Rivista e Edizione

AHEAD OF PRINT

Volume 15 (2022): Edizione 1 (May 2022)

Volume 14 (2021): Edizione 3 (December 2021)

Volume 14 (2021): Edizione 2 (September 2021)

Volume 14 (2021): Edizione 1 (May 2021)

Volume 13 (2020): Edizione 3 (December 2020)

Volume 13 (2020): Edizione 2 (September 2020)

Volume 13 (2020): Edizione 1 (May 2020)

Volume 12 (2019): Edizione 3 (December 2019)

Volume 12 (2019): Edizione 2 (September 2019)

Volume 12 (2019): Edizione 1 (May 2019)

Volume 11 (2018): Edizione 3 (December 2018)

Volume 11 (2018): Edizione 2 (November 2018)

Volume 11 (2018): Edizione 1 (January 2018)

Volume 10 (2017): Edizione 3 (December 2017)

Volume 10 (2017): Edizione 2 (November 2017)

Volume 10 (2017): Edizione 1 (January 2017)

Volume 9 (2016): Edizione 3 (December 2016)

Volume 9 (2016): Edizione 2 (November 2016)

Volume 9 (2016): Edizione 1 (January 2016)

Volume 8 (2015): Edizione 3 (December 2015)

Volume 8 (2015): Edizione 2 (November 2015)

Volume 8 (2015): Edizione 1 (January 2015)

Volume 7 (2014): Edizione 3 (December 2014)

Volume 7 (2014): Edizione 2 (November 2014)

Volume 7 (2014): Edizione 1 (January 2014)
MEDITERRANEAN LANDSCAPES, Guest Editors: Stefan Schindler and Linda Olsvig-Whittaker

Volume 6 (2013): Edizione 3 (December 2013)

Volume 6 (2013): Edizione 2 (December 2013)

Volume 6 (2013): Edizione 1 (January 2013)

Volume 5 (2012): Edizione 3 (December 2012)

Volume 5 (2012): Edizione 2 (November 2012)

Volume 5 (2012): Edizione 1 (January 2012)

Volume 4 (2011): Edizione 3 (August 2011)

Volume 4 (2011): Edizione 2 (April 2011)

Volume 4 (2011): Edizione 1 (January 2011)

Volume 3 (2010): Edizione 2 (December 2010)

Volume 3 (2010): Edizione 1 (June 2010)

Volume 2 (2009): Edizione 2 (December 2009)

Volume 2 (2009): Edizione 1 (June 2009)

Volume 1 (2008): Edizione 2 (December 2008)

Volume 1 (2008): Edizione 1 (June 2008)

Dettagli della rivista
Formato
Rivista
eISSN
1805-4196
Pubblicato per la prima volta
20 Jun 2008
Periodo di pubblicazione
3 volte all'anno
Lingue
Inglese

Cerca

Volume 7 (2014): Edizione 3 (December 2014)

Dettagli della rivista
Formato
Rivista
eISSN
1805-4196
Pubblicato per la prima volta
20 Jun 2008
Periodo di pubblicazione
3 volte all'anno
Lingue
Inglese

Cerca

4 Articoli
Accesso libero

Effect of the Landscape Types on Hunting Selection in Roe Deer (Capreolus Capreolus, Linnaeus 1758) Trophies in Czech Republic

Pubblicato online: 29 Jan 2015
Pagine: 5 - 22

Astratto

Abstract

Czech Republic has a long tradition of hunting, and trophy hunting is important to manage game populations. In this study data was analysed from the five last trophy exhibitions in Czech Republic. Namely, hunter selection, compensatory selection, management selection, hunting pressure selection and depletion selection was tested in different landscape types. In compensatory hunting there is a difference between the landscape types; apparent differences exist between the landscape type with respect to hunting pressure. There was no hunter selection, or depletion selection, and no differences in management between landscape types. This study suggests that the landscape composition has an effect on selective hunting in Czech Republic.

