Zeitschriften und Ausgaben

Volumen 20 (2022): Heft 5 (December 2022)
Doctoral Supplement. Postgraduate Research in Contemporary Evangelical Higher Education: Academic Perspectives on Variegated Theological and Historical Topics. Heft Editor: Marcel V. Măcelaru

Volumen 20 (2022): Heft 4 (December 2022)
Miscellaneous Theological Investigations. From Economy, Literature, and Hermeneutics to Christology, Exegesis, and Typology. Heft Editor: Corneliu C. Simuț

Volumen 20 (2022): Heft 3 (July 2022)
A Multi-Angle Examination of C. S. Lewis's Till We Have Faces. Theological, Philosophical, Ethical, and Literary Insights from one of Lewis's Greatest Novels. Heft Editor: Zachary Breitenbach

Volumen 20 (2022): Heft 2 (June 2022)
Reform according to Right Law: the Use of Legal Tradition in Reformation Theology. Heft Editor: André A. Gazal

Volumen 20 (2022): Heft 1 (March 2022)
Confessing the Trinity. The Trinitarianism of Particular Baptists, 1640s-1840s. Heft Editor: Michael A. G. Haykin

Volumen 19 (2021): Heft 4 (December 2021)
Miscellaneous Theological Studies: Biblical, Apologetic, Historical, Patristic, Theodicean, and Systematic. Heft Editor: Corneliu C. Simuţ

Volumen 19 (2021): Heft 3 (July 2021)
Islam and Islamism. The Challenge for Modern Liberal Democracies. Heft Editors: Raphael Lataster, Rumy Hasan

Volumen 19 (2021): Heft 2 (June 2021)
Fundamental Aspects of Christological Anthropology: Theological and Philosophical Perspectives in Contemporary Debates. Editor: Christopher G. Woznicki

Volumen 19 (2021): Heft 1 (March 2021)
Revivalism in Central European Protestantism, 1840-1940: Hungarian Calvinists, British Evangelicals & German-Austrian Pietists during the Spiritual Renewal of Protestant Churches in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Editor: Ábraham Kovács

Volumen 18 (2020): Heft 6 (December 2020)
The Catholic Reformation. Ecclesiology, Justification, Freedom, Sin, Grace & the Council of Trent. Editor: Eduardo J. Echeverria

Volumen 18 (2020): Heft 5 (October 2020)
Roman Catholic, Reformed Catholic and Evangelical Protestant. Reformation Hefts Five Hundred Years Later. Editor: Heft editor: Joshua R. Farris

Volumen 18 (2020): Heft 4 (August 2020)
Heft 4 (Aug 2020): From Paris to Tortosa, via Barcelona (1240-1413), Characters, Hefts and Problems in Medieval Jewish-Christian Disputations. Editor: Francesco Bianchi

Volumen 18 (2020): Heft 3 (July 2020)
In the Footsteps of the Divine Artist. On the Religious and Spiritual Dimension in Art. Editors: Wessel Stoker and Frank G. Bosman

Volumen 18 (2020): Heft 2 (June 2020)
De Corpore – ‘On the Body’ through the History of Idea, Views of the Body in Philosophy, Literature and Religion. Editor: Ramona Simuț

Volumen 18 (2020): Heft 1 (March 2020)
Baptist and Reformed Theologies of Vision and Deification (2). Constructive Hefts in Contemporary Research. Editors: Joshua R. Farris and Ryan A. Brandt

Volumen 17 (2019): Heft 4 (December 2019)
Patristic Thought in Byzantine and Protestant Theology. From Gregory Palamas and George Pachymeres to Luther, Calvin, Anglicans, and Anabaptists. Editor: Andre A. Gazal

Volumen 17 (2019): Heft 3 (July 2019)
Contemporary Evangelicals on Carl F. H. Henry’s Theology. From Philosophy, Evangelism, and Apologetics to Education, History, and Practice. Editor: Robert W. Talley

Volumen 17 (2019): Heft 2 (June 2019)
Baptist and Reformed Theologies of Vision and Deification. Editors: Joshua R. Farris and Ryan A. Brandt

Volumen 17 (2019): Heft s2 (July 2019)
Single Author Supplement 2: The Background and Nature of the Dissensions in 1 Corinthians 1-4. Apollos' Role and Paul's Response. Author: Corin Mihăilă

