Revista y Edición

Volumen 20 (2022): Edición 5 (December 2022)
Doctoral Supplement. Postgraduate Research in Contemporary Evangelical Higher Education: Academic Perspectives on Variegated Theological and Historical Topics. Edición Editor: Marcel V. Măcelaru

Volumen 20 (2022): Edición 4 (December 2022)
Miscellaneous Theological Investigations. From Economy, Literature, and Hermeneutics to Christology, Exegesis, and Typology. Edición Editor: Corneliu C. Simuț

Volumen 20 (2022): Edición 3 (July 2022)
A Multi-Angle Examination of C. S. Lewis's Till We Have Faces. Theological, Philosophical, Ethical, and Literary Insights from one of Lewis's Greatest Novels. Edición Editor: Zachary Breitenbach

Volumen 20 (2022): Edición 2 (June 2022)
Reform according to Right Law: the Use of Legal Tradition in Reformation Theology. Edición Editor: André A. Gazal

Volumen 20 (2022): Edición 1 (March 2022)
Confessing the Trinity. The Trinitarianism of Particular Baptists, 1640s-1840s. Edición Editor: Michael A. G. Haykin

Volumen 19 (2021): Edición 4 (December 2021)
Miscellaneous Theological Studies: Biblical, Apologetic, Historical, Patristic, Theodicean, and Systematic. Edición Editor: Corneliu C. Simuţ

Volumen 19 (2021): Edición 3 (July 2021)
Islam and Islamism. The Challenge for Modern Liberal Democracies. Edición Editors: Raphael Lataster, Rumy Hasan

Volumen 19 (2021): Edición 2 (June 2021)
Fundamental Aspects of Christological Anthropology: Theological and Philosophical Perspectives in Contemporary Debates. Editor: Christopher G. Woznicki

Volumen 19 (2021): Edición 1 (March 2021)
Revivalism in Central European Protestantism, 1840-1940: Hungarian Calvinists, British Evangelicals & German-Austrian Pietists during the Spiritual Renewal of Protestant Churches in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Editor: Ábraham Kovács

Volumen 18 (2020): Edición 6 (December 2020)
The Catholic Reformation. Ecclesiology, Justification, Freedom, Sin, Grace & the Council of Trent. Editor: Eduardo J. Echeverria

Volumen 18 (2020): Edición 5 (October 2020)
Roman Catholic, Reformed Catholic and Evangelical Protestant. Reformation Edicións Five Hundred Years Later. Editor: Edición editor: Joshua R. Farris

Volumen 18 (2020): Edición 4 (August 2020)
Edición 4 (Aug 2020): From Paris to Tortosa, via Barcelona (1240-1413), Characters, Edicións and Problems in Medieval Jewish-Christian Disputations. Editor: Francesco Bianchi

Volumen 18 (2020): Edición 3 (July 2020)
In the Footsteps of the Divine Artist. On the Religious and Spiritual Dimension in Art. Editors: Wessel Stoker and Frank G. Bosman

Volumen 18 (2020): Edición 2 (June 2020)
De Corpore – ‘On the Body’ through the History of Idea, Views of the Body in Philosophy, Literature and Religion. Editor: Ramona Simuț

Volumen 18 (2020): Edición 1 (March 2020)
Baptist and Reformed Theologies of Vision and Deification (2). Constructive Edicións in Contemporary Research. Editors: Joshua R. Farris and Ryan A. Brandt

Volumen 17 (2019): Edición 4 (December 2019)
Patristic Thought in Byzantine and Protestant Theology. From Gregory Palamas and George Pachymeres to Luther, Calvin, Anglicans, and Anabaptists. Editor: Andre A. Gazal

Volumen 17 (2019): Edición 3 (July 2019)
Contemporary Evangelicals on Carl F. H. Henry’s Theology. From Philosophy, Evangelism, and Apologetics to Education, History, and Practice. Editor: Robert W. Talley

Volumen 17 (2019): Edición s2 (July 2019)
Single Author Supplement 2: The Background and Nature of the Dissensions in 1 Corinthians 1-4. Apollos' Role and Paul's Response. Author: Corin Mihăilă