Parole chiave

  • Landscapes
  • Hunting selection
  • Czech Republic
  • Roe deer
Accesso libero

Monitoring Landscape Changes in Japan Using Classification of Modis Data Combined with a Landscape Transformation Sere (LTS) Model

Pubblicato online: 29 Jan 2015
Pagine: 23 - 38

Astratto

Abstract

Japan, with over 75% forest cover, is one of the most heavily forested countries in the world. Various types of climax forest are distributed according to latitude and altitude. At the same time, human intervention in Japan has historically been intensive, and many forest habitats show the influence of various levels of disturbance. Furthermore, Japanese landscapes are changing rapidly, and a system of efficient monitoring is needed. The aim of this research was to identify major historical trends in Japanese landscape change and to develop a system for identifying and monitoring patterns of landscape change at the national level. To provide a base for comparison, Warmth Index (WI) climatic data was digitalized and utilized to map potential climax vegetation for all of Japan. Extant Land Use Information System (LUIS) data were then modified and digitalized to generate national level Land Use/Land Cover (LU/LC) distribution maps for 1900, 1950 and 1985. In addition, MODIS data for 2001 acquired by the Tokyo University of Information Sciences were utilized for remote LU/LC classification using an unsupervised method on multi-temporal composite data. Eight classification categories were established using the ISODATA (cluster analyses) method; alpine plant communities, evergreen coniferous forest, evergreen broad-leaved forest, deciduous broad-leaved forest, mixed forest, arable land (irrigated rice paddy, non-irrigated, grassland), urban area, river and marsh. The results of the LUIS analyses and MODIS classifications were interpreted in terms of a Landscape Transformation Sere model assuming that under increasing levels of human disturbance the landscape will change through a series of stages. The results showed that overall forest cover in Japan has actually increased over the century covered by the data; from 72.1% in 1900 to 76.9% in 2001. Comparison of the actual vegetation and the potential vegetation as predicted by WI, however, indicated that in many areas the climax vegetation has been replaced by secondary forests such as conifer timber plantations. This trend was especially strong in the warm and mid temperate zones of western Japan. This research also demonstrated that classification of moderate resolution remote sensing data, interpreted within a LTS framework, can be an effective tool for efficient and repeat monitoring of landscape changes at the national level. In the future, the authors plan to continue utilizing this approach to track rapidly occurring changes in Japanese landscapes at the national level.

Key words

  • Landscape change
  • Landscape Transformation Sere
  • Monitoring
  • MODIS
  • Remote sensing
Accesso libero

Climatic Characteristics of Forest Vegetation Zones of the Czech Republic

Pubblicato online: 29 Jan 2015
Pagine: 39 - 48

Astratto

Abstract

Correct derivation of climatic characteristics of forest vegetation zones is the Achilles heel of Forest site classification in the Czech Republic. A combination of low density of climatic stations, and their unsuitable location (in regard to distribution of forest complexes) make obtaining data problematic.

An important contribution to this issue is an application of aladin-climate.cz model materials from the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI) for the second time period of normal climate years 1961-1990, and the current period from 1991-2009. Calculation of climatic (temperature, precipitation, etc.) fields was conducted on a basis of observation stations. The original station series were subjected to quality control, meaning they were homogenised and supplemented by missing values in measurements. The actual calculation of the technical series is based on the IDW (Inverse Distance Weighting) method; data is used when surrounding stations are first standardised to altitude point, for which we expect a new line, and then calculated a weighted average of new value. The station data were interpolated using the geostatistical linear kriging method.

The outputs are the spatial averages for basic climatic zonal forest vegetation level, occurring in the different Natural Forest Areas (NFA). The individual climate parameters of forest vegetation zones were evaluated by regression analysis. The climate-vegetation segments (CVS) of the Czech Republic, which share similar climatic characteristics of the forest vegetation zones (FVZ), were proposed.

Key words

  • Forest Vegetation Zone
  • climate parameters
  • Natural Forest Area
  • Climate-Vegetation Segments
Accesso libero

Potential of High-Resolution Satellite Imagery for Mapping Distribution and Evaluating Ecological Characteristics of Tree Species at the Angkor Monument, Cambodia

Pubblicato online: 29 Jan 2015
Pagine: 49 - 59

Astratto

Abstract

Large trees play several vital roles in the Angkor monuments landscape. They protect biodiversity, enhance the tourism experience, and provide various ecosystem services to local residents. A clear understanding of forest composition and distribution of individual species, as well as timely monitoring of changes, is necessary for conservation of these trees. using traditional field work, obtaining this sort of data is time-consuming and labour-intensive. This research investigates classification of very high resolution remote sensing data as a tool for efficient analyses. QuickBird satellite imagery was used to clarify the tree species community in and around Preah Khan temple, to elucidate differences in ecological traits among the three dominant species (Dipterocarpus alatus, Lagerstroemia calyculata and Tetrameles nudiflora), and to identify crowns of the dominant species.

