1. bookVolume 23 (2009): Edition 4 (May 2009)
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Investigation of Tobacco Pyrolysis Gases and Puff-by-puff Resolved Cigarette Smoke by Single Photon Ionisation (SPI) - Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS)

Publié en ligne: 30 Dec 2014
Volume & Edition: Volume 23 (2009) - Edition 4 (May 2009)
Pages: 203 - 226
Reçu: 10 Sep 2007
Accepté: 04 Dec 2008
Détails du magazine
License
Format
Magazine
eISSN
2719-9509
Première parution
01 Jan 1992
Périodicité
4 fois par an
Langues
Anglais

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