Rivista e Edizione

AHEAD OF PRINT

Volume 37 (2021): Edizione 1 (December 2021)

Volume 36 (2021): Edizione 1 (June 2021)

Volume 35 (2020): Edizione 1 (December 2020)

Volume 34 (2020): Edizione 1 (June 2020)

Volume 33 (2019): Edizione 1 (December 2019)

Volume 32 (2019): Edizione 1 (June 2019)

Volume 31 (2018): Edizione 1 (December 2018)

Volume 30 (2018): Edizione 1 (June 2018)

Volume 29 (2017): Edizione 1 (December 2017)

Volume 28 (2017): Edizione 1 (June 2017)

Volume 27 (2016): Edizione 1 (December 2016)

Volume 26 (2016): Edizione 1 (June 2016)

Volume 25 (2015): Edizione 1 (December 2015)

Volume 24 (2015): Edizione 1 (June 2015)

Volume 23 (2014): Edizione 1 (December 2014)

Volume 22 (2014): Edizione 1 (July 2014)

Volume 21 (2014): Edizione 1 (January 2014)

Volume 20 (2013): Edizione 1 (June 2013)

Volume 19 (2012): Edizione 2012 (December 2012)

Dettagli della rivista
Formato
Rivista
eISSN
1841-964X
Pubblicato per la prima volta
01 Jan 2012
Periodo di pubblicazione
2 volte all'anno
Lingue
Inglese

Cerca

Volume 29 (2017): Edizione 1 (December 2017)

Dettagli della rivista
Formato
Rivista
eISSN
1841-964X
Pubblicato per la prima volta
01 Jan 2012
Periodo di pubblicazione
2 volte all'anno
Lingue
Inglese

Cerca

14 Articoli
Accesso libero

Editorial

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 5 - 22

Astratto

Accesso libero

Dis/Graceful Liberties: Textual Libertinism/ Libertine Texts in J.M. Coetzee’s Disgrace

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 23 - 45

Astratto

Abstract

This essay addresses J.M. Coetzee’s Disgrace, a Booker Prize winner in 1999. The novel captures South African political and cultural turmoil attending the post-apartheid transitional period. Far from overlooking the political allegory, I propose instead to expand on a topic only cursorily developed elsewhere, namely liberty and license. The two terms foreground the textual dynamics of the novel as they compete and/or negotiate meaning and ascendency. I argue that Disgrace is energized by Coetzee’s belief in a total liberty of artistic production. Sex is philosophically problematized in the text and advocated as a serious issue that deserves artistic investigation without restriction or censorship. This essay looks into the subtle libertinism in Coetzee’s text, which displays pornographic overtones without exhibiting a flamboyant libertinage. Disgrace acquires its libertine gesture from its dialogue with several literary works steeped in libertinism. The troubled relationship between the aesthetic and the ethical yields an ambiguous text that invites a responsible act of reading.

Parole chiave

  • J.M. Coetzee
  • South Africa
  • Post-apartheid
  • intertextuality
  • liberty and license
  • literature and philosophy
  • libertinage
  • freedom
  • sexuality
Accesso libero

Alternative Ways of Challenging and Resisting in Richard Rodriguez’s Darling: A Spiritual Autobiography

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 46 - 64

Astratto

Abstract

There are several reasons why essayist Richard Rodriguez could be classified as a ‘minority’ writer; namely, his Mexican-American roots, his Catholic faith, and his self- declared homosexuality. However, readers who expect his writings to display the kind of attitudes and features that are common in works by other ‘minority’ authors are bound to be disappointed. The meditations that Rodriguez offers are far from clearly dividing the world between oppressors and oppressed or dominant and subaltern. As he sees it, ethnic, religious, class or sexual categories and divisions present further complications than those immediately apparent to the eye. Does this mean that Rodriguez fails to resist and challenge the dynamics he observes between different social groups? Or that his observations are complaisant rather than subversive? Not necessarily, since his essays are always a tribute to the possibilities of disagreement and defiance. My analysis of his latest collection of essays, Darling: A Spiritual Autobiography (2013), maps out and dissects the writing strategies that Rodriguez employs to generate dialogical forms of inquiry and resistance regarding such up-to-date topics as religious clashes (and commonalities), Gay rights (in relation to other Human Rights) or how public spaces are being re-imagined in this global, digital era.

