1. bookVolume 61 (2016): Issue 1 (March 2016)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1508-5791
First Published
25 Mar 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Compressed sensing in MRI – mathematical preliminaries and basic examples

Published Online: 17 Mar 2016
Volume & Issue: Volume 61 (2016) - Issue 1 (March 2016)
Page range: 41 - 43
Received: 02 Jul 2014
Accepted: 05 Aug 2015
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1508-5791
First Published
25 Mar 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), k-space sampling, due to physical restrictions, is very time-consuming. It cannot be much improved using classical Nyquist-based sampling theory. Recent developments utilize the fact that MR images are sparse in some representations (i.e. wavelet coefficients). This new theory, created by Candès and Romberg, called compressed sensing (CS), shows that images with sparse representations can be recovered from randomly undersampled k-space data, by using nonlinear reconstruction algorithms (i.e. l1-norm minimization). Throughout this paper, mathematical preliminaries of CS are outlined, in the form introduced by Candès. We describe the main conditions for measurement matrices and recovery algorithms and present a basic example, showing that while the method really works (reducing the time of MR examination), there are some major problems that need to be taken into consideration.

Keywords

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