Volumen 17 (2019): Heft 1 (March 2019)
The Father, Son, and Spirit in Early Christian Theology, Second Century Examples. Editor: Paul A. Hartog

Volumen 17 (2019): Heft s1 (January 2019)
Single Author Supplement 1: Theological Patterns in Reformation Thought. English, American, and Scottish Protestants on Christ, Revival, and the Covenant. Author: Dinu Moga

Volumen 16 (2018): Heft 4 (December 2018)
Tome huitième: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1518-2018. Contemporary Perspectives on History and Theology in British Baptist Thought. Scottish and English Baptists on Salvation, Politics, and the End of Times. Heft editor: Alasdair Black

Volumen 16 (2018): Heft 3 (July 2018)
Tome septieme: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1518-2018. Teaching Leaders, Leading Teachers. Biblical and Historical Perspectives on Education and Leadership: Jeffrey M. Horner Heft editor: Jeffrey M. Horner

Volumen 16 (2018): Heft 2 (June 2018)
Tome sixième: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1518-2018. Contemporary Perspectives on Molinism. Theories, Responses to Objections, and Applications, Heft editor: Kirk R. MacGregor

Volumen 16 (2018): Heft 1 (April 2018)
Tome cinquième: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1518-2018. Insights into Contemporary Baptist Thought. Perspectives on European Baptist Theology and History, Heft editor: Toivo Pilli

Volumen 15 (2017): Heft 4 (December 2017)
Special Heft: Tome quatrieme: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1517-2017. Investigating the Magisterial Reformation and Its Radical Contenders. Contemporary Evangelicals on Reformation Research: from Lutheranism and Zwinglianism to Anabaptism and Baptism, Heft Editor: Marvin Jones

Volumen 15 (2017): Heft 3 (October 2017)
Special Heft: Tome troisième: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1517-2017. Theologizing about Spirituality, Pedagogy, and Soteriology. Miscellanea Antiqua, Medievalia, Reformatorica & Moderna by Corneliu Simuț

Volumen 15 (2017): Heft 2 (July 2017)
Special Heft: : Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1517-2017. ‘On the Soul’ through the History of Ideas. Views of the Soul in Philosophy, Literature & Relivion by Ramona Simuț

Volumen 15 (2017): Heft 1 (May 2017)
Heft title: Tome premier: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation: 1517-2017. Anthologizing History, the Bible, and Theology. Miscellanea Celtica, Humanistica & Reformatorica by Thomas O’Loughlin and Corneliu C. Simuț

Volumen 14 (2016): Heft 3 (December 2016)
Avant-Premiere: Celebrating 500 Years since the Reformation, 1517-2017. Contemporary Perspectives on Reformed Orthodoxy. Reformed Confessions, Scholastic Thought, and Puritan Divinity in Post-Reformation Protestantism, Heft Editors: Gijsbert van den Brink, Aza Goudriaan

Volumen 14 (2016): Heft 2 (October 2016)
Transformative Poetry and Its Role in Catholic Theology. Dutch Contributions to Contemporary Catholic Research. Heft Editors: Archibald L. H. M. van Wieringen, Marcel Sarot. Translator: Brian Heffernan

Volumen 14 (2016): Heft 1 (June 2016)
African Hermeneutics in the Twenty-First Century. Social History and Indigenous Theologies in Contemporary African Research. Heft Editor: Zorodzai Dube

Volumen 13 (2015): Heft 2 (October 2015)
Heft title: The Long History of Lutheranism in Scandinavia. Contemporary Voices in Finnish Historical Research. Heft Editor: Pirjo Markkola

Volumen 13 (2015): Heft 1 (June 2015)
Heft Title: The Value of Controversy. Defining Early Modern Religion through Ritual and Writing. Heft Editor: Angela Ranson

Volumen 12 (2014): Heft 2 (October 2014)
Special issue title: Exploring the Contours of Patristic Thought. Studies on Exegesis, Christology, and Soteriology in the Early Church

Volumen 12 (2014): Heft 1 (June 2014)
Established and Emerging Voices in Richard Hooker Research, Heft Editor: Paul A. Dominiak

Volumen 11 (2013): Heft 2 (December 2013)

Volumen 11 (2013): Heft 1 (June 2013)

Volumen 10 (2012): Heft 2 (June 2012)

Volumen 10 (2012): Heft 1 (January 2012)

Zeitschriftendaten
Format
Zeitschrift
eISSN
2284-7308
Erstveröffentlichung
20 Sep 2012
Erscheinungsweise
3 Hefte pro Jahr
Sprachen
Englisch

Suche

Volumen 20 (2022): Heft 1 (March 2022)
Confessing the Trinity. The Trinitarianism of Particular Baptists, 1640s-1840s. Heft Editor: Michael A. G. Haykin

Zeitschriftendaten
Format
Zeitschrift
eISSN
2284-7308
Erstveröffentlichung
20 Sep 2012
Erscheinungsweise
3 Hefte pro Jahr
Sprachen
Englisch

Suche

6 Artikel
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

A Forgotten Debate? Trinitarianism & the Particular Baptists

Online veröffentlicht: 26 Apr 2022
Seitenbereich: 3 - 7

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

This article sets the stage for the essays in this issue of Perichoresis on the Trinitarianism of the Particular Baptists in the British Isles and Ireland between the 1640s and 1840s. It argues that this Trinitarianism is part of a larger debate about the Trinity that has been greatly forgotten in the scholarly history of this doctrine. It also touches on the way that Baptist theologians like John Gill were critical to the preservation of Trinitarian witness among this Christian community.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Trinity
  • long eighteenth century
  • John Gill
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

‘Three Subsistences … One Substance’: the Doctrine of the Trinity in the Second London Confession

Online veröffentlicht: 26 Apr 2022
Seitenbereich: 9 - 21

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

This article examines the doctrine of the Trinity taught in the Second London Confession of Faith of 1677. It begins by examining a trinitarian controversy among the Particular Baptists of England in the mid-seventeenth century. After outlining the doctrinal deviations of Thomas Collier, the article proceeds to describe some of the responses to Collier from the Particular Baptist community. In many ways the Second London Confession can be seen as a response to Collier. The article also explores the theology of Hercules Collins, a signatory of the Second London Confession, in contrast to the doctrinal deviations of Collier. The article shows that the Particular Baptists continued in the orthodox Christian tradition of the Apostles, Nicene, and Chalcedonian Creeds. They adopted the Reformed confessional language of the Westminster Confession of 1646 and the Savoy Declaration of 1658 while at the same time not fearing to adjust the language in accordance with their orthodox commitments.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Trinity
  • Second London Confession
  • Nicene Creed
  • Apostles Creed
  • Hercules Collins
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

The Universal Tradition and the Clear Meaning of Scripture: Benjamin Keach’s Understanding of the Trinity

Online veröffentlicht: 26 Apr 2022
Seitenbereich: 23 - 34

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Leading Particular Baptist theologian Benjamin Keach (1640-1704) came to prominence just as an antitrinitarian theology native to England gained a stronghold. What had previously been deemed off-limits by the Establishment became a commonplace by the end of the seventeenth century based on a strict biblicism that eschewed the extra-biblical language of trinitarian orthodoxy. As one who considered himself a strong biblicist, Keach deftly maneuvered his theological writings between what he saw as two extremes: the one that refused to consider any language that moved beyond the mere words of scripture, represented by many of his General Baptist contemporaries and the other that over-emphasized the role of tradition with no eye toward biblical truth, represented by the Roman Catholics. Keach’s explication of trinitarianism demonstrated that these two extremes did not have to be seen as competing with each other. Instead, the correct understanding of the Bible included ‘the just and necessary consequences’ that could be deduced from Scripture, and the ‘universal tradition’ aided the pastor theologian in ascertaining the truth. The result, for Keach and his audience, was an ancient view of trinitarianism that offered a way of peace between the the two extremes vying for the public ear in the late seventeenth century.

Schlüsselwörter

  • trinity
  • Socinianism
  • Benjamin Keach
  • trinitarianism
  • antitrinitarianism
  • biblicism
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

The Salters’ Hall Controversy: Heresy, Subscription, or Both?