Parole chiave

  • minority writing
  • resistance
  • religion
  • sexuality
  • place
  • writing strategies
  • essay form
  • dialogic structures
  • Richard Rodriguez
Accesso libero

“Nobody gets out alive. This place just a big coffin”: On Death and Dying in American Prisons

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 65 - 83

Astratto

Abstract

This article explores the manner in which the narratives in the Prison Noir volume (2014) edited by Joyce Carol Oates bring into view the limits and abusive practices of the American criminal justice system within the confines of one of its most secretive sites, the prison. Taking an insider’s perspective - all stories are written by award-winning former or current prisoners - the volume creates room for the usually silent voices of those incarcerated in correctional facilities throughout the United States. The article engages the effects of “prisonization” and the subsequent mortification of inmates by focusing on images of death and dying in American prisons, whether understood as a ‘social death,’ the isolation from any meaningful intercourse with society, as a ‘civil death,’ the stripping away of citizenship rights and legal protections, or as the physical termination of life as a result of illness, murder, suicide or statesponsored execution.

Parole chiave

  • prison literature
  • death
  • mortification
  • solitary confinement
  • rape
  • suicide
  • murder
  • social death
  • civil death
Accesso libero

The Latest Battle: Depictions of the Calormen in The Chronicles of Narnia

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 84 - 102

Astratto

Abstract

Two books in C.S. Lewis’s young adult fantasy series Chronicles of Narnia - The Horse and His Boy and The Last Battle - paint an uncomfortable portrait of the Calormen, the traditional foil for the Narnians. Throughout the text, the Calormen are clearly marked both culturally and racially as Middle Eastern, perhaps specifically as Turkish or Arab in their socio-political power structure with harems, arranged marriages, and facial hair designating status. Even Tashbaan, the capital city of Calormen, reads somewhat like a description of Istanbul. Throughout these two books, the Calormen are portrayed as a sinister and conquest-driven culture threatening the freedom enjoyed by Narnia. This textual indictment is fairly consistent. In demonizing this group, Lewis took part in a literary tradition extending back hundreds of years, a tradition that has enjoyed renewed resonance with increased fears over the growth of Islam. From Sir John Mandeville to post-9/11 concerns over terrorism, western depictions of Islam have often revolved around fear and distrust. The Last Battle is particularly problematic in its allegorical depictions of Islam, as Lewis seems to suggest that salvation is only reserved for those who follow the lion Aslan, clearly marked throughout the series as a stand-in for Jesus Christ.

Parole chiave

  • Literature
  • Fantasy
  • C.S. Lewis
  • Narnia
  • Islam
  • Christianity
  • Young Adult
  • Allegory
  • Redemption
  • Salvation
Accesso libero

Death, Innocence, and the Cyborg: Theorizing the Gynoid Double-Bind in Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell II: Innocence

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 103 - 125

Astratto

Abstract

In Donna Haraway’s “A Cyborg Manifesto” (1983), the author presents a discussion of the concept and praxis of the cyborg in emancipatory terms. Haraway presents the cyborg as a transgressive and latently mercurial figure that decouples and contravenes numerous exploitative ideological frameworks of repressive biopower that repress human being and reproduce the conditions of said repression. Using Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell II: Innocence (2004) as a dialogic case study, this essay explores the manner in which the cyborg, particularly its figuration as female-gendered anthropic machine or gynoid in 20th- and 21st-century science fiction, simultaneously confirms and contradicts Haraway’s assessment of the concept of the cyborg. As to its methodology, this essay opens with a contextualizing excursus on the cyber-being in contemporary Western society and sociopolitics, with a view to offering a framework analysis of the figuration of the gynoid in Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell II: Innocence as a recent example of contemporary science fiction’s representation of the issues and debates inherent to the concept of the gynoid. Lastly, this essay performs a detailed close reading of Oshii’s text in relation to its exploration of themes of the conceptual emancipatory potential of the cyber-being and the paradoxically exploitative patriarchal power relations that re-inscribe said potential within what this essay refers to as ‘the gynoid double-bind.’