Volumen 17 (2019): Edición 2 (June 2019)
Baptist and Reformed Theologies of Vision and Deification. Editors: Joshua R. Farris and Ryan A. Brandt

Volumen 17 (2019): Edición 1 (March 2019)
The Father, Son, and Spirit in Early Christian Theology, Second Century Examples. Editor: Paul A. Hartog

Volumen 17 (2019): Edición s1 (January 2019)
Single Author Supplement 1: Theological Patterns in Reformation Thought. English, American, and Scottish Protestants on Christ, Revival, and the Covenant. Author: Dinu Moga

Volumen 16 (2018): Edición 4 (December 2018)
Tome huitième: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1518-2018. Contemporary Perspectives on History and Theology in British Baptist Thought. Scottish and English Baptists on Salvation, Politics, and the End of Times. Edición editor: Alasdair Black

Volumen 16 (2018): Edición 3 (July 2018)
Tome septieme: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1518-2018. Teaching Leaders, Leading Teachers. Biblical and Historical Perspectives on Education and Leadership: Jeffrey M. Horner Edición editor: Jeffrey M. Horner

Volumen 16 (2018): Edición 2 (June 2018)
Tome sixième: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1518-2018. Contemporary Perspectives on Molinism. Theories, Responses to Objections, and Applications, Edición editor: Kirk R. MacGregor

Volumen 16 (2018): Edición 1 (April 2018)
Tome cinquième: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1518-2018. Insights into Contemporary Baptist Thought. Perspectives on European Baptist Theology and History, Edición editor: Toivo Pilli

Volumen 15 (2017): Edición 4 (December 2017)
Special Edición: Tome quatrieme: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1517-2017. Investigating the Magisterial Reformation and Its Radical Contenders. Contemporary Evangelicals on Reformation Research: from Lutheranism and Zwinglianism to Anabaptism and Baptism, Edición Editor: Marvin Jones

Volumen 15 (2017): Edición 3 (October 2017)
Special Edición: Tome troisième: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1517-2017. Theologizing about Spirituality, Pedagogy, and Soteriology. Miscellanea Antiqua, Medievalia, Reformatorica & Moderna by Corneliu Simuț

Volumen 15 (2017): Edición 2 (July 2017)
Special Edición: : Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1517-2017. ‘On the Soul’ through the History of Ideas. Views of the Soul in Philosophy, Literature & Relivion by Ramona Simuț

Volumen 15 (2017): Edición 1 (May 2017)
Edición title: Tome premier: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation: 1517-2017. Anthologizing History, the Bible, and Theology. Miscellanea Celtica, Humanistica & Reformatorica by Thomas O’Loughlin and Corneliu C. Simuț

Volumen 14 (2016): Edición 3 (December 2016)
Avant-Premiere: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1517-2017. Contemporary Perspectives on Reformed Orthodoxy. Reformed Confessions, Scholastic Thought, and Puritan Divinity in Post-Reformation Protestantism, Edición Editors: Gijsbert van den Brink, Aza Goudriaan

Volumen 14 (2016): Edición 2 (October 2016)
Transformative Poetry and Its Role in Catholic Theology. Dutch Contributions to Contemporary Catholic Research. Edición Editors: Archibald L. H. M. van Wieringen, Marcel Sarot. Translator: Brian Heffernan

Volumen 14 (2016): Edición 1 (June 2016)
African Hermeneutics in the Twenty-First Century. Social History and Indigenous Theologies in Contemporary African Research. Edición Editor: Zorodzai Dube

Volumen 13 (2015): Edición 2 (October 2015)
Edición title: The Long History of Lutheranism in Scandinavia. Contemporary Voices in Finnish Historical Research. Edición Editor: Pirjo Markkola

Volumen 13 (2015): Edición 1 (June 2015)
Edición Title: The Value of Controversy. Defining Early Modern Religion through Ritual and Writing. Edición Editor: Angela Ranson

