-energy style of deposition. Afterwards, the rising lake water was drained off through a low watershed and the entire valley became filled with outwash sediments. The bedrock morphology thus became buried and a typical unconfined sandur with a braided channel network developed during the last phase of the glaciomarginal sedimentation (upper part of the sedimentary succession under study).

Keywords

  • outwash deposits
  • sedimentology
  • Pleistocene
  • Poland
Open Access

Sedimentation style of a Pleistocene kame terrace from the Western Sudety Mountains, S Poland

Published Online: 14 Jul 2010
Page range: 101 - 110

Abstract

Sedimentation style of a Pleistocene kame terrace from the Western Sudety Mountains, S Poland

The depositional conditions of kame terraces in a mountain valley were analysed sedimentologically and petrologically through a series of kame terraces in the Rudawy Janowickie mountains. The kame terraces comprise five lithofacies associations. Lithofacies association GRt, Sp originates from deposition in the high-energy, deep gravel-bed channel of a braided river. Lithofacies association GC represents a washed out glacial till. Probably a thin layer of till was washed out by sandy braided rivers (Sp). The fourth association (Fh, Fm) indicates a shallow and quite small glaciomarginal lake. The last association (GRt, GRp) indicates the return of deposition in a sandy-bed braided channel. The petrography of the Janowice Wiekie pit and measurements of cross-stratified beds indicate a palaeocurrent direction from N to S. The Janowice Wielkie sedimentary succession accumulated most probably during the Saalian (Odranian, Saale I, Drenthe) as the first phase of ice-sheet melting, because the kame terrace under study is the highest one, 25-27 m above the Bóbr river level. The deposits under study are dominated by local components. The proglacial streams flowed along the margin of the ice sheet and deposited the kame terrace. The majority of the sedimentary succession was deposited in a confined braided-river system in quite deep channels.

Keywords

  • kame terrace
  • confined braided rivers
  • lithofacies analysis
  • sediment-petrographical analysis
  • Pleistocene
  • Sudety Mountains

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo