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Volume 18 (2020): Issue 1 (October 2020)

Volume 17 (2019): Issue 1 (October 2019)

Volume 16 (2019): Issue 1 (August 2019)

Volume 15 (2018): Issue 1 (October 2018)

Volume 14 (2017): Issue 1 (December 2017)

Volume 13 (2016): Issue 1 (December 2016)

Volume 12 (2016): Issue 1 (September 2016)

Volume 11 (2015): Issue 1 (December 2015)

Volume 10 (2015): Issue 1 (August 2015)

Volume 9 (2014): Issue 1 (December 2014)

Volume 8 (2014): Issue 1 (September 2014)

Volume 7 (2013): Issue 1 (November 2013)

Volume 6 (2013): Issue 1 (August 2013)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2066-7779
First Published
04 Jun 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 17 (2019): Issue 1 (October 2019)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2066-7779
First Published
04 Jun 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

11 Articles
access type Open Access

Blur

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 9 - 22

Abstract

Abstract

Keynote talk given at the conference Intermediality Now: Remapping In-Betweenness, organized at Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania, in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, between 19–20 October 2018, within the framework of the exploratory research project PN-III-ID-PCE-2016-0418, funded by the UEFISCDI (Executive Unit for Financing Higher Education, Research, Development and Innovation).

Keywords

  • poor images
  • formlessness
  • images haunted by another medium
access type Open Access

From Paragone to Symbiosis. Sensations of In-Betweenness in Sally Potter’s The Tango Lesson

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 23 - 44

Abstract

Abstract

Sally Potter’s The Tango Lesson (1997), an homage to the Argentine tango, situated in-between autobiography and fiction, creates multiple passages between art and life, the corporeal and the spiritual, emotional involvement and professional detachment. The romance story of filmmaker Sally Potter and dancer Pablo Verón is also readable as an allegory of interart relations, a dialogue of the gaze and the image, a process evolving from paragone to symbiosis. Relying on the strategies of dancefilm elaborated by Erin Brannigan (2011), the paper examines the intermedial relationship between film and dance in their cine-choreographic entanglement. Across scenes overflowing with passion, the film’s haptic imagery is reinforced by the black-and-white photographic image and culminates in a tableau moment that foregrounds the manifold sensations of in-betweenness and feeling of “otherness” that the protagonists experience, caught in-between languages, cultures, and arts.1

Keywords

  • Sally Potter
  • dancefilm
  • intermediality
  • cine-choreography
  • in-betweenness
access type Open Access

In-Between Images: Where is the Ground?

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 45 - 61

Abstract

Abstract

Joan Jonas’s large survey exhibition at Tate Modern (2018) highlighted the contemporary relevance of this pioneer of performance art in her juxtapositions of analogue and virtual methods. Her process often relies on a ground or stage where physical remnants of her performances are tangible. Drawing from these insights and exploring figure-ground relations through a selection of works by various artists and filmmakers, this article aims to challenge Hito Steyerl’s polemic that we might not need a ground within contemporary virtual image worlds. The consideration of case studies will be informed by philosophical reflections as to the relevance and scope of the idea of ground within the post-digital era.

Keywords

  • Figure-ground
  • intermediality
  • performance art
  • installation
  • post-digital
access type Open Access

Intermediality of Screens in Post-Media Assemblages

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 63 - 80

Abstract

Abstract

In contemporary artworks of so-called post-media assemblage, screens can be argued to emphasize, interconnect and rearticulate relationships between various parts in various modalities of image-making and display. They can be understood to produce gesturality that maintains conditions of mediality, which is the sustenance of relations between different parts of the media ensemble. This paper is an attempt to understand screens by analysing the gesturality that they propagate and not just facilitate. For this purpose, the paper interrogates the intermediality of screens in contemporary media arts that rely on this gesturality. By closely analysing contemporary media art installations such as Solar Reserve (Tonopah, Nevada) (John Gerrard, 2014) and Shadow 3 (Shilpa Gupta, 2007), this paper elaborates a concept of intermediality as an unfixed state and describes in-betweenness as enabling an openness to continuously form, unform and deform relations with different entities, thereby producing a gestural modality.

