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Détails du magazine
Format
Magazine
eISSN
2001-5119
Première publication
01 Mar 2013
Période de publication
2 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

Chercher

Volume 36 (2015): Edition 1 (June 2015)

Détails du magazine
Format
Magazine
eISSN
2001-5119
Première publication
01 Mar 2013
Période de publication
2 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

Chercher

11 Articles
Accès libre

A Few Parting Words

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 3 - 4

Résumé

Accès libre

Approaches to Political Commentary in Scandinavia

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 5 - 18

Résumé

Abstract

Political commentary is a contested genre that has attracted a great deal of attention in the Scandinavian public debate, whereas the scholarly literature on it is still in an initial phase. In order to strengthen future research, the present paper suggests a two-dimensional matrix indexing the research on Scandinavian political commentary along the dimensions text/context and descriptive/evaluative. The matrix enables us to see more clearly what we already know and where we lack knowledge. It enables us to see how each category can be developed, the interplay among them, and the obvious lack of textual, evaluative approaches. The author argues that a joint, cross-disciplinary engagement is necessary if we are to adequately understand the potentials and problems of political commentary.

Mots clés

  • political commentary
  • pundits
  • political journalism
  • evaluative research
  • rhetoric
  • cross-disciplinary
Accès libre

“They Say One Thing and Mean Another” How Differences in In-Group Understandings of Key Goals Shape Political Knowledge

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 19 - 34

Résumé

Abstract

Journalists and politicians play different roles in the functional structure of the Habermasian public sphere; as such, they might be expected to have different understandings of what knowledge production and transmission might mean. This difference of understanding is more than a conflict over definitions; it is an epistemic divergence à la Fuller (2002:220), where already defined groups hold divergent understandings of what constitutes understanding. While a substantial body of work has been based on the idea of epistemic communities in the context of science and expert organizations in general, little empirical research exists to demonstrate the validity and adaptability of the concept of epistemic communities in comparative political communication research. Here, we show the cross-national validity of the concept of epistemic communities in the context of professional groups of politicians and political journalists in Austria, Finland, France, Denmark, Germany, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

Mots clés

  • group epistemology
  • epistemic community
  • political communication
  • social psychology of knowledge
  • public sphere
  • Habermas
  • confirmatory factor analysis.
Accès libre

Worldview Struggles under a New Climate Regime

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 35 - 49

Résumé

Abstract

The UN summit on climate change in Durban constituted an important moment in the continuous discourse on how to understand climate change and the framing of the problems and solutions. A new emergent frame of understanding could be detected in the press, which the author calls the ‘out-dated worldview’ frame. This frame contains a critique of the clear-cut division between developing vs. developed countries from the 1992 Rio Convention, and may influence how we understand burden-sharing roles in a new global climate deal. In an eager attempt to include all major polluters within a new climate regime, there is a danger that the principle of ‘common but differentiated responsibility’ will be ignored, which may be an attempt to excuse the rich industrialized countries from their responsibility after 150 years of benefitting from fossil-fuel-driven development.

Mots clés

  • climate deal
  • climate negotiations
  • COP17
  • Kyoto Protocol
  • climate framing
  • climate representations
Accès libre

Crisis Communication and the Norwegian Authorities

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 51 - 64

Résumé

Abstract

The present article examines how crisis communication after catastrophes can strengthen society or undermine trust, credibility and confidence between the authorities and the general public. The two cases examined are the Norwegian authorities’ communicative response to the Chernobyl power plant disaster on 26 April, 1986, and the terrorist attacks on the government complex in Oslo and the Labour Party youth camp on the island of Utøya on 22 July, 2011. The analysis compares the initial phase of crisis communication. A serious communication crisis arose between the authorities and the public after Chernobyl, while communication during the early days after 22 July was successful. The difference is explained by the concept of rationality; crisis communication after Chernobyl was based on technical rationality, whereas communication after the terror attacks was grounded on the rationality of caring. The theoretical framework originates from Heidegger’s existential phenomenology with special focus on the existentiales Being-in-the-World, State of Mind and Care.

