Journal & Issues

Volume 44 (2023): Issue 1 (January 2023)

Volume 43 (2022): Issue 2 (June 2022)

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Volume 42 (2021): Issue s4 (September 2021)

Volume 42 (2021): Issue s3 (April 2021)

Volume 42 (2021): Issue s2 (March 2021)

Volume 42 (2021): Issue 2 (July 2021)

Volume 42 (2021): Issue s1 (March 2021)

Volume 42 (2021): Issue 1 (January 2021)

Volume 41 (2020): Issue 2 (June 2020)

Volume 41 (2020): Issue s1 (September 2020)

Volume 41 (2020): Issue 1 (January 2020)

Volume 40 (2019): Issue s2 (October 2019)

Volume 40 (2019): Issue 2 (March 2019)

Volume 40 (2019): Issue s1 (June 2019)

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Volume 39 (2018): Issue 2 (December 2018)

Volume 39 (2018): Issue 1 (May 2018)

Volume 38 (2017): Issue s2 (November 2017)

Volume 38 (2017): Issue 2 (November 2017)

Volume 38 (2017): Issue s1 (June 2017)

Volume 38 (2017): Issue 1 (June 2017)

Volume 37 (2016): Issue 2 (November 2016)

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Volume 37 (2016): Issue 1 (June 2016)

Volume 36 (2015): Issue 2 (October 2015)

Volume 36 (2015): Issue s1 (May 2015)

Volume 36 (2015): Issue 1 (June 2015)

Volume 35 (2014): Issue 2 (December 2014)

Volume 35 (2014): Issue s1 (August 2014)

Volume 35 (2014): Issue 1 (June 2014)

Volume 34 (2013): Issue 2 (November 2013)

Volume 34 (2013): Issue s1 (December 2013)

Volume 34 (2013): Issue 1 (July 2013)

Volume 33 (2012): Issue Special-Issue (December 2012)

Volume 33 (2012): Issue 2 (December 2012)

Volume 33 (2012): Issue 1 (August 2012)

Volume 32 (2011): Issue 2 (November 2011)

Volume 32 (2011): Issue 1 (June 2011)

Volume 31 (2010): Issue 2 (November 2010)

Volume 31 (2010): Issue 1 (June 2010)

Volume 30 (2009): Issue 2 (November 2009)

Volume 30 (2009): Issue 1 (June 2009)

Volume 29 (2008): Issue 2 (November 2008)

Volume 29 (2008): Issue 1 (April 2008)

Volume 28 (2007): Issue 2 (November 2007)

Volume 28 (2007): Issue 1 (May 2007)

Volume 27 (2006): Issue 2 (November 2006)

Volume 27 (2006): Issue 1 (February 2006)

Volume 26 (2005): Issue 2 (November 2005)

Volume 26 (2005): Issue 1 (May 2005)

Volume 25 (2004): Issue 1-2 (August 2004)

Volume 24 (2003): Issue 2 (November 2003)

Volume 24 (2003): Issue 1 (May 2003)

Volume 23 (2002): Issue 1-2 (September 2002)

Volume 22 (2001): Issue 2 (December 2001)

Volume 22 (2001): Issue 1 (April 2001)

Volume 21 (2000): Issue 2 (November 2000)

Volume 21 (2000): Issue 1 (February 2000)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2001-5119
First Published
01 Mar 2013
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 38 (2017): Issue 2 (November 2017)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2001-5119
First Published
01 Mar 2013
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

9 Articles
Open Access

Risk, Crisis, and Social Media: A systematic review of seven years’ research

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 1 - 17

Abstract

Abstract

The literature on social media use in risk and crisis communication is growing fast, and it is time to take stock before looking forward. A review of 200 empirical studies in the area shows how the literature is indeed increasing and focusing on particular social media plat forms, users, and phases from risk to crisis relief. However, although spanning 40 countries, a large proportion of the world’s social media users are under-represented in the research. In addition, little attention is given to the question of who is actually reached through social media, and the effects of the digital divide are rarely discussed. This article suggests that more attention is given to the questions of equal access to information and ICTs, complementary media channels, and cultural diversity.

Keywords

  • social media
  • risk communication
  • crisis communication
  • research review
  • research trends
  • digital divide
  • geographical focus
  • social media choice
  • social media users
Open Access

PR, Lobbyism and Democracy: Mapping the revolving door in Denmark from 1981 to 2015

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 19 - 31

Abstract

Abstract

The growth of PR in Scandinavia is linked both to the mediatisation of politics and to the decline of corporatism. Studies in Sweden and Norway suggest that one consequence of these changes is the increasing number of politicians who find new careers as lobbyists in the private sector. In this study, we have constructed a data set of all members of the Danish Parliament who have left politics from 1981 to 2015 (n = 613) and identified the number and type of job positions they have taken up subsequently (n = 1,094). We find that, especially from the 1990s, we can register revolving door activity. Still, 89 per cent of all the registered job positions fall outside of lobbyism. 11 per cent of the job positions fall within the wider field associated with the emerging field of policy professionals (including lobbyism), while lobbyism on its own accounts for two per cent of the job positions.