Parole chiave

  • Anime
  • cyborg
  • Donna Haraway
  • onto-existentialism
  • emancipation
  • exploitation
  • double-bind
  • Mamoru Oshii
  • consciousness
  • reproduction
Accesso libero

“Ava’s body is a good one”: (Dis)Embodiment in Ex Machina

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 126 - 146

Astratto

Abstract

This article discusses the role of the body in Alex Garland’s film Ex Machina (2015). It focuses on Ava’s female cyborg body against the backdrop of both classic post-humanist theories and current reflections from scholars in the field of body studies. I argue that Ex Machina addresses but also transcends questions of gender and feminism. It stresses the importance of the body for social interaction both in the virtual as well as the real world. Ava’s lack of humanity results from her mind that is derived from the digital network Blue Book in which disembodied communication dominates. Moreover, the particular construction of Nathan’s progeny demonstrates his longing for a docile sex toy since he created Ava with fully functional genitals but without morals. Ex Machina further exhibits various network metaphors both on the visual and the audio level that contribute to the (re)acknowledgement that we need a body in order to be human.

Parole chiave

  • gender
  • technology
  • post-humanism
  • cyborg
  • body
  • social media
  • Ex Machina
  • film
  • feminism
Accesso libero

Food for Thought: Of Tables, Art and Women in Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 147 - 168

Astratto

Abstract

This article examines art as it is depicted ekphrastically or merely suggested in two scenes from Virginia Woolf’s novel To the Lighthouse, to critique its androcentric assumptions by appeal to art criticism, feminist theories of the gaze, and critique of the en-gendering of discursive practices in the West. The first scene concerns Mrs Ramsay’s artinformed appreciation of her daughter’s dish of fruit for the dinner party. I interpret the fruit composition as akin to Dutch still life paintings; nevertheless, the scene’s aestheticisation of everyday life also betrays visual affinities with the female nude genre. Mrs Ramsay’s critical appraisal of ways of looking at the fruit - her own as an art connoisseur’s, and Augustus Carmichael’s as a voracious plunderer’s - receives a philosophical slant in the other scene I examine, Lily Briscoe’s nonfigurative painting of Mrs Ramsay. The portrait remediates artistically the reductive thrust of traditional philosophy as espoused by Mr Ramsay and, like the nature of reality in philosophical discourse, yields to a “scientific” explication to the uninformed viewer. Notwithstanding its feminist reversal of philosophy’s classic hierarchy (male knower over against female object), coterminous with Lily’s early playful grip on philosophy, the scene ultimately fails to offer a viable non-androcentric outlook on life.

Parole chiave

  • To the Lighthouse
  • en-gendering (Teresa de Lauretis)
  • gaze (Laura Mulvey)
  • aestheticisation of everyday life
  • art
  • pronkstilleven (“banquet still life” painting)
  • “still life of disorder” (Norman Bryson)
  • philosophy
  • orientation (Edmund Husserl)
Accesso libero

There’s a Double Tongue in Cheek: On the Un(Translatability) of Shakespeare’s Bawdy Puns into Romanian

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 169 - 189

Astratto

Abstract

The translatability of William Shakespeare’s titillating puns has been a topic of recurrent debate in the field of translation studies, with some scholars arguing that they are untranslatable and others maintaining that such an endeavour implies a divorce from formal equivalence. Romanian translators have not troubled themselves with settling this dispute, focusing instead on recreating them as bawdily and punningly as possible in their first language. At least, this is the conclusion to which George Volceanov has come after analysing a sample of Shakespearean ribald puns and their Romanian equivalents. By drawing parallels between such instances of the Bard’s rhetoric and three of their Romanian translations, my article aims to reinforce the view according to which Romanian translators have succeeded, by and large, in translating Shakespeare’s bawdy puns into their mother tongue.

Parole chiave

  • William Shakespeare
  • translation
  • Dirk Delabastita
  • pun
  • bawdy
  • Romanian
Accesso libero

Irvine Welsh in Sibiu

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 191 - 196

Astratto

Accesso libero

Michael Wood. On Empson. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton UP, 2017. (£18.95 Hd.). Pp 212. ISBN 978-0-691-163-765.