Online veröffentlicht: 26 Apr 2022
Seitenbereich: 35 - 52

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

The Salters’ Hall controversy (1719) was a watershed event in the history of English Dissent. Some historians have interpreted the controversy as an early sign of the theological demise of the English General Baptists and the English Presbyterians. Conversely, the controversy has also been used to demonstrate the theological steadfastness of the English Particular Baptists and Congregationalist in the eighteenth century. Yet some of the earliest accounts of the Salters’ Hall controversy maintain that the controversy was not about the doctrine of the Trinity, but rather the requirement of subscription to extrabiblical words and phrases. This was the view of the revered divine Edmund Calamy, who refused to be involved in the controversy, even at the potential expense of his reputation. Edward Wallin, a Particular Baptist subscriber at Salters’ Hall, held a similar view of the controversy. While some historians acknowledge these accounts, they seem to ultimately doubt their truthfulness. This hesitancy is likely due, in part, to the fact that there were a few anti-Trinitarians among the nonsubscribers at Salters’ Hall. Furthermore, the English General Baptists and the English Presbyterians did deviate from theological orthodoxy later in the century. However, those who question the motives of the Non-subscribers at Salters’ Hall fail to take into account a theologically orthodox, nonsubscribing tradition among the English General Baptists and the English Presbyterians found in the writings of Thomas Grantham and Richard Baxter. In sum, one’s orthodoxy at Salters’ Hall cannot be determined solely on the basis of one’s view of subscription.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Trinity
  • Subscription
  • Confessionalism
  • Baxter
  • Grantham
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

John Gill (1697-1771) and the Eternally Begotten Word of God

Online veröffentlicht: 26 Apr 2022
Seitenbereich: 53 - 69

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

The Baptist pastor John Gill (1697-1771) believed the doctrine of eternal generation was vital to the Christian faith. While he firmly held to the doctrine of eternal generation, counting it as indispensable for grounding distinctions between the persons within the Godhead, he denied that the divine essence is communicated in generation. Generation, for Gill, entailed only the begetting of persons, and spoke to the ordering and personal relations between the Trinitarian Persons. As the second Person, the Son is from the Father, but as God, he is of himself. This understanding of eternal generation flowed from Gill’s commitment to the aseity of all the divine Persons. According to Gill, each of the divine Persons fully possesses the essence without any communication of essence and without respect to their ordered subsistence. Each person equally, fully, and eternally partakes of the divine essence of himself. Gill’s affirmation of eternal generation was strengthened and elaborated by his understanding of the Son as the divine Word. Gill’s understanding of the Son as the divine Word incorporated the analogy of the mind, which was further understood by other Scriptural images and was further apprehended by the Son’s identification as Wisdom. Gill understood these analogies and names as mutually defining for understanding the nature of the Son of God. The central theological implications of this divine name, namely, the Son’s deity, eternality, and distinct personality, were all based on Gill’s reading of Scripture, most notably in the Gospel of John.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Trinity
  • eternal generation
  • aseity
  • communication
  • logos
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

‘Not the Same God’: Alexander Carson (1776-1844) and the Ulster Trinitarian Controversy

Online veröffentlicht: 26 Apr 2022
Seitenbereich: 71 - 87

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

The impact of the Salters’ Hall Synod went beyond its immediate context in England and spread throughout the British Isles and into Ireland. Ulster Presbyterianism was wracked with debate over confessional subscriptionism and Unitarianism. Two key interlocutors in this debate were the Unitarian theologian William Hamilton Drummond and his orthodox counterpart, Alexander Carson. This essay traces the debate with a particular emphasis on their use of Scottish Common Sense philosophy as a way into or out of heterodox views of the Trinity.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Trinity
  • Unitarianism
  • divine attributes
  • long eighteenth century
  • Alexander Carson
  • William Hamilton Drummond
  • Ulster Presbyterianism
  • Scottish Enlightenment
6 Artikel
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

A Forgotten Debate? Trinitarianism & the Particular Baptists

Online veröffentlicht: 26 Apr 2022
Seitenbereich: 3 - 7

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

This article sets the stage for the essays in this issue of Perichoresis on the Trinitarianism of the Particular Baptists in the British Isles and Ireland between the 1640s and 1840s. It argues that this Trinitarianism is part of a larger debate about the Trinity that has been greatly forgotten in the scholarly history of this doctrine. It also touches on the way that Baptist theologians like John Gill were critical to the preservation of Trinitarian witness among this Christian community.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Trinity
  • long eighteenth century
  • John Gill
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

‘Three Subsistences … One Substance’: the Doctrine of the Trinity in the Second London Confession

