1. bookVolume 56 (2007): Issue 1-6 (December 2007)
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Journal
eISSN
2509-8934
First Published
22 Feb 2016
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English
access type Open Access

Genetic Performance and Maximizing Genetic Gain Through Direct and Indirect Selection in Cherrybark Oak

Published Online: 14 Oct 2017
Volume & Issue: Volume 56 (2007) - Issue 1-6 (December 2007)
Page range: 80 - 87
Received: 17 Mar 2006
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2509-8934
First Published
22 Feb 2016
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English
Abstract

In 1987, an open-pollinated test of cherrybark oak (Quercus pagodae Raf.) was established on a loess site in Carlisle County, Kentucky. The test contained 37 half-sib families representing eight provenances from Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Virginia. Height measurements were taken at ages one, three, five, ten, and fifteen, and diameter at ages five, ten, and fifteen. Significant differences existed among provenances and among families within provenances. Seed sources from the west-central Mississippi area performed better for both diameter and height, yet no overall geographic trend was apparent. The top three families were all from the Warren Co., Mississippi source while two of the top three diameter families were from Washington Co., MS and the third was from Warren Co., Mississippi. Survival among the eight provenances was constant from age one to ten. A drop in survival was shown between ages 10 and 15, probably a result of inter-tree competition. Height and diameter growth between ages five and 10 was nearly double that prior to age five and between ages 10 and 15. Family heritabilities for height and diameter were calculated for each measurement year. Family heritabilities for diameter ranged from 0.55 to 0.70 while height ranged from 0.50 to 0.70. Strong age-age correlations for height, diameter, and volume were found indicating good trait predictability from early measurements. Genetic gain equations were used to identify the optimum selection age and trait for maximizing age 15 volume. Early selection of families within provenances should yield gains in height, diameter, and volume.

Keywords

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