Keywords

  • mediatisation
  • corporatism
  • revolving doors
  • policy professionals
  • PR
  • lobbyism
Open Access

Media Choice Proliferation and Shifting Orientations Towards News in the United States and Norway, 1995–2012

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 33 - 49

Abstract

Abstract

Around the world, rapid media choice proliferation is empowering audiences and allowing individuals to more precisely tailor personal media use. From a democratic perspective, the relationship between the changing media environment and news use is of particular interest. This article presents a comparative exploration of citizens’ changing orientations towards local, national and international news in two very different countries, Norway and the United States, between 1995 and 2012. Prior research suggests that more media choice correlates with a decrease in news consumption. Our analysis shows a pattern of increasing specialization in news orientation in both countries. We also find that the strongest Norwegian trend is one of specialization while the strongest trend in the United States is one of disconnection. Altogether, the results illustrate how local conditions shape the effects of global technological developments.

Keywords

  • media globalization
  • news orientation
  • local news
  • international news
  • news use
  • comparative study
Open Access

Moulding Cultural Capital into Cosmopolitan Capital: Media practices as reconversion work in a globalising world

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 51 - 64

Abstract

Abstract

Various media allow people to build transnational networks, learn about the world and meet people from other cultures. In other words, media may allow one to cultivate cosmopolitan capital, defined here as a distinct form of embodied cultural capital. However, far from everyone is identifying this potential. Analyses of a national survey and in-depth interviews, conducted in Sweden, disclose a tendency among those in possession of cultural capital to recognise and exploit cosmopolitan capital in their media practices. Those who are dispossessed of cultural capital are significantly less liable to approach media in this way. Relying on various media practices in order to reshape one’s cultural capital exemplifies what Bourdieu called a reconversion strategy. As social fields undergo globalisation, media offer opportunities for the privileged to remain privileged – to change in order to conserve.

Keywords

  • cultural capital
  • cosmopolitan capital
  • media practices
  • Bourdieu
  • media use
Open Access

Performing the Self in the Mainstream: Norwegian girls in blogging

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 65 - 78

Abstract

Abstract

Blogging has become an integral part of girls’ media culture in Norway. This article investigates how teenage girls in the mainstream blogging community perform selves in their blogs over time. While studies of girls’ self-presentations online abound, most draw solely on analyses of online artefacts and lack a temporal perspective. To address these gaps, this investigation has employed a longitudinal design combining in-depth interviews with ethnographic content analyses of blogs, and has analysed girls’ online-based performances of self as integral to their offline experiences framed by the wider cultural context and gendered discourses. This approach is fruitful because it acknowledges girls’ changing experiences across time and contexts, thus making possible a contribution to the theorization of identity as performed across the online and the offline settings and interactions in an ongoing process.

Keywords

  • girl culture
  • identity
  • online/offline
Open Access

Sustainable Oil and Profitable Wind: The communication of corporate responsibilities as inverted positioning

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 79 - 96

Abstract

Abstract

Companies are confronted with differing public perceptions, which influence the way in which they present their social and environmental responsibilities. Our qualitative study compares the online responsibility communication of two companies from the energy sector: Shell, representing the controversial but profitable oil industry; and Vestas, representing the sustainable wind industry, the financial competitiveness of which is sometimes called into question. The website analysis reveals that both companies engage in inverted positioning. They invert perceived weaknesses into strengths: Shell highlights its social and environmental responsibilities, whereas Vestas, instead of capitalising on its potential as a CSR brand, highlights its economic responsibility. Theoretically, we integrate inverted positioning into a constitutive process model of responsibility communication. Inverted positioning might lead either to a reputational downward spiral, making a company less credible in the longer term, or the public communication of contested responsibilities functions as a self-imposed ambition that can, over time, induce substantial corporate learning processes.

