1. bookVolume 22 (2021): Issue 1 (June 2021)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2501-238X
First Published
16 Apr 2016
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Elements that Contribute to the Efficiency of Communication Between Teacher and Student

Published Online: 24 Jun 2021
Volume & Issue: Volume 22 (2021) - Issue 1 (June 2021)
Page range: 258 - 269
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2501-238X
First Published
16 Apr 2016
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Communication skills are one of the most important educational elements today. Current education has already included communication competencies as independent objectives in the education of young generations. Communication is a multidisciplinary existential basis and that is why its understanding is not easy, and must be approached scientifically, conceptually and structurally. This paper aims to emphasize the importance of communication in the teaching-learning process and its direct correlation with school success but also with success in life. Teachers need communication more than anyone. Their verbal communication occupies 70% of a class lesson (Haslett, 1987). The appeal to the elements of emotional intelligence, to the motivation / interests of the students, becomes a necessity and at the same time they are constituted as factors that can improve and make efficient the didactic communication. In this paper we will analyze the main functions of teacher-student communication (guidance, information and thought challenge). There are described other elements that can also contribute to better communication in the classroom: active presentation of topics, providing summaries, resumption of main ideas, clarity of presentation (sentence logic, examples and explanations), assessment of comprehension deficiencies and their correction, frequently asked questions. All these aspects have proved, through the studies carried out, that they are positively correlated with the students’ results.

The verbal communication of the educator is always accompanied by the elements of non-verbal communication that have an important role in achieving an effective instructive-educational process. In this regard, we can mention a few essential components: posture, gestures, facial expressions, style of dressing, tone of voice, all of which can incite or divert the listener’s attention. Another important element in effectiveness of the didactic communication is the knowledge of the cultural, economic and social environment from which the students come, their specific characteristics. The interaction will be more plausible, accessible to the student, when well known, culturally familiar aspects are inserted in the complex process of teacher-student communication. The integration of cultural diversity in didactic communication has become a stringent requirement of modern education.

Keywords

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