Volumen 12 (2014): Edición 2 (October 2014)
Special issue title: Exploring the Contours of Patristic Thought. Studies on Exegesis, Christology, and Soteriology in the Early Church

Volumen 12 (2014): Edición 1 (June 2014)
Established and Emerging Voices in Richard Hooker Research, Edición Editor: Paul A. Dominiak

Volumen 11 (2013): Edición 2 (December 2013)

Volumen 11 (2013): Edición 1 (June 2013)

Volumen 10 (2012): Edición 2 (June 2012)

Volumen 10 (2012): Edición 1 (January 2012)

Detalles de la revista
Formato
Revista
eISSN
2284-7308
Publicado por primera vez
20 Sep 2012
Periodo de publicación
3 veces al año
Idiomas
Inglés

Buscar

Volumen 19 (2021): Edición 2 (June 2021)
Fundamental Aspects of Christological Anthropology: Theological and Philosophical Perspectives in Contemporary Debates. Editor: Christopher G. Woznicki

Detalles de la revista
Formato
Revista
eISSN
2284-7308
Publicado por primera vez
20 Sep 2012
Periodo de publicación
3 veces al año
Idiomas
Inglés

Buscar

6 Artículos
Acceso abierto

The Elements of a Christological Anthropology

Publicado en línea: 24 Jun 2021
Páginas: 3 - 20

Resumen

Abstract

Human beings exist in one of two sorts of solidarity, according to St. Paul—the solidarity of sin or alienation ‘in Adam’ or the solidarity of life-giving mutuality in Christ. There can be no Christian theology of the human that is not a theology of communion—which converges with the conviction that our creation in the divine image is creation in relationality. The image of God is not a portion or aspect of human existence but a fundamental orientation towards relation. This understanding of the divine image in turn points to the way in which—as the Orthodox theologian Vladimir Lossky stresses—a proper understanding of the nature of personal being depends upon a proper grasp of the divine image, including the fact that it is always an image of the divine ‘filiation’—the eternal relation of Word to the Father in the Trinity. Our personal flourishing is a filial dependence that liberates and empowers. And what is ‘empowered’ is the human vocation to make reconciled sense of the material world of which we are part, articulating and serving its Godward meaning, so that we may see our humanity as essentially a priestly calling within the reconciling priesthood of Christ, in whom all things cohere.

Palabras clave

  • Filiation
  • Image
  • Person
  • Priestliness
  • Solidarity
Acceso abierto

‘Begin at the Beginning’: Method in Christological Anthropology and T. F. Torrance’s Fallen Human Nature View

Publicado en línea: 24 Jun 2021
Páginas: 21 - 41

Resumen

Abstract

This essay argues that unlike many contemporary christological anthropologies that begin with protology or eschatology, T. F. Torrance’s christological anthropology begins with the incarnate Christ as he confronts us in the midst of God’s redemptive act. This approach is labeled Soteriological-Christological Anthropology. Torrance himself does not develop this anthropological method in a sustained manner, therefore, this essay attempts to develop Torrance’s method by examining his doctrine of Christ’s fallen human nature and his epistemology. After developing Torrance’s Soteriological-Christological Anthropology the challenges and prospects of this view are addressed

Palabras clave

  • Christological Anthropology
  • Epistemology
  • Fallen Human Nature
  • T. F. Torrance
  • Theological Anthropology
Acceso abierto

Did Jesus Need the Spirit? An Appeal for Pneumatic Christology to Inform Christological Anthropology

