1. bookVolume 22 (2020): Issue 2 (January 2020)
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11 Dec 2014
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How MOOCs Can Develop Teacher Cognition: The Case of in-Service English Language Teachers

Published Online: 24 Jan 2020
Page range: 56 - 71
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
11 Dec 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Copyright
© 2020 Sciendo

Research reveals a rapid expansion of Open Educational Resources (OER) supporting global access to higher education for continued professional development (CPD) for in-service teachers. This offers interactive opportunities for participation and reflection to support the development of teacher cognition through a globally-oriented online community.

Keywords

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