Keywords

  • aspirational talk
  • brownwashing
  • CCO – Communication Constitutes Organisations
  • controversial industries
  • corporate social responsibility
  • environmental communication
Open Access

Childhood and Children’s Retrospective Media Consumption Experiences: The case of Norway

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 97 - 112

Abstract

Abstract

The focus in this article is on childhood and consumer culture with a special view on children’s media experiences retrospective. A historical perspective is applied as history provides an opportunity to reflect on changing processes within contemporary consumer culture, especially with a view on exploring how children grew up within a Norwegian context with the tradition of state regulated media. The following main research question is addressed: What are the dominant narratives on retrospective media experiences (radio and television)? The findings are based on a case study of adults reflecting on media consumption. Their experiences have been collected through focus group interviews as this approach can generate new insights into former experiences and contemporary childhood. The study shows that narratives on childhood in retrospective media experiences are influenced by both contemporary notions of childhood and the new media flow.

Keywords

  • regulation
  • radio and television experiences
  • Norway
  • childhood
  • media generations
Open Access

Ordinary People on Television: A longitudinal study of Swedish Television, 1982–2011

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 113 - 129

Abstract

Abstract

By using a longitudinal design and measuring television content and the occurrence of ordinary television and ‘ordinary’ participants at four different points in time from 1982 to 2011, this study investigates the alleged shift towards ordinariness in the 1990s. Using Sweden as a test case, three research questions are posed: To what extent did ordinary television programming increase during the 1990s? To what extent did the participation of ordinary people increase as a consequence of this shift? To what extent has public service television adapted to commercial competition through broadcasting more ordinary television? The analysis confirms the alleged shift towards ordinariness. Ordinary television and ordinary participants did increase during the studied era, but a key argument put forward is that this shift occurred gradually and that one should avoid using overdramatic epithets to characterise it. The results also suggest that the public service broadcaster (SVT) also moved towards ordinariness but that this change was modest and occurred later than expected in Sweden.

Keywords

  • broadcasting
  • commercial competition
  • democratisation
  • participation
  • public service
  • reality television
  • television history
Open Access

Book Reviews

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 131 - 142

Abstract

9 Articles
Open Access

Risk, Crisis, and Social Media: A systematic review of seven years’ research

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 1 - 17

Abstract

Abstract

The literature on social media use in risk and crisis communication is growing fast, and it is time to take stock before looking forward. A review of 200 empirical studies in the area shows how the literature is indeed increasing and focusing on particular social media plat forms, users, and phases from risk to crisis relief. However, although spanning 40 countries, a large proportion of the world’s social media users are under-represented in the research. In addition, little attention is given to the question of who is actually reached through social media, and the effects of the digital divide are rarely discussed. This article suggests that more attention is given to the questions of equal access to information and ICTs, complementary media channels, and cultural diversity.

Keywords

  • social media
  • risk communication
  • crisis communication
  • research review
  • research trends
  • digital divide
  • geographical focus
  • social media choice
  • social media users
Open Access

PR, Lobbyism and Democracy: Mapping the revolving door in Denmark from 1981 to 2015

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 19 - 31

Abstract

Abstract

The growth of PR in Scandinavia is linked both to the mediatisation of politics and to the decline of corporatism. Studies in Sweden and Norway suggest that one consequence of these changes is the increasing number of politicians who find new careers as lobbyists in the private sector. In this study, we have constructed a data set of all members of the Danish Parliament who have left politics from 1981 to 2015 (n = 613) and identified the number and type of job positions they have taken up subsequently (n = 1,094). We find that, especially from the 1990s, we can register revolving door activity. Still, 89 per cent of all the registered job positions fall outside of lobbyism. 11 per cent of the job positions fall within the wider field associated with the emerging field of policy professionals (including lobbyism), while lobbyism on its own accounts for two per cent of the job positions.

Keywords

  • mediatisation
  • corporatism
  • revolving doors
  • policy professionals
  • PR
  • lobbyism
Open Access

Media Choice Proliferation and Shifting Orientations Towards News in the United States and Norway, 1995–2012

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 33 - 49

Abstract

Abstract

Around the world, rapid media choice proliferation is empowering audiences and allowing individuals to more precisely tailor personal media use. From a democratic perspective, the relationship between the changing media environment and news use is of particular interest. This article presents a comparative exploration of citizens’ changing orientations towards local, national and international news in two very different countries, Norway and the United States, between 1995 and 2012. Prior research suggests that more media choice correlates with a decrease in news consumption. Our analysis shows a pattern of increasing specialization in news orientation in both countries. We also find that the strongest Norwegian trend is one of specialization while the strongest trend in the United States is one of disconnection. Altogether, the results illustrate how local conditions shape the effects of global technological developments.

