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Volume 5 (2022): Issue 1 (April 2022)

Volume 4 (2017): Issue 3 (October 2017)

Volume 4 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 4 (2017): Issue 1 (January 2017)

Volume 3 (2016): Issue 4 (October 2016)

Volume 3 (2016): Issue 3 (July 2016)

Volume 3 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 3 (2016): Issue 1 (January 2016)

Volume 2 (2015): Issue 4 (October 2015)

Volume 2 (2015): Issue 3 (July 2015)

Volume 2 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 2 (2015): Issue 1 (January 2015)

Volume 1 (2014): Issue 1 (October 2014)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2049-7156
First Published
15 Mar 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 4 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2049-7156
First Published
15 Mar 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

1 Articles
Open Access

Conceptualising English as a global contact language

Published Online: 29 Dec 2017
Page range: 31 - 49

Abstract

Abstract

English as a global contact language has been conceptualised as (1) geo-localised Englishes, (2) English similects, and (3) transcultural multi-lingua franca. Although taking a simplified and reified approach, the first framework of geo-localised Englishes has contributed to raising awareness of global diversity in English use and corresponding innovative classroom practices. Meanwhile, the second framework of English similects has taken a lingua franca approach between different first-language (L1) users, and provided insight into omnipresent multilingualism across interactants beyond particular speech communities. However, from a complexity theory perspective, geo-local communities and interactants’ L1s are just among many complex social systems, and thus neither the first nor the second framework is capable of fully explaining what emerges from communication through the language in question. The third framework of transcultural multi-lingua franca seeks to comprehend the full range of multilingualism, or broadly conceptualised translanguaging with multiple ‘languages’, which emerges across individuals, time and space. It also takes notice of both the border-transgressing nature of culture and the possible transience of salient cultural categories in global communication. Furthermore, this last framework suggests that English language education in the 21st century take a multilingual, transcultural and post-normative turn.

Keywords

  • world Englishes (WE)
  • English as a Lingua Franca (ELF)
  • English similects
  • multilingualism
  • translanguaging
  • intercultural/transcultural communication
  • complexity theory
1 Articles
Open Access

Conceptualising English as a global contact language

Published Online: 29 Dec 2017
Page range: 31 - 49

Abstract

Abstract

English as a global contact language has been conceptualised as (1) geo-localised Englishes, (2) English similects, and (3) transcultural multi-lingua franca. Although taking a simplified and reified approach, the first framework of geo-localised Englishes has contributed to raising awareness of global diversity in English use and corresponding innovative classroom practices. Meanwhile, the second framework of English similects has taken a lingua franca approach between different first-language (L1) users, and provided insight into omnipresent multilingualism across interactants beyond particular speech communities. However, from a complexity theory perspective, geo-local communities and interactants’ L1s are just among many complex social systems, and thus neither the first nor the second framework is capable of fully explaining what emerges from communication through the language in question. The third framework of transcultural multi-lingua franca seeks to comprehend the full range of multilingualism, or broadly conceptualised translanguaging with multiple ‘languages’, which emerges across individuals, time and space. It also takes notice of both the border-transgressing nature of culture and the possible transience of salient cultural categories in global communication. Furthermore, this last framework suggests that English language education in the 21st century take a multilingual, transcultural and post-normative turn.

Keywords

  • world Englishes (WE)
  • English as a Lingua Franca (ELF)
  • English similects
  • multilingualism
  • translanguaging
  • intercultural/transcultural communication
  • complexity theory

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