Keywords

  • screens
  • post-media assemblage
  • gesturality
  • intermediality
access type Open Access

Television and Video Screens in Filmic Narratives: Medium Specificity, Noise and Frame-Work

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 81 - 96

Abstract

Abstract

The paper discusses pertinent aspects of the screen as a device of framing and re-ordering. Television and video screens introduced in filmic diegesis are attributed three main functions (spatial, temporal, and topical re-ordering) and are related to the relationships Gerard Genette establishes between first-order narrative and metadiegetic levels (1987), as well as to Lars Elleström’s extracommunicational and intracommunicational actual and virtual spheres (2018). The visibility through noise of the televisual and of the video media is theorized based on Sybille Krämer’s media theory (2015) and three pre-digital arthouse films: Videodrome (David Cronenberg, 1984), Irma Vep (Olivier Assayas, 1996), and Lost Highway (David Lynch, 1997).1

Keywords

  • cinematic screen
  • electronic screen
  • diegesis
  • noise
  • narrative levels
access type Open Access

Veterans and Grannies. The Polyphony of Memory in Two Hungarian Documentary Films

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 97 - 114

Abstract

Abstract

The essay analyses the representation of polyphonic memory in two groundbreaking Hungarian documentary films, made thirty years apart: János and Gyula Gulyás’s I was at the Isonzo, too (Én is jártam Isonzónál, 1984–87) and Bálint Révész’s Granny Project (Nagyi projekt, 2017). The earlier film was made in the 1980s, under the state-socialist system, when doing memory work of both World Wars was limited, if not forbidden. The second film was made recently, in 2017. They differ from each other in many ways, but instinctively they chose the same solution for representing and working out traumas: through transnational dialogue. They focus on traumatic experiences of the past, changing national, so-called monologic memory into a broad perspective, putting Aleida Assmann’s (2005) theory of dialogic memory into practice.1

Keywords

  • First World War
  • Second World War
  • Holocaust
  • polyphonic memory
  • dialogic memory
  • sense memory
access type Open Access

Shakespeare and the Accumulation of Cultural Prestige in Video Games

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 115 - 128

Abstract

Abstract

The present article analyses the manner in which AAA action-adventure games adapt, quote, and reference Shakespeare’s plays in order to borrow the bard’s cultural capital and assert themselves as forms of art. My analysis focuses on three major releases: Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots, BioShock: Infinite, and God of War. The article shows that these games employ narrative content from Shakespeare’s plays in order to adopt traits traditionally associated with the established arts, such as narrative depth and complex characters. In addition to this, explicit intertextual links between the games’ respective storyworlds and the plays are offered as ludic rewards for the more involved players who thoroughly explore game space.1

Keywords

  • Shakespeare
  • remediation
  • video games
  • action-adventure
  • cultural capital
  • cultural prestige
access type Open Access

In-Betweenness and Interactional Presence in Adrian Sitaru’s VR Play, Illegitimate

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 131 - 142

Abstract

Abstract

This paper will present the role of the loops and the peculiarities of the mixed reality experience in the case of the performance of Illegitimate (stage adaptation by Adrian Sitaru, based on an original text by Adrian Sitaru and Alina Grigore). The author argues that the loops, defined by Manovich as “a new narrative form appropriate for the computer age” are also the key for the possible reality switches and joinings.

Keywords

  • VR technology in theatre
  • presence
  • immersion
  • in-betweenness
access type Open Access

Sending Shivers Down the Spine. VR Productions as Seamed Media

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 143 - 156

Abstract

Abstract

According to Rebecca Rouse’s concept of “media of attraction” (2016), the mediums of virtual reality have four characteristics: they are participatory, interdisciplinary, unassimilated and seamed. The author’s hypothesis is that even though 360-degree films and virtual reality experiences as seamed mediums are remediating the medium of film, they have the characteristics of the medium of live performance. She points out that the characteristics of performance art based on Fischer-Lichte’s taxonomy (2008), such as liveness and co-presence, are influencing the development of 360-degree films and virtual reality experiences. As an argument, she analyses three virtual reality productions created by performing artists, which operate with the specificity of intermediality and the longing for immersion, the main characteristic of virtual reality. These productions lean on the immediacy characteristics of the medium of film and performance by using cut-scenes, linear narratives, live streaming, but also by including the “human interface,” i.e., the actor, who ensures a higher level of absorption.1