Publicado en línea: 24 Jun 2021
Páginas: 43 - 61

Resumen

Abstract

A central claim of the Christian faith is that Jesus is not only fully human (and fully God), but that he reveals true humanity to us. This requires that all of our anthropologies, in some way, ground themselves in Christology, providing a ‘Christological anthropology’. Consequently, any Christological anthropology requires some formulation of Christology proper. In light of this, the main contention of the present paper is that one cannot adequately formulate a Christological anthropology without including a pneumatic Christology. The justification for this necessity can be articulated through the concept of fundamental need. The incarnate Logos, Jesus of Nazareth, fundamentally needed the Spirit in the same way that all human persons fundamentally need the Spirit. ‘Fundamental need’, as a technical concept, can help to clarify both the continuity and discontinuity between Jesus’ likeness to all humanity. This does not collapse the ‘who’ of the incarnation into the many ‘who’s’ of humanity since the incarnate Logos always possessed this Spirit as his own Spirit of Sonship, as opposed to how non-divinely hypostasized human persons must receive the Spirit of Sonship by adoption. The distinctiveness and similarity between Jesus and all of humanity can be most clearly seen by paying special attention to the difference between incarnation and indwelling. Thus, by examining incarnation and in-dwelling, as well as introducing fundamental need into theological discourse, the significance of the Spirit for informing both Christology and anthropology will be made clear.

Palabras clave

  • Christological Anthropology
  • Theological Anthropology
  • Spirit Christology
  • Chris-tology
  • Fundamental Need
Acceso abierto

Colin E. Gunton’s Christological Anthropology: Humanity’s Relationships in the Image of Christ

Publicado en línea: 24 Jun 2021
Páginas: 63 - 81

Resumen

Abstract

The anthropology of Colin E. Gunton begins with the Trinity and specifically, the person of Christ. From trinitarian persons, Gunton deduces the ontological definition of what it means to be a person, that is, a being in relationship and in distinction, or ‘free relatedness’. To be a person is to be in the image of the personal God, which is christological language, for it is Christ who bears the image of God in its fullness. As the true image bearer, Christ’s humanity is paradigmatic of what it means to be in relationship: with God, with the world and with other human persons. Gunton’s christology is also thoroughly pneumatological, borrowing Irenaeus’ metaphor of God’s ‘two hands in the world’: The Son and the Spirit. Not only do the Son and the Spirit mediate God’s presence to creation according to Irenaeus, but Gunton builds on this metaphor to include the Spirit’s mediation of the eternal Son to the Father as well as the Incarnate Son to humanity. The Spirit also reshapes humanity to be in the image of Christ, through his relationships with God, with the world and with other human persons. This is an eschatological project, for in this reshaping, the creation is recreated toward its teleological perfection. The article concludes with a potential direction for future study within Gunton’s christological anthropology. To conceive what it means to be human theologically, Gunton insists that we must look to Christ’s own person.

Palabras clave

  • Christological Anthropology
  • Colin Gunton
  • image
  • relationship
  • trinity
Acceso abierto

The Body in Jesus’ Tomb as a Hylemorphic Puzzle: a Response to Jaeger and Sienkiewicz and an Application for Christological Anthropology

Publicado en línea: 24 Jun 2021
Páginas: 83 - 97

Resumen

Abstract

In a recent paper, Andrew Jaeger and Jeremy Sienkiewicz attempt to provide an answer consistent with Thomistic hylemorphism for the following question: what was the ontological status of Christ’s dead body? Answering this question has christological anthropological import: whatever one says about Christ’s dead body, has implications for what one can say about any human’s dead body. Jaeger and Sienkiewicz answer the question this way: that Jesus’ corpse was prime matter lacking a substantial form; that it was existing form-less matter. I argue that their argument for this answer is unsound. I say, given Thomistic hylemorphism, there was no human body in Jesus’s tomb between his death and resurrection. Once I show their argument to be unsound, I provide a christological anthropological upshot: since there was no human body in Christ’s tomb, there are no human bodies in any tomb.

Palabras clave

  • Jaeger
  • Philosophical Anthropology
  • Christological Anthropology
  • Aquinas
Acceso abierto

Pairing Problems: Causal and Christological

Publicado en línea: 24 Jun 2021
Páginas: 99 - 118

Resumen

Abstract

Trenton Merricks has objected to dualist conceptions of the Incarnation in a similar way to Jaegwon Kim’s pairing problem. On the original pairing problem, so argues Kim, we lack a pairing relationship between bodies and souls such that body A is causally paired with soul A and not soul B. Merricks, on the other hand, argues that whatever relations dualists propose that do pair bodies and souls together (e.g. causal relations) are relations that God the Son has with all bodies whatsoever via his divine attributes (e.g. God the Son could cause motion in any and all bodies via his omnipotence). So if we count these relations as sufficient for embodiment, then dualism implies that God the Son is embodied in all bodies whatsoever. I shall argue that while the original pairing problem might be easily answerable, the Christological pairing problem is not and that dualists must shift some of their focus from the defense of the soul’s existence to explicating the nature of the mind-body relationship.