Population structures of trees were determined using a 14.26ha study plot. Species name, DBH, height, height under the crown and crown area were recorded for all trees over 40 cm in DBH. Tree locations were also recorded so as to provide references for the imagery analysis. Ecological traits of the dominant species were estimated using regressions by an expanded allometric equation for both large and small trees, based on DBH, height, height under the crown and crown width.

The total number of species in the study plot was 45. From a spatial perspective, the three dominant species over 100 cm in DBH were segregated from each other. D. alatus, L. calyculata and T. nudiflora were concentrated, respectively, along the approach to the temple, near the centre of the complex, and on the walls of the monument. Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA) conducted using QuickBird satellite imagery, showed that crowns of D. alatus were largely determined by maximum of NIR layer and mean of digital number in panchromatic layer. Differences in the parameters for both asymptotic height and spatial distribution among the dominant species, result from differences in ecological traits, and enhance the value of the tourism resource by providing a dramatic shift of forest scenery that can be enjoyed by visitors to the monument.

Key words

  • allometric relationships
  • object based image analysis
  • QuickBird imagery
  • spatial distribution
  • tree community
4 Articoli
Accesso libero

Effect of the Landscape Types on Hunting Selection in Roe Deer (Capreolus Capreolus, Linnaeus 1758) Trophies in Czech Republic

Pubblicato online: 29 Jan 2015
Pagine: 5 - 22

Astratto

Abstract

Czech Republic has a long tradition of hunting, and trophy hunting is important to manage game populations. In this study data was analysed from the five last trophy exhibitions in Czech Republic. Namely, hunter selection, compensatory selection, management selection, hunting pressure selection and depletion selection was tested in different landscape types. In compensatory hunting there is a difference between the landscape types; apparent differences exist between the landscape type with respect to hunting pressure. There was no hunter selection, or depletion selection, and no differences in management between landscape types. This study suggests that the landscape composition has an effect on selective hunting in Czech Republic.

Parole chiave

  • Landscapes
  • Hunting selection
  • Czech Republic
  • Roe deer
Accesso libero

Monitoring Landscape Changes in Japan Using Classification of Modis Data Combined with a Landscape Transformation Sere (LTS) Model

Pubblicato online: 29 Jan 2015
Pagine: 23 - 38

Astratto

Abstract

Japan, with over 75% forest cover, is one of the most heavily forested countries in the world. Various types of climax forest are distributed according to latitude and altitude. At the same time, human intervention in Japan has historically been intensive, and many forest habitats show the influence of various levels of disturbance. Furthermore, Japanese landscapes are changing rapidly, and a system of efficient monitoring is needed. The aim of this research was to identify major historical trends in Japanese landscape change and to develop a system for identifying and monitoring patterns of landscape change at the national level. To provide a base for comparison, Warmth Index (WI) climatic data was digitalized and utilized to map potential climax vegetation for all of Japan. Extant Land Use Information System (LUIS) data were then modified and digitalized to generate national level Land Use/Land Cover (LU/LC) distribution maps for 1900, 1950 and 1985. In addition, MODIS data for 2001 acquired by the Tokyo University of Information Sciences were utilized for remote LU/LC classification using an unsupervised method on multi-temporal composite data. Eight classification categories were established using the ISODATA (cluster analyses) method; alpine plant communities, evergreen coniferous forest, evergreen broad-leaved forest, deciduous broad-leaved forest, mixed forest, arable land (irrigated rice paddy, non-irrigated, grassland), urban area, river and marsh. The results of the LUIS analyses and MODIS classifications were interpreted in terms of a Landscape Transformation Sere model assuming that under increasing levels of human disturbance the landscape will change through a series of stages. The results showed that overall forest cover in Japan has actually increased over the century covered by the data; from 72.1% in 1900 to 76.9% in 2001. Comparison of the actual vegetation and the potential vegetation as predicted by WI, however, indicated that in many areas the climax vegetation has been replaced by secondary forests such as conifer timber plantations. This trend was especially strong in the warm and mid temperate zones of western Japan. This research also demonstrated that classification of moderate resolution remote sensing data, interpreted within a LTS framework, can be an effective tool for efficient and repeat monitoring of landscape changes at the national level. In the future, the authors plan to continue utilizing this approach to track rapidly occurring changes in Japanese landscapes at the national level.

