1. bookVolume 14 (2021): Edizione 1 (June 2021)
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Rivista
eISSN
2029-0454
Prima pubblicazione
05 Feb 2009
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2 volte all'anno
Lingue
Inglese
Accesso libero

The Price of Medical Negligence – Should it Be Judged by the Criminal Court in the Context of the Jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights?

Pubblicato online: 08 Oct 2021
Volume & Edizione: Volume 14 (2021) - Edizione 1 (June 2021)
Pagine: 124 - 152
Ricevuto: 13 Apr 2021
Accettato: 28 Jul 2021
Dettagli della rivista
License
Formato
Rivista
eISSN
2029-0454
Prima pubblicazione
05 Feb 2009
Frequenza di pubblicazione
2 volte all'anno
Lingue
Inglese
Abstract

The article deals with a recently relevant issue – whether a doctor who has made an error or was negligent during his or her professional activity that has resulted in injury or death should be prosecuted, whether this type of liability is not too strict, and whether it is proportionate and adequate to the specificities of the medical profession. From the point of view of criminal justice in Lithuania, this topic has not been investigated at all. The courts hear such criminal cases without any exceptions for doctors. However, in an international level, the judgments of the European Court of Human Rights or investigations in other states suggest that criminal liability is not always a binding legal consequence in such cases. After having analysed and summarised the case-law of the said court, by taking into account the insights of foreign authors, the danger of medical error and ultima ratio principle, the author raises the idea that the current practice in civil medical negligence when doctors are prosecuted for simple negligence should be changed.

Keywords

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