1. bookVolume 69 (2019): Issue 3 (September 2019)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1820-7448
First Published
25 Mar 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Clinical and Radiological Evaluation of the Treatment of Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture in Cats with the Musculus Biceps Femoris Transposition Technique

Published Online: 24 Sep 2019
Volume & Issue: Volume 69 (2019) - Issue 3 (September 2019)
Page range: 300 - 311
Received: 01 Apr 2019
Accepted: 25 Jul 2019
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1820-7448
First Published
25 Mar 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The aim of this study was to clinically and radiologically evaluate the technique of biceps femoris muscle transposition as a new extracapsular treatment technique for cranial cruciate ligament ruptures, which are often encountered in cats. In this study, eight cats diagnosed with cranial cruciate ligament rupture were treated with the biceps femoris muscle transposition technique. The postoperative standard clinical examination procedures were applied to each cat for 90 days. In the preoperative clinical and radiological examinations of the eight cats in the study, cranial cruciate ligament rupture alone was diagnosed in seven of them. Both, the cranial cruciate ligament rupture and meniscal lesions in the same stifle joint were determined in one cat. The biceps femoris muscle transposition technique operation took approximately 20 mins in each case.

The postoperative radiographs were taken on days 10, 30, 60 and 90. No complications were seen in any case during the postoperative follow-up. The Illinois University Evaluation Scale was used for a more objective evaluation. At 90 days postoperatively, there was no lameness in seven out of eight cats, and mild limping was determined in one of them due to concomitant meniscal lesion.

According to the study results, the biceps femoris muscle transposition technique was found to be extremely useful as an easily applicable technique in the treatment of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in cats.

Keywords

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