Mots clés

  • crisis communication
  • Heidegger
  • existential phenomenology
  • ontological security
  • instrumental rationality
  • rationality of caring
Accès libre

The Moral Police

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 65 - 78

Résumé

Abstract

How does the general public understand media coverage of immigration issues? The present article analyses the media effects of an extensive news series focusing on the harassment of people believed to disrespect traditional Muslim norms. Through an explorative survey study, it traces how Norwegian media launched and covered what was labeled “the moral police” phenomenon, and to what extent the media framing of the issue had an agendasetting and/or frame-setting effect on the public. It finds that, although most respondents had become aware of the issue through the media, they did not necessarily adopt the media’s framing of the phenomenon. The respondents did not primarily relate the “moral police” to immigration (the dominant media frame), they understood the new phenomenon through experiences from their own lives and framed it as a general social problem.

Mots clés

  • immigration
  • public opinion
  • framing
  • agenda-setting
  • media influence
Accès libre

Young People’s Narratives of Media and Identity

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 79 - 93

Résumé

Abstract

The article explores how upper secondary students use the learning activity mediagraphy to reflect on their identity and on media as constraining and enabling factors in their social practice. In mediagraphy, the students research four generations of their own families, including themselves. They write a mediagraphy essay on the differences and similarities across the generations in media use and turning points in individuals’ lives, in addition to societal and media-related developments. Data from student products and interviews are analysed through three “identity dilemmas” that any identity claim faces: the constant navigation between 1) continuity and change, 2) sameness and difference with regard to others, and 3) agency as “person-to-world” and “world-to-person”. The findings suggest that mediagraphy is a type of identity work that can potentially help students develop an agentive identity in a time of insecurity, with rapidly shifting social and cultural conditions and increasing media density.

Mots clés

  • mediagraphy
  • identity
  • agency
  • media use
  • media education
  • media literacy
Accès libre

Slow Television

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 95 - 108

Résumé

Abstract

Public-service broadcasters are compelled to seek innovative ways to fulfil their publicservice functions in an increasingly competitive environment. The Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK) has been experimenting with new programme formats and cross-media concepts. The concept of slow television was developed by the regional office in Bergen. On July 16, 2011, they started a five-day live broadcast from one of the cruise ships that sailed up the Norwegian coast from Bergen in southern Norway to Kirkenes near the Russian border. The broadcast was a huge success. I take this programme as a case study and provide an analysis from the perspective of innovation within public-service broadcasting. The article addresses the following questions: 1) In what way was the programme innovative? 2) How was the programme accepted and produced? 3) What accounts for the success of the broadcast in terms of number of viewers and popular engagement?

Mots clés

  • slow television
  • public service broadcasting
  • innovation
  • production
  • interactivity
  • Norway
Accès libre

Why Does the Archbishop Not Tweet?

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 109 - 123

Résumé

Abstract

In summer 2012, the Archbishop of the Church of Sweden appeared on Twitter. There was only one problem - it was not the Archbishop himself who was tweeting, but an anonymous person. A discussion then ensued on Twitter and in the blogosphere between those in favor of the Archbishop and his department and mainly social media proponents.

The present article describes and analyzes the social media debate, and how authority and hierarchies are negotiated in and through social media. The analysis is based on Heidi Campbell’s “Religious-Social Shaping of Technology” model, and emphasizes the need to take into account not only the faith and tradition of the religious actor, but also the societal context in which the negotiating process takes place. In this case, the concepts of “mediatization” and “secularization” are used to understand the broader context of the process.

Mots clés

  • authority
  • church
  • mediatization
  • religion
  • secularization
  • social media
Accès libre

The Complexity of Public Relations Work

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 125 - 139

Résumé

Abstract

Research on the PR-function is extensive, especially in the US and the UK. The managertechnician dichotomy is well known, but has been challenged by recent research where more nuanced perspectives on PR-managerial roles are displayed. In relation to this complexity of PR-managerial roles the article investigates the function and role Swedish public relations managers perform and play in their organizations. The Swedish case, with its high proportion of PR practitioners employed by public authorities, was used to further explore the complexity of PR work. The empirical data was a survey distributed to a random sample of members of the Swedish Public Relations Association, with a managerial or head/ director position, representing all industry/societal sectors. 261 persons completed the survey, giving a response rate of 30 percent. The study confirmed previous research of a more complex picture of the PR-managerial level. One important conclusion was therefore that the simple dichotomy between managers and technicians cannot be used to understand managerial level positions in the public relations context. This complexity was even further emphasized when comparing PR-mangers in the private and the public sector. One challenge pointed out for future research was to develop analyses of PR managerial roles in different types of organizations.

