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Journal
First Published
10 Dec 2009
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4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

The East Anglian Dialect of English in the World

Published Online: 21 May 2021
Page range: -
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
10 Dec 2009
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

In the 17th century, the English region of East Anglia continued many of the major population centres of the British Isles, not least Norwich, England’s second city at that time. One might therefore predict that East Anglian dialects of English would have played a major role in determining the nature of the new colonial Englishes which were first beginning to emerge during this period. This paper considers some of the phonological and grammatical features of East Anglian English which can be argued to have been influential in this way.

Keywords

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