Palabras clave

  • Christological Anthropology
  • Christology
  • Embodiment
  • Mind-Body Dualism
  • Physicalism
6 Artículos
Acceso abierto

The Elements of a Christological Anthropology

Publicado en línea: 24 Jun 2021
Páginas: 3 - 20

Resumen

Abstract

Human beings exist in one of two sorts of solidarity, according to St. Paul—the solidarity of sin or alienation ‘in Adam’ or the solidarity of life-giving mutuality in Christ. There can be no Christian theology of the human that is not a theology of communion—which converges with the conviction that our creation in the divine image is creation in relationality. The image of God is not a portion or aspect of human existence but a fundamental orientation towards relation. This understanding of the divine image in turn points to the way in which—as the Orthodox theologian Vladimir Lossky stresses—a proper understanding of the nature of personal being depends upon a proper grasp of the divine image, including the fact that it is always an image of the divine ‘filiation’—the eternal relation of Word to the Father in the Trinity. Our personal flourishing is a filial dependence that liberates and empowers. And what is ‘empowered’ is the human vocation to make reconciled sense of the material world of which we are part, articulating and serving its Godward meaning, so that we may see our humanity as essentially a priestly calling within the reconciling priesthood of Christ, in whom all things cohere.

Palabras clave

  • Filiation
  • Image
  • Person
  • Priestliness
  • Solidarity
Acceso abierto

‘Begin at the Beginning’: Method in Christological Anthropology and T. F. Torrance’s Fallen Human Nature View

Publicado en línea: 24 Jun 2021
Páginas: 21 - 41

Resumen

Abstract

This essay argues that unlike many contemporary christological anthropologies that begin with protology or eschatology, T. F. Torrance’s christological anthropology begins with the incarnate Christ as he confronts us in the midst of God’s redemptive act. This approach is labeled Soteriological-Christological Anthropology. Torrance himself does not develop this anthropological method in a sustained manner, therefore, this essay attempts to develop Torrance’s method by examining his doctrine of Christ’s fallen human nature and his epistemology. After developing Torrance’s Soteriological-Christological Anthropology the challenges and prospects of this view are addressed

Palabras clave

  • Christological Anthropology
  • Epistemology
  • Fallen Human Nature
  • T. F. Torrance
  • Theological Anthropology
Acceso abierto

Did Jesus Need the Spirit? An Appeal for Pneumatic Christology to Inform Christological Anthropology

Publicado en línea: 24 Jun 2021
Páginas: 43 - 61

Resumen

Abstract

A central claim of the Christian faith is that Jesus is not only fully human (and fully God), but that he reveals true humanity to us. This requires that all of our anthropologies, in some way, ground themselves in Christology, providing a ‘Christological anthropology’. Consequently, any Christological anthropology requires some formulation of Christology proper. In light of this, the main contention of the present paper is that one cannot adequately formulate a Christological anthropology without including a pneumatic Christology. The justification for this necessity can be articulated through the concept of fundamental need. The incarnate Logos, Jesus of Nazareth, fundamentally needed the Spirit in the same way that all human persons fundamentally need the Spirit. ‘Fundamental need’, as a technical concept, can help to clarify both the continuity and discontinuity between Jesus’ likeness to all humanity. This does not collapse the ‘who’ of the incarnation into the many ‘who’s’ of humanity since the incarnate Logos always possessed this Spirit as his own Spirit of Sonship, as opposed to how non-divinely hypostasized human persons must receive the Spirit of Sonship by adoption. The distinctiveness and similarity between Jesus and all of humanity can be most clearly seen by paying special attention to the difference between incarnation and indwelling. Thus, by examining incarnation and in-dwelling, as well as introducing fundamental need into theological discourse, the significance of the Spirit for informing both Christology and anthropology will be made clear.