Mots clés

  • PR
  • PR managers roles
  • practitioners roles
  • information/communication managers
  • PR role research
Accès libre

New Literature (A selection from Nordicom’s database NCOM)

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 141 - 158

Résumé

11 Articles
Accès libre

A Few Parting Words

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 3 - 4

Résumé

Accès libre

Approaches to Political Commentary in Scandinavia

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 5 - 18

Résumé

Abstract

Political commentary is a contested genre that has attracted a great deal of attention in the Scandinavian public debate, whereas the scholarly literature on it is still in an initial phase. In order to strengthen future research, the present paper suggests a two-dimensional matrix indexing the research on Scandinavian political commentary along the dimensions text/context and descriptive/evaluative. The matrix enables us to see more clearly what we already know and where we lack knowledge. It enables us to see how each category can be developed, the interplay among them, and the obvious lack of textual, evaluative approaches. The author argues that a joint, cross-disciplinary engagement is necessary if we are to adequately understand the potentials and problems of political commentary.

Mots clés

  • political commentary
  • pundits
  • political journalism
  • evaluative research
  • rhetoric
  • cross-disciplinary
Accès libre

“They Say One Thing and Mean Another” How Differences in In-Group Understandings of Key Goals Shape Political Knowledge

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 19 - 34

Résumé

Abstract

Journalists and politicians play different roles in the functional structure of the Habermasian public sphere; as such, they might be expected to have different understandings of what knowledge production and transmission might mean. This difference of understanding is more than a conflict over definitions; it is an epistemic divergence à la Fuller (2002:220), where already defined groups hold divergent understandings of what constitutes understanding. While a substantial body of work has been based on the idea of epistemic communities in the context of science and expert organizations in general, little empirical research exists to demonstrate the validity and adaptability of the concept of epistemic communities in comparative political communication research. Here, we show the cross-national validity of the concept of epistemic communities in the context of professional groups of politicians and political journalists in Austria, Finland, France, Denmark, Germany, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

Mots clés

  • group epistemology
  • epistemic community
  • political communication
  • social psychology of knowledge
  • public sphere
  • Habermas
  • confirmatory factor analysis.
Accès libre

Worldview Struggles under a New Climate Regime

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 35 - 49

Résumé

Abstract

The UN summit on climate change in Durban constituted an important moment in the continuous discourse on how to understand climate change and the framing of the problems and solutions. A new emergent frame of understanding could be detected in the press, which the author calls the ‘out-dated worldview’ frame. This frame contains a critique of the clear-cut division between developing vs. developed countries from the 1992 Rio Convention, and may influence how we understand burden-sharing roles in a new global climate deal. In an eager attempt to include all major polluters within a new climate regime, there is a danger that the principle of ‘common but differentiated responsibility’ will be ignored, which may be an attempt to excuse the rich industrialized countries from their responsibility after 150 years of benefitting from fossil-fuel-driven development.

Mots clés

  • climate deal
  • climate negotiations
  • COP17
  • Kyoto Protocol
  • climate framing
  • climate representations
Accès libre

Crisis Communication and the Norwegian Authorities

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 51 - 64

Résumé

Abstract

The present article examines how crisis communication after catastrophes can strengthen society or undermine trust, credibility and confidence between the authorities and the general public. The two cases examined are the Norwegian authorities’ communicative response to the Chernobyl power plant disaster on 26 April, 1986, and the terrorist attacks on the government complex in Oslo and the Labour Party youth camp on the island of Utøya on 22 July, 2011. The analysis compares the initial phase of crisis communication. A serious communication crisis arose between the authorities and the public after Chernobyl, while communication during the early days after 22 July was successful. The difference is explained by the concept of rationality; crisis communication after Chernobyl was based on technical rationality, whereas communication after the terror attacks was grounded on the rationality of caring. The theoretical framework originates from Heidegger’s existential phenomenology with special focus on the existentiales Being-in-the-World, State of Mind and Care.

Mots clés

  • crisis communication
  • Heidegger
  • existential phenomenology
  • ontological security
  • instrumental rationality
  • rationality of caring
Accès libre

The Moral Police

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 65 - 78

Résumé

Abstract

How does the general public understand media coverage of immigration issues? The present article analyses the media effects of an extensive news series focusing on the harassment of people believed to disrespect traditional Muslim norms. Through an explorative survey study, it traces how Norwegian media launched and covered what was labeled “the moral police” phenomenon, and to what extent the media framing of the issue had an agendasetting and/or frame-setting effect on the public. It finds that, although most respondents had become aware of the issue through the media, they did not necessarily adopt the media’s framing of the phenomenon. The respondents did not primarily relate the “moral police” to immigration (the dominant media frame), they understood the new phenomenon through experiences from their own lives and framed it as a general social problem.

