1. bookVolume 7 (2017): Issue 1 (December 2017)
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Journal
eISSN
2248-0854
First Published
15 Dec 2017
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1 time per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Hijab(istas)—as Fashion Phenomenon. A Review

Published Online: 27 Dec 2017
Volume & Issue: Volume 7 (2017) - Issue 1 (December 2017)
Page range: 59 - 67
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2248-0854
First Published
15 Dec 2017
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English
Abstract

In the present article, I am shortly reviewing some aspects which can be regarded as important in considering the hijab a fashion phenomenon. The social media provides us with various images in which the hijab is presented as a form of fashionable accessory, it is adapted to various modern outfits. The literature on such fashionable takes of the hijab assesses that they can be interpreted as statement messages about women’s empowerment. On the other hand, such adaptations also speak about the emergence of various subcultures about Muslim youth, which in accordance with the global sameness of youth are using social media in order to send messages and connect with each other. After a brief presentation on the role of bottom-up diffusion of fashion innovations, I am reviewing, grosso modo, two representations of the hijab: the hijab as a religious symbol and the hijab as a (fashion) manifesto about women’s empowerment.

Keywords

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