1. bookVolume 44 (2019): Issue 1 (March 2019)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2300-3405
First Published
24 Oct 2012
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Attitude Towards Humanoid Robots and the Uncanny Valley Hypothesis

Published Online: 28 Mar 2019
Volume & Issue: Volume 44 (2019) - Issue 1 (March 2019)
Page range: 101 - 119
Received: 13 Aug 2018
Accepted: 21 Nov 2018
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2300-3405
First Published
24 Oct 2012
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The main aim of the presented study was to check whether the well-established measures concerning the attitude towards humanoid robots are good predictors for the uncanny valley effect. We present a study in which 12 computer rendered humanoid models were presented to our subjects. Their declared comfort level was cross-referenced with the Belief in Human Nature Uniqueness (BHNU) and the Negative Attitudes toward Robots that Display Human Traits (NARHT) scales. Subsequently, there was no evidence of a statistical significance between these scales and the existence of the uncanny valley phenomenon. However, correlations between expected stress level while human-robot interaction and both BHNU, as well as NARHT scales, were found. The study covered also the evaluation of the perceived robots’ characteristic and the emotional response to them.

Keywords

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