Keywords

  • virtual reality
  • immersion
  • performing arts
  • liveness
  • intermediality
access type Open Access

VR as a Narcissistic Medium

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 157 - 167

Abstract

access type Open Access

Performativity and Worldmaking

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 169 - 178

Abstract

11 Articles
access type Open Access

Blur

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 9 - 22

Abstract

Abstract

Keynote talk given at the conference Intermediality Now: Remapping In-Betweenness, organized at Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania, in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, between 19–20 October 2018, within the framework of the exploratory research project PN-III-ID-PCE-2016-0418, funded by the UEFISCDI (Executive Unit for Financing Higher Education, Research, Development and Innovation).

Keywords

  • poor images
  • formlessness
  • images haunted by another medium
access type Open Access

From Paragone to Symbiosis. Sensations of In-Betweenness in Sally Potter’s The Tango Lesson

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 23 - 44

Abstract

Abstract

Sally Potter’s The Tango Lesson (1997), an homage to the Argentine tango, situated in-between autobiography and fiction, creates multiple passages between art and life, the corporeal and the spiritual, emotional involvement and professional detachment. The romance story of filmmaker Sally Potter and dancer Pablo Verón is also readable as an allegory of interart relations, a dialogue of the gaze and the image, a process evolving from paragone to symbiosis. Relying on the strategies of dancefilm elaborated by Erin Brannigan (2011), the paper examines the intermedial relationship between film and dance in their cine-choreographic entanglement. Across scenes overflowing with passion, the film’s haptic imagery is reinforced by the black-and-white photographic image and culminates in a tableau moment that foregrounds the manifold sensations of in-betweenness and feeling of “otherness” that the protagonists experience, caught in-between languages, cultures, and arts.1

Keywords

  • Sally Potter
  • dancefilm
  • intermediality
  • cine-choreography
  • in-betweenness
access type Open Access

In-Between Images: Where is the Ground?

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 45 - 61

Abstract

Abstract

Joan Jonas’s large survey exhibition at Tate Modern (2018) highlighted the contemporary relevance of this pioneer of performance art in her juxtapositions of analogue and virtual methods. Her process often relies on a ground or stage where physical remnants of her performances are tangible. Drawing from these insights and exploring figure-ground relations through a selection of works by various artists and filmmakers, this article aims to challenge Hito Steyerl’s polemic that we might not need a ground within contemporary virtual image worlds. The consideration of case studies will be informed by philosophical reflections as to the relevance and scope of the idea of ground within the post-digital era.

Keywords

  • Figure-ground
  • intermediality
  • performance art
  • installation
  • post-digital
access type Open Access

Intermediality of Screens in Post-Media Assemblages

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 63 - 80

Abstract

Abstract

In contemporary artworks of so-called post-media assemblage, screens can be argued to emphasize, interconnect and rearticulate relationships between various parts in various modalities of image-making and display. They can be understood to produce gesturality that maintains conditions of mediality, which is the sustenance of relations between different parts of the media ensemble. This paper is an attempt to understand screens by analysing the gesturality that they propagate and not just facilitate. For this purpose, the paper interrogates the intermediality of screens in contemporary media arts that rely on this gesturality. By closely analysing contemporary media art installations such as Solar Reserve (Tonopah, Nevada) (John Gerrard, 2014) and Shadow 3 (Shilpa Gupta, 2007), this paper elaborates a concept of intermediality as an unfixed state and describes in-betweenness as enabling an openness to continuously form, unform and deform relations with different entities, thereby producing a gestural modality.

