1. bookVolume 8 (2020): Issue 3 (December 2020)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
06 Mar 2015
Publication timeframe
3 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

The temporary return to the homeland in Michael Ondaatje’s Running in the Family

Published Online: 17 Jun 2021
Page range: 157 - 169
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
06 Mar 2015
Publication timeframe
3 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

This study concentrates on memory in Michael Ondaatje’s Running in the Family because it is the foundation for the whole novel. Ondaatje’s attempt creates a relationship with the past by performing all acts of the journey in physical and imaginary performances of listening and reproducing. His attempt depends on his own memory; however, his memory does not coincide with stories he has heard, and the historical documents tend to conflict with each other. In the interior of his travels, Ondaatje reveals the extent of his isolation and the impact of his displacement. As he narrates the stories, he faces difficulties in distinguishing between rumors and lies, in organizing fragments of knowledge, and in explaining challenges tied to his methods of cultural revival. These challenges are met in the non-linear and sometimes stunning text plans which he uses.

Keywords

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