Keywords

  • media globalization
  • news orientation
  • local news
  • international news
  • news use
  • comparative study
Open Access

Moulding Cultural Capital into Cosmopolitan Capital: Media practices as reconversion work in a globalising world

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 51 - 64

Abstract

Abstract

Various media allow people to build transnational networks, learn about the world and meet people from other cultures. In other words, media may allow one to cultivate cosmopolitan capital, defined here as a distinct form of embodied cultural capital. However, far from everyone is identifying this potential. Analyses of a national survey and in-depth interviews, conducted in Sweden, disclose a tendency among those in possession of cultural capital to recognise and exploit cosmopolitan capital in their media practices. Those who are dispossessed of cultural capital are significantly less liable to approach media in this way. Relying on various media practices in order to reshape one’s cultural capital exemplifies what Bourdieu called a reconversion strategy. As social fields undergo globalisation, media offer opportunities for the privileged to remain privileged – to change in order to conserve.

Keywords

  • cultural capital
  • cosmopolitan capital
  • media practices
  • Bourdieu
  • media use
Open Access

Performing the Self in the Mainstream: Norwegian girls in blogging

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 65 - 78

Abstract

Abstract

Blogging has become an integral part of girls’ media culture in Norway. This article investigates how teenage girls in the mainstream blogging community perform selves in their blogs over time. While studies of girls’ self-presentations online abound, most draw solely on analyses of online artefacts and lack a temporal perspective. To address these gaps, this investigation has employed a longitudinal design combining in-depth interviews with ethnographic content analyses of blogs, and has analysed girls’ online-based performances of self as integral to their offline experiences framed by the wider cultural context and gendered discourses. This approach is fruitful because it acknowledges girls’ changing experiences across time and contexts, thus making possible a contribution to the theorization of identity as performed across the online and the offline settings and interactions in an ongoing process.

Keywords

  • girl culture
  • identity
  • online/offline
Open Access

Sustainable Oil and Profitable Wind: The communication of corporate responsibilities as inverted positioning

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 79 - 96

Abstract

Abstract

Companies are confronted with differing public perceptions, which influence the way in which they present their social and environmental responsibilities. Our qualitative study compares the online responsibility communication of two companies from the energy sector: Shell, representing the controversial but profitable oil industry; and Vestas, representing the sustainable wind industry, the financial competitiveness of which is sometimes called into question. The website analysis reveals that both companies engage in inverted positioning. They invert perceived weaknesses into strengths: Shell highlights its social and environmental responsibilities, whereas Vestas, instead of capitalising on its potential as a CSR brand, highlights its economic responsibility. Theoretically, we integrate inverted positioning into a constitutive process model of responsibility communication. Inverted positioning might lead either to a reputational downward spiral, making a company less credible in the longer term, or the public communication of contested responsibilities functions as a self-imposed ambition that can, over time, induce substantial corporate learning processes.

Keywords

  • aspirational talk
  • brownwashing
  • CCO – Communication Constitutes Organisations
  • controversial industries
  • corporate social responsibility
  • environmental communication
Open Access

Childhood and Children’s Retrospective Media Consumption Experiences: The case of Norway

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 97 - 112

Abstract

Abstract

The focus in this article is on childhood and consumer culture with a special view on children’s media experiences retrospective. A historical perspective is applied as history provides an opportunity to reflect on changing processes within contemporary consumer culture, especially with a view on exploring how children grew up within a Norwegian context with the tradition of state regulated media. The following main research question is addressed: What are the dominant narratives on retrospective media experiences (radio and television)? The findings are based on a case study of adults reflecting on media consumption. Their experiences have been collected through focus group interviews as this approach can generate new insights into former experiences and contemporary childhood. The study shows that narratives on childhood in retrospective media experiences are influenced by both contemporary notions of childhood and the new media flow.

Keywords

  • regulation
  • radio and television experiences
  • Norway
  • childhood
  • media generations
Open Access

Ordinary People on Television: A longitudinal study of Swedish Television, 1982–2011

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 113 - 129

Abstract

Abstract

By using a longitudinal design and measuring television content and the occurrence of ordinary television and ‘ordinary’ participants at four different points in time from 1982 to 2011, this study investigates the alleged shift towards ordinariness in the 1990s. Using Sweden as a test case, three research questions are posed: To what extent did ordinary television programming increase during the 1990s? To what extent did the participation of ordinary people increase as a consequence of this shift? To what extent has public service television adapted to commercial competition through broadcasting more ordinary television? The analysis confirms the alleged shift towards ordinariness. Ordinary television and ordinary participants did increase during the studied era, but a key argument put forward is that this shift occurred gradually and that one should avoid using overdramatic epithets to characterise it. The results also suggest that the public service broadcaster (SVT) also moved towards ordinariness but that this change was modest and occurred later than expected in Sweden.

Keywords

  • broadcasting
  • commercial competition
  • democratisation
  • participation
  • public service
  • reality television
  • television history
Open Access

Book Reviews

Published Online: 08 Dec 2017
Page range: 131 - 142

Abstract

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