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 198 - 200

Astratto

Accesso libero

Michaela Mudure, ed. Mary Wollstonecraft: Reflections and Interpretations. Cluj-Napoca: Napoca Star, 2017. (£18.95 Hd.) Pp 265. ISBN 978-606-690-143-7.

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 201 - 202

Astratto

Accesso libero

Renate Haas, ed. Rewriting Academia: The Development of the Anglicist Women’s and Gender Studies of Continental Europe. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2015. (Open Access.) Pp 442. ISBN 978-3-631-66985-3.

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 203 - 208

Astratto

Accesso libero

Alexander Search with Suman Gupta, Fabio Akcelrud Durão and Terrence McDonough. Entrepreneurial Literary Theory: A Debate on Research and the Future of Academia. London: Shot in the Dark, 2017. (Open Access.) Pp 271. ISBN 978-1-5272-1118-6.

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 209 - 212

Astratto

14 Articoli
Accesso libero

Editorial

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 5 - 22

Astratto

Accesso libero

Dis/Graceful Liberties: Textual Libertinism/ Libertine Texts in J.M. Coetzee’s Disgrace

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 23 - 45

Astratto

Abstract

This essay addresses J.M. Coetzee’s Disgrace, a Booker Prize winner in 1999. The novel captures South African political and cultural turmoil attending the post-apartheid transitional period. Far from overlooking the political allegory, I propose instead to expand on a topic only cursorily developed elsewhere, namely liberty and license. The two terms foreground the textual dynamics of the novel as they compete and/or negotiate meaning and ascendency. I argue that Disgrace is energized by Coetzee’s belief in a total liberty of artistic production. Sex is philosophically problematized in the text and advocated as a serious issue that deserves artistic investigation without restriction or censorship. This essay looks into the subtle libertinism in Coetzee’s text, which displays pornographic overtones without exhibiting a flamboyant libertinage. Disgrace acquires its libertine gesture from its dialogue with several literary works steeped in libertinism. The troubled relationship between the aesthetic and the ethical yields an ambiguous text that invites a responsible act of reading.

Parole chiave

  • J.M. Coetzee
  • South Africa
  • Post-apartheid
  • intertextuality
  • liberty and license
  • literature and philosophy
  • libertinage
  • freedom
  • sexuality
Accesso libero

Alternative Ways of Challenging and Resisting in Richard Rodriguez’s Darling: A Spiritual Autobiography

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 46 - 64

Astratto

Abstract

There are several reasons why essayist Richard Rodriguez could be classified as a ‘minority’ writer; namely, his Mexican-American roots, his Catholic faith, and his self- declared homosexuality. However, readers who expect his writings to display the kind of attitudes and features that are common in works by other ‘minority’ authors are bound to be disappointed. The meditations that Rodriguez offers are far from clearly dividing the world between oppressors and oppressed or dominant and subaltern. As he sees it, ethnic, religious, class or sexual categories and divisions present further complications than those immediately apparent to the eye. Does this mean that Rodriguez fails to resist and challenge the dynamics he observes between different social groups? Or that his observations are complaisant rather than subversive? Not necessarily, since his essays are always a tribute to the possibilities of disagreement and defiance. My analysis of his latest collection of essays, Darling: A Spiritual Autobiography (2013), maps out and dissects the writing strategies that Rodriguez employs to generate dialogical forms of inquiry and resistance regarding such up-to-date topics as religious clashes (and commonalities), Gay rights (in relation to other Human Rights) or how public spaces are being re-imagined in this global, digital era.

Parole chiave

  • minority writing
  • resistance
  • religion
  • sexuality
  • place
  • writing strategies
  • essay form
  • dialogic structures
  • Richard Rodriguez
Accesso libero

“Nobody gets out alive. This place just a big coffin”: On Death and Dying in American Prisons

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 65 - 83

Astratto

Abstract

This article explores the manner in which the narratives in the Prison Noir volume (2014) edited by Joyce Carol Oates bring into view the limits and abusive practices of the American criminal justice system within the confines of one of its most secretive sites, the prison. Taking an insider’s perspective - all stories are written by award-winning former or current prisoners - the volume creates room for the usually silent voices of those incarcerated in correctional facilities throughout the United States. The article engages the effects of “prisonization” and the subsequent mortification of inmates by focusing on images of death and dying in American prisons, whether understood as a ‘social death,’ the isolation from any meaningful intercourse with society, as a ‘civil death,’ the stripping away of citizenship rights and legal protections, or as the physical termination of life as a result of illness, murder, suicide or statesponsored execution.