Keywords

  • screens
  • post-media assemblage
  • gesturality
  • intermediality
access type Open Access

Television and Video Screens in Filmic Narratives: Medium Specificity, Noise and Frame-Work

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 81 - 96

Abstract

Abstract

The paper discusses pertinent aspects of the screen as a device of framing and re-ordering. Television and video screens introduced in filmic diegesis are attributed three main functions (spatial, temporal, and topical re-ordering) and are related to the relationships Gerard Genette establishes between first-order narrative and metadiegetic levels (1987), as well as to Lars Elleström’s extracommunicational and intracommunicational actual and virtual spheres (2018). The visibility through noise of the televisual and of the video media is theorized based on Sybille Krämer’s media theory (2015) and three pre-digital arthouse films: Videodrome (David Cronenberg, 1984), Irma Vep (Olivier Assayas, 1996), and Lost Highway (David Lynch, 1997).1

Keywords

  • cinematic screen
  • electronic screen
  • diegesis
  • noise
  • narrative levels
access type Open Access

Veterans and Grannies. The Polyphony of Memory in Two Hungarian Documentary Films

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 97 - 114

Abstract

Abstract

The essay analyses the representation of polyphonic memory in two groundbreaking Hungarian documentary films, made thirty years apart: János and Gyula Gulyás’s I was at the Isonzo, too (Én is jártam Isonzónál, 1984–87) and Bálint Révész’s Granny Project (Nagyi projekt, 2017). The earlier film was made in the 1980s, under the state-socialist system, when doing memory work of both World Wars was limited, if not forbidden. The second film was made recently, in 2017. They differ from each other in many ways, but instinctively they chose the same solution for representing and working out traumas: through transnational dialogue. They focus on traumatic experiences of the past, changing national, so-called monologic memory into a broad perspective, putting Aleida Assmann’s (2005) theory of dialogic memory into practice.1

Keywords

  • First World War
  • Second World War
  • Holocaust
  • polyphonic memory
  • dialogic memory
  • sense memory
access type Open Access

Shakespeare and the Accumulation of Cultural Prestige in Video Games

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 115 - 128

Abstract

Abstract

The present article analyses the manner in which AAA action-adventure games adapt, quote, and reference Shakespeare’s plays in order to borrow the bard’s cultural capital and assert themselves as forms of art. My analysis focuses on three major releases: Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots, BioShock: Infinite, and God of War. The article shows that these games employ narrative content from Shakespeare’s plays in order to adopt traits traditionally associated with the established arts, such as narrative depth and complex characters. In addition to this, explicit intertextual links between the games’ respective storyworlds and the plays are offered as ludic rewards for the more involved players who thoroughly explore game space.1

Keywords

  • Shakespeare
  • remediation
  • video games
  • action-adventure
  • cultural capital
  • cultural prestige
access type Open Access

In-Betweenness and Interactional Presence in Adrian Sitaru’s VR Play, Illegitimate

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 131 - 142

Abstract

Abstract

This paper will present the role of the loops and the peculiarities of the mixed reality experience in the case of the performance of Illegitimate (stage adaptation by Adrian Sitaru, based on an original text by Adrian Sitaru and Alina Grigore). The author argues that the loops, defined by Manovich as “a new narrative form appropriate for the computer age” are also the key for the possible reality switches and joinings.

Keywords

  • VR technology in theatre
  • presence
  • immersion
  • in-betweenness
access type Open Access

Sending Shivers Down the Spine. VR Productions as Seamed Media

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 143 - 156

Abstract

Abstract

According to Rebecca Rouse’s concept of “media of attraction” (2016), the mediums of virtual reality have four characteristics: they are participatory, interdisciplinary, unassimilated and seamed. The author’s hypothesis is that even though 360-degree films and virtual reality experiences as seamed mediums are remediating the medium of film, they have the characteristics of the medium of live performance. She points out that the characteristics of performance art based on Fischer-Lichte’s taxonomy (2008), such as liveness and co-presence, are influencing the development of 360-degree films and virtual reality experiences. As an argument, she analyses three virtual reality productions created by performing artists, which operate with the specificity of intermediality and the longing for immersion, the main characteristic of virtual reality. These productions lean on the immediacy characteristics of the medium of film and performance by using cut-scenes, linear narratives, live streaming, but also by including the “human interface,” i.e., the actor, who ensures a higher level of absorption.1

Keywords

  • virtual reality
  • immersion
  • performing arts
  • liveness
  • intermediality
access type Open Access

VR as a Narcissistic Medium

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 157 - 167

Abstract

access type Open Access

Performativity and Worldmaking

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 169 - 178

Abstract

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