Mots clés

  • immigration
  • public opinion
  • framing
  • agenda-setting
  • media influence
Accès libre

Young People’s Narratives of Media and Identity

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 79 - 93

Résumé

Abstract

The article explores how upper secondary students use the learning activity mediagraphy to reflect on their identity and on media as constraining and enabling factors in their social practice. In mediagraphy, the students research four generations of their own families, including themselves. They write a mediagraphy essay on the differences and similarities across the generations in media use and turning points in individuals’ lives, in addition to societal and media-related developments. Data from student products and interviews are analysed through three “identity dilemmas” that any identity claim faces: the constant navigation between 1) continuity and change, 2) sameness and difference with regard to others, and 3) agency as “person-to-world” and “world-to-person”. The findings suggest that mediagraphy is a type of identity work that can potentially help students develop an agentive identity in a time of insecurity, with rapidly shifting social and cultural conditions and increasing media density.

Mots clés

  • mediagraphy
  • identity
  • agency
  • media use
  • media education
  • media literacy
Accès libre

Slow Television

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 95 - 108

Résumé

Abstract

Public-service broadcasters are compelled to seek innovative ways to fulfil their publicservice functions in an increasingly competitive environment. The Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK) has been experimenting with new programme formats and cross-media concepts. The concept of slow television was developed by the regional office in Bergen. On July 16, 2011, they started a five-day live broadcast from one of the cruise ships that sailed up the Norwegian coast from Bergen in southern Norway to Kirkenes near the Russian border. The broadcast was a huge success. I take this programme as a case study and provide an analysis from the perspective of innovation within public-service broadcasting. The article addresses the following questions: 1) In what way was the programme innovative? 2) How was the programme accepted and produced? 3) What accounts for the success of the broadcast in terms of number of viewers and popular engagement?

Mots clés

  • slow television
  • public service broadcasting
  • innovation
  • production
  • interactivity
  • Norway
Accès libre

Why Does the Archbishop Not Tweet?

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 109 - 123

Résumé

Abstract

In summer 2012, the Archbishop of the Church of Sweden appeared on Twitter. There was only one problem - it was not the Archbishop himself who was tweeting, but an anonymous person. A discussion then ensued on Twitter and in the blogosphere between those in favor of the Archbishop and his department and mainly social media proponents.

The present article describes and analyzes the social media debate, and how authority and hierarchies are negotiated in and through social media. The analysis is based on Heidi Campbell’s “Religious-Social Shaping of Technology” model, and emphasizes the need to take into account not only the faith and tradition of the religious actor, but also the societal context in which the negotiating process takes place. In this case, the concepts of “mediatization” and “secularization” are used to understand the broader context of the process.

Mots clés

  • authority
  • church
  • mediatization
  • religion
  • secularization
  • social media
Accès libre

The Complexity of Public Relations Work

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 125 - 139

Résumé

Abstract

Research on the PR-function is extensive, especially in the US and the UK. The managertechnician dichotomy is well known, but has been challenged by recent research where more nuanced perspectives on PR-managerial roles are displayed. In relation to this complexity of PR-managerial roles the article investigates the function and role Swedish public relations managers perform and play in their organizations. The Swedish case, with its high proportion of PR practitioners employed by public authorities, was used to further explore the complexity of PR work. The empirical data was a survey distributed to a random sample of members of the Swedish Public Relations Association, with a managerial or head/ director position, representing all industry/societal sectors. 261 persons completed the survey, giving a response rate of 30 percent. The study confirmed previous research of a more complex picture of the PR-managerial level. One important conclusion was therefore that the simple dichotomy between managers and technicians cannot be used to understand managerial level positions in the public relations context. This complexity was even further emphasized when comparing PR-mangers in the private and the public sector. One challenge pointed out for future research was to develop analyses of PR managerial roles in different types of organizations.

Mots clés

  • PR
  • PR managers roles
  • practitioners roles
  • information/communication managers
  • PR role research
Accès libre

New Literature (A selection from Nordicom’s database NCOM)

Publié en ligne: 09 Jun 2015
Pages: 141 - 158

Résumé

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