Parole chiave

  • prison literature
  • death
  • mortification
  • solitary confinement
  • rape
  • suicide
  • murder
  • social death
  • civil death
Accesso libero

The Latest Battle: Depictions of the Calormen in The Chronicles of Narnia

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 84 - 102

Astratto

Abstract

Two books in C.S. Lewis’s young adult fantasy series Chronicles of Narnia - The Horse and His Boy and The Last Battle - paint an uncomfortable portrait of the Calormen, the traditional foil for the Narnians. Throughout the text, the Calormen are clearly marked both culturally and racially as Middle Eastern, perhaps specifically as Turkish or Arab in their socio-political power structure with harems, arranged marriages, and facial hair designating status. Even Tashbaan, the capital city of Calormen, reads somewhat like a description of Istanbul. Throughout these two books, the Calormen are portrayed as a sinister and conquest-driven culture threatening the freedom enjoyed by Narnia. This textual indictment is fairly consistent. In demonizing this group, Lewis took part in a literary tradition extending back hundreds of years, a tradition that has enjoyed renewed resonance with increased fears over the growth of Islam. From Sir John Mandeville to post-9/11 concerns over terrorism, western depictions of Islam have often revolved around fear and distrust. The Last Battle is particularly problematic in its allegorical depictions of Islam, as Lewis seems to suggest that salvation is only reserved for those who follow the lion Aslan, clearly marked throughout the series as a stand-in for Jesus Christ.

Parole chiave

  • Literature
  • Fantasy
  • C.S. Lewis
  • Narnia
  • Islam
  • Christianity
  • Young Adult
  • Allegory
  • Redemption
  • Salvation
Accesso libero

Death, Innocence, and the Cyborg: Theorizing the Gynoid Double-Bind in Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell II: Innocence

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 103 - 125

Astratto

Abstract

In Donna Haraway’s “A Cyborg Manifesto” (1983), the author presents a discussion of the concept and praxis of the cyborg in emancipatory terms. Haraway presents the cyborg as a transgressive and latently mercurial figure that decouples and contravenes numerous exploitative ideological frameworks of repressive biopower that repress human being and reproduce the conditions of said repression. Using Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell II: Innocence (2004) as a dialogic case study, this essay explores the manner in which the cyborg, particularly its figuration as female-gendered anthropic machine or gynoid in 20th- and 21st-century science fiction, simultaneously confirms and contradicts Haraway’s assessment of the concept of the cyborg. As to its methodology, this essay opens with a contextualizing excursus on the cyber-being in contemporary Western society and sociopolitics, with a view to offering a framework analysis of the figuration of the gynoid in Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell II: Innocence as a recent example of contemporary science fiction’s representation of the issues and debates inherent to the concept of the gynoid. Lastly, this essay performs a detailed close reading of Oshii’s text in relation to its exploration of themes of the conceptual emancipatory potential of the cyber-being and the paradoxically exploitative patriarchal power relations that re-inscribe said potential within what this essay refers to as ‘the gynoid double-bind.’

Parole chiave

  • Anime
  • cyborg
  • Donna Haraway
  • onto-existentialism
  • emancipation
  • exploitation
  • double-bind
  • Mamoru Oshii
  • consciousness
  • reproduction
Accesso libero

“Ava’s body is a good one”: (Dis)Embodiment in Ex Machina

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 126 - 146

Astratto

Abstract

This article discusses the role of the body in Alex Garland’s film Ex Machina (2015). It focuses on Ava’s female cyborg body against the backdrop of both classic post-humanist theories and current reflections from scholars in the field of body studies. I argue that Ex Machina addresses but also transcends questions of gender and feminism. It stresses the importance of the body for social interaction both in the virtual as well as the real world. Ava’s lack of humanity results from her mind that is derived from the digital network Blue Book in which disembodied communication dominates. Moreover, the particular construction of Nathan’s progeny demonstrates his longing for a docile sex toy since he created Ava with fully functional genitals but without morals. Ex Machina further exhibits various network metaphors both on the visual and the audio level that contribute to the (re)acknowledgement that we need a body in order to be human.