Key words

  • Landscape change
  • Landscape Transformation Sere
  • Monitoring
  • MODIS
  • Remote sensing
Accesso libero

Climatic Characteristics of Forest Vegetation Zones of the Czech Republic

Pubblicato online: 29 Jan 2015
Pagine: 39 - 48

Astratto

Abstract

Correct derivation of climatic characteristics of forest vegetation zones is the Achilles heel of Forest site classification in the Czech Republic. A combination of low density of climatic stations, and their unsuitable location (in regard to distribution of forest complexes) make obtaining data problematic.

An important contribution to this issue is an application of aladin-climate.cz model materials from the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI) for the second time period of normal climate years 1961-1990, and the current period from 1991-2009. Calculation of climatic (temperature, precipitation, etc.) fields was conducted on a basis of observation stations. The original station series were subjected to quality control, meaning they were homogenised and supplemented by missing values in measurements. The actual calculation of the technical series is based on the IDW (Inverse Distance Weighting) method; data is used when surrounding stations are first standardised to altitude point, for which we expect a new line, and then calculated a weighted average of new value. The station data were interpolated using the geostatistical linear kriging method.

The outputs are the spatial averages for basic climatic zonal forest vegetation level, occurring in the different Natural Forest Areas (NFA). The individual climate parameters of forest vegetation zones were evaluated by regression analysis. The climate-vegetation segments (CVS) of the Czech Republic, which share similar climatic characteristics of the forest vegetation zones (FVZ), were proposed.

Key words

  • Forest Vegetation Zone
  • climate parameters
  • Natural Forest Area
  • Climate-Vegetation Segments
Accesso libero

Potential of High-Resolution Satellite Imagery for Mapping Distribution and Evaluating Ecological Characteristics of Tree Species at the Angkor Monument, Cambodia

Pubblicato online: 29 Jan 2015
Pagine: 49 - 59

Astratto

Abstract

Large trees play several vital roles in the Angkor monuments landscape. They protect biodiversity, enhance the tourism experience, and provide various ecosystem services to local residents. A clear understanding of forest composition and distribution of individual species, as well as timely monitoring of changes, is necessary for conservation of these trees. using traditional field work, obtaining this sort of data is time-consuming and labour-intensive. This research investigates classification of very high resolution remote sensing data as a tool for efficient analyses. QuickBird satellite imagery was used to clarify the tree species community in and around Preah Khan temple, to elucidate differences in ecological traits among the three dominant species (Dipterocarpus alatus, Lagerstroemia calyculata and Tetrameles nudiflora), and to identify crowns of the dominant species.

Population structures of trees were determined using a 14.26ha study plot. Species name, DBH, height, height under the crown and crown area were recorded for all trees over 40 cm in DBH. Tree locations were also recorded so as to provide references for the imagery analysis. Ecological traits of the dominant species were estimated using regressions by an expanded allometric equation for both large and small trees, based on DBH, height, height under the crown and crown width.

The total number of species in the study plot was 45. From a spatial perspective, the three dominant species over 100 cm in DBH were segregated from each other. D. alatus, L. calyculata and T. nudiflora were concentrated, respectively, along the approach to the temple, near the centre of the complex, and on the walls of the monument. Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA) conducted using QuickBird satellite imagery, showed that crowns of D. alatus were largely determined by maximum of NIR layer and mean of digital number in panchromatic layer. Differences in the parameters for both asymptotic height and spatial distribution among the dominant species, result from differences in ecological traits, and enhance the value of the tourism resource by providing a dramatic shift of forest scenery that can be enjoyed by visitors to the monument.

Key words

  • allometric relationships
  • object based image analysis
  • QuickBird imagery
  • spatial distribution
  • tree community

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