Revista y Edición

Volumen 5 (2022): Edición 1 (April 2022)

Volumen 4 (2017): Edición 3 (October 2017)

Volumen 4 (2017): Edición 2 (April 2017)

Volumen 4 (2017): Edición 1 (January 2017)

Volumen 3 (2016): Edición 4 (October 2016)

Volumen 3 (2016): Edición 3 (July 2016)

Volumen 3 (2016): Edición 2 (April 2016)

Volumen 3 (2016): Edición 1 (January 2016)

Volumen 2 (2015): Edición 4 (October 2015)

Volumen 2 (2015): Edición 3 (July 2015)

Volumen 2 (2015): Edición 2 (April 2015)

Volumen 2 (2015): Edición 1 (January 2015)

Volumen 1 (2014): Edición 1 (October 2014)

Detalles de la revista
Formato
Revista
eISSN
2049-7156
Publicado por primera vez
15 Mar 2014
Periodo de publicación
4 veces al año
Idiomas
Inglés

Buscar

Volumen 3 (2016): Edición 1 (January 2016)

Detalles de la revista
Formato
Revista
eISSN
2049-7156
Publicado por primera vez
15 Mar 2014
Periodo de publicación
4 veces al año
Idiomas
Inglés

Buscar

1 Artículos
Acceso abierto

‘Mind your Local Accent’ Does accent training resonate to college students’ English use?

Publicado en línea: 09 Feb 2016
Páginas: 1 - 28

Resumen

Abstract

The recent development of English as a lingua franca (ELF) has encouraged language policy makers and educators to view the English language and ELT from an alternative but critical perspective that challenges some language ideologies, such as standard language and linguistic imperialism. Current ELT practices seem to neglect the trend towards the development of the global status of English. In addition, ELT is still largely native-oriented and less ELF-oriented. A Chinese university is the context of this case study. From an ELF perspective, this paper addresses some ELT issues, particularly with regard to teaching pronunciation, through the analysis of two documents and a discussion of the student participants’ interview comments. It is argued that current pronunciation teaching is still native-oriented and based on the English as a foreign language (EFL) perspective. The ELF concept is emergent and has not been fully recognised. This paper proposes a teaching approach called Teaching of Pronunciation for Intercultural Communication (ToPIC), which suggests ELF-informed pronunciation teaching strategies for intercultural communication in relation to students’ wider language-use goals in the conclusion.

1 Artículos
Acceso abierto

‘Mind your Local Accent’ Does accent training resonate to college students’ English use?

Publicado en línea: 09 Feb 2016
Páginas: 1 - 28

Resumen

Abstract

The recent development of English as a lingua franca (ELF) has encouraged language policy makers and educators to view the English language and ELT from an alternative but critical perspective that challenges some language ideologies, such as standard language and linguistic imperialism. Current ELT practices seem to neglect the trend towards the development of the global status of English. In addition, ELT is still largely native-oriented and less ELF-oriented. A Chinese university is the context of this case study. From an ELF perspective, this paper addresses some ELT issues, particularly with regard to teaching pronunciation, through the analysis of two documents and a discussion of the student participants’ interview comments. It is argued that current pronunciation teaching is still native-oriented and based on the English as a foreign language (EFL) perspective. The ELF concept is emergent and has not been fully recognised. This paper proposes a teaching approach called Teaching of Pronunciation for Intercultural Communication (ToPIC), which suggests ELF-informed pronunciation teaching strategies for intercultural communication in relation to students’ wider language-use goals in the conclusion.

Planifique su conferencia remota con Sciendo