1. bookVolume 25 (2021): Edizione 2 (December 2021)
Dettagli della rivista
License
Formato
Rivista
eISSN
2344-150X
Prima pubblicazione
30 Jul 2013
Frequenza di pubblicazione
2 volte all'anno
Lingue
Inglese
access type Accesso libero

Phenolic profile and antioxidant activity of the selected edible flowers grown in Poland

Pubblicato online: 30 Dec 2021
Volume & Edizione: Volume 25 (2021) - Edizione 2 (December 2021)
Pagine: 185 - 200
Ricevuto: 15 Jul 2021
Accettato: 28 Oct 2021
Dettagli della rivista
License
Formato
Rivista
eISSN
2344-150X
Prima pubblicazione
30 Jul 2013
Frequenza di pubblicazione
2 volte all'anno
Lingue
Inglese
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine phenolic profile and antioxidant activity of the selected edible flowers grown in Poland. A significant variation was observed in the both antioxidant activity and total phenolic content. Marigold flowers were characterized by the highest total phenolic content (89.22 mg GEA/g dry weight). In turn, begonia flowers exhibited the highest total flavonoids and phenolic acids content (21.96 mg QE/g dry weight, and 8.60 mg CAE/g dry weight, respectively). Taking into account the type of flowers, begonia and marigold flowers were the richest in phenolic acids. Caffeic and p-coumaric acids were the most frequent ones in the edible flowers grown in Poland. While gallic and p-coumaric acids were the prevalent ones in terms of their content. The begonia and marigold flowers contained quercetin and kaempferol, while hesperetin and naringenin were present in the chives flowers. The marigold flowers were characterized by a particularly high content of quercetin, and also exhibited the highest total antioxidant activity. The methanolic extracts of marigold and begonia flowers were characterized by the highest antioxidant activity, reducing activity, as well as the highest ability to neutralize free radicals.

Keywords

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