Parole chiave

  • gender
  • technology
  • post-humanism
  • cyborg
  • body
  • social media
  • Ex Machina
  • film
  • feminism
Accesso libero

Food for Thought: Of Tables, Art and Women in Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 147 - 168

Astratto

Abstract

This article examines art as it is depicted ekphrastically or merely suggested in two scenes from Virginia Woolf’s novel To the Lighthouse, to critique its androcentric assumptions by appeal to art criticism, feminist theories of the gaze, and critique of the en-gendering of discursive practices in the West. The first scene concerns Mrs Ramsay’s artinformed appreciation of her daughter’s dish of fruit for the dinner party. I interpret the fruit composition as akin to Dutch still life paintings; nevertheless, the scene’s aestheticisation of everyday life also betrays visual affinities with the female nude genre. Mrs Ramsay’s critical appraisal of ways of looking at the fruit - her own as an art connoisseur’s, and Augustus Carmichael’s as a voracious plunderer’s - receives a philosophical slant in the other scene I examine, Lily Briscoe’s nonfigurative painting of Mrs Ramsay. The portrait remediates artistically the reductive thrust of traditional philosophy as espoused by Mr Ramsay and, like the nature of reality in philosophical discourse, yields to a “scientific” explication to the uninformed viewer. Notwithstanding its feminist reversal of philosophy’s classic hierarchy (male knower over against female object), coterminous with Lily’s early playful grip on philosophy, the scene ultimately fails to offer a viable non-androcentric outlook on life.

Parole chiave

  • To the Lighthouse
  • en-gendering (Teresa de Lauretis)
  • gaze (Laura Mulvey)
  • aestheticisation of everyday life
  • art
  • pronkstilleven (“banquet still life” painting)
  • “still life of disorder” (Norman Bryson)
  • philosophy
  • orientation (Edmund Husserl)
Accesso libero

There’s a Double Tongue in Cheek: On the Un(Translatability) of Shakespeare’s Bawdy Puns into Romanian

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 169 - 189

Astratto

Abstract

The translatability of William Shakespeare’s titillating puns has been a topic of recurrent debate in the field of translation studies, with some scholars arguing that they are untranslatable and others maintaining that such an endeavour implies a divorce from formal equivalence. Romanian translators have not troubled themselves with settling this dispute, focusing instead on recreating them as bawdily and punningly as possible in their first language. At least, this is the conclusion to which George Volceanov has come after analysing a sample of Shakespearean ribald puns and their Romanian equivalents. By drawing parallels between such instances of the Bard’s rhetoric and three of their Romanian translations, my article aims to reinforce the view according to which Romanian translators have succeeded, by and large, in translating Shakespeare’s bawdy puns into their mother tongue.

Parole chiave

  • William Shakespeare
  • translation
  • Dirk Delabastita
  • pun
  • bawdy
  • Romanian
Accesso libero

Irvine Welsh in Sibiu

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 191 - 196

Astratto

Accesso libero

Michael Wood. On Empson. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton UP, 2017. (£18.95 Hd.). Pp 212. ISBN 978-0-691-163-765.

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 198 - 200

Astratto

Accesso libero

Michaela Mudure, ed. Mary Wollstonecraft: Reflections and Interpretations. Cluj-Napoca: Napoca Star, 2017. (£18.95 Hd.) Pp 265. ISBN 978-606-690-143-7.

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 201 - 202

Astratto

Accesso libero

Renate Haas, ed. Rewriting Academia: The Development of the Anglicist Women’s and Gender Studies of Continental Europe. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2015. (Open Access.) Pp 442. ISBN 978-3-631-66985-3.

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 203 - 208

Astratto

Accesso libero

Alexander Search with Suman Gupta, Fabio Akcelrud Durão and Terrence McDonough. Entrepreneurial Literary Theory: A Debate on Research and the Future of Academia. London: Shot in the Dark, 2017. (Open Access.) Pp 271. ISBN 978-1-5272-1118-6.

Pubblicato online: 16 Jan 2018
Pagine: 209 - 212

Astratto

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