Palabras clave

  • Christological Anthropology
  • Theological Anthropology
  • Spirit Christology
  • Chris-tology
  • Fundamental Need
Acceso abierto

Colin E. Gunton’s Christological Anthropology: Humanity’s Relationships in the Image of Christ

Publicado en línea: 24 Jun 2021
Páginas: 63 - 81

Resumen

Abstract

The anthropology of Colin E. Gunton begins with the Trinity and specifically, the person of Christ. From trinitarian persons, Gunton deduces the ontological definition of what it means to be a person, that is, a being in relationship and in distinction, or ‘free relatedness’. To be a person is to be in the image of the personal God, which is christological language, for it is Christ who bears the image of God in its fullness. As the true image bearer, Christ’s humanity is paradigmatic of what it means to be in relationship: with God, with the world and with other human persons. Gunton’s christology is also thoroughly pneumatological, borrowing Irenaeus’ metaphor of God’s ‘two hands in the world’: The Son and the Spirit. Not only do the Son and the Spirit mediate God’s presence to creation according to Irenaeus, but Gunton builds on this metaphor to include the Spirit’s mediation of the eternal Son to the Father as well as the Incarnate Son to humanity. The Spirit also reshapes humanity to be in the image of Christ, through his relationships with God, with the world and with other human persons. This is an eschatological project, for in this reshaping, the creation is recreated toward its teleological perfection. The article concludes with a potential direction for future study within Gunton’s christological anthropology. To conceive what it means to be human theologically, Gunton insists that we must look to Christ’s own person.

Palabras clave

  • Christological Anthropology
  • Colin Gunton
  • image
  • relationship
  • trinity
Acceso abierto

The Body in Jesus’ Tomb as a Hylemorphic Puzzle: a Response to Jaeger and Sienkiewicz and an Application for Christological Anthropology

Publicado en línea: 24 Jun 2021
Páginas: 83 - 97

Resumen

Abstract

In a recent paper, Andrew Jaeger and Jeremy Sienkiewicz attempt to provide an answer consistent with Thomistic hylemorphism for the following question: what was the ontological status of Christ’s dead body? Answering this question has christological anthropological import: whatever one says about Christ’s dead body, has implications for what one can say about any human’s dead body. Jaeger and Sienkiewicz answer the question this way: that Jesus’ corpse was prime matter lacking a substantial form; that it was existing form-less matter. I argue that their argument for this answer is unsound. I say, given Thomistic hylemorphism, there was no human body in Jesus’s tomb between his death and resurrection. Once I show their argument to be unsound, I provide a christological anthropological upshot: since there was no human body in Christ’s tomb, there are no human bodies in any tomb.

Palabras clave

  • Jaeger
  • Philosophical Anthropology
  • Christological Anthropology
  • Aquinas
Acceso abierto

Pairing Problems: Causal and Christological

Publicado en línea: 24 Jun 2021
Páginas: 99 - 118

Resumen

Abstract

Trenton Merricks has objected to dualist conceptions of the Incarnation in a similar way to Jaegwon Kim’s pairing problem. On the original pairing problem, so argues Kim, we lack a pairing relationship between bodies and souls such that body A is causally paired with soul A and not soul B. Merricks, on the other hand, argues that whatever relations dualists propose that do pair bodies and souls together (e.g. causal relations) are relations that God the Son has with all bodies whatsoever via his divine attributes (e.g. God the Son could cause motion in any and all bodies via his omnipotence). So if we count these relations as sufficient for embodiment, then dualism implies that God the Son is embodied in all bodies whatsoever. I shall argue that while the original pairing problem might be easily answerable, the Christological pairing problem is not and that dualists must shift some of their focus from the defense of the soul’s existence to explicating the nature of the mind-body relationship.

Palabras clave

  • Christological Anthropology
  • Christology
  • Embodiment
  • Mind-Body Dualism
  • Physicalism

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