Online veröffentlicht: 26 Apr 2022
Seitenbereich: 9 - 21

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

This article examines the doctrine of the Trinity taught in the Second London Confession of Faith of 1677. It begins by examining a trinitarian controversy among the Particular Baptists of England in the mid-seventeenth century. After outlining the doctrinal deviations of Thomas Collier, the article proceeds to describe some of the responses to Collier from the Particular Baptist community. In many ways the Second London Confession can be seen as a response to Collier. The article also explores the theology of Hercules Collins, a signatory of the Second London Confession, in contrast to the doctrinal deviations of Collier. The article shows that the Particular Baptists continued in the orthodox Christian tradition of the Apostles, Nicene, and Chalcedonian Creeds. They adopted the Reformed confessional language of the Westminster Confession of 1646 and the Savoy Declaration of 1658 while at the same time not fearing to adjust the language in accordance with their orthodox commitments.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Trinity
  • Second London Confession
  • Nicene Creed
  • Apostles Creed
  • Hercules Collins
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

The Universal Tradition and the Clear Meaning of Scripture: Benjamin Keach’s Understanding of the Trinity

Online veröffentlicht: 26 Apr 2022
Seitenbereich: 23 - 34

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

Leading Particular Baptist theologian Benjamin Keach (1640-1704) came to prominence just as an antitrinitarian theology native to England gained a stronghold. What had previously been deemed off-limits by the Establishment became a commonplace by the end of the seventeenth century based on a strict biblicism that eschewed the extra-biblical language of trinitarian orthodoxy. As one who considered himself a strong biblicist, Keach deftly maneuvered his theological writings between what he saw as two extremes: the one that refused to consider any language that moved beyond the mere words of scripture, represented by many of his General Baptist contemporaries and the other that over-emphasized the role of tradition with no eye toward biblical truth, represented by the Roman Catholics. Keach’s explication of trinitarianism demonstrated that these two extremes did not have to be seen as competing with each other. Instead, the correct understanding of the Bible included ‘the just and necessary consequences’ that could be deduced from Scripture, and the ‘universal tradition’ aided the pastor theologian in ascertaining the truth. The result, for Keach and his audience, was an ancient view of trinitarianism that offered a way of peace between the the two extremes vying for the public ear in the late seventeenth century.

Schlüsselwörter

  • trinity
  • Socinianism
  • Benjamin Keach
  • trinitarianism
  • antitrinitarianism
  • biblicism
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

The Salters’ Hall Controversy: Heresy, Subscription, or Both?

Online veröffentlicht: 26 Apr 2022
Seitenbereich: 35 - 52

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

The Salters’ Hall controversy (1719) was a watershed event in the history of English Dissent. Some historians have interpreted the controversy as an early sign of the theological demise of the English General Baptists and the English Presbyterians. Conversely, the controversy has also been used to demonstrate the theological steadfastness of the English Particular Baptists and Congregationalist in the eighteenth century. Yet some of the earliest accounts of the Salters’ Hall controversy maintain that the controversy was not about the doctrine of the Trinity, but rather the requirement of subscription to extrabiblical words and phrases. This was the view of the revered divine Edmund Calamy, who refused to be involved in the controversy, even at the potential expense of his reputation. Edward Wallin, a Particular Baptist subscriber at Salters’ Hall, held a similar view of the controversy. While some historians acknowledge these accounts, they seem to ultimately doubt their truthfulness. This hesitancy is likely due, in part, to the fact that there were a few anti-Trinitarians among the nonsubscribers at Salters’ Hall. Furthermore, the English General Baptists and the English Presbyterians did deviate from theological orthodoxy later in the century. However, those who question the motives of the Non-subscribers at Salters’ Hall fail to take into account a theologically orthodox, nonsubscribing tradition among the English General Baptists and the English Presbyterians found in the writings of Thomas Grantham and Richard Baxter. In sum, one’s orthodoxy at Salters’ Hall cannot be determined solely on the basis of one’s view of subscription.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Trinity
  • Subscription
  • Confessionalism
  • Baxter
  • Grantham
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

John Gill (1697-1771) and the Eternally Begotten Word of God

Online veröffentlicht: 26 Apr 2022
Seitenbereich: 53 - 69

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

The Baptist pastor John Gill (1697-1771) believed the doctrine of eternal generation was vital to the Christian faith. While he firmly held to the doctrine of eternal generation, counting it as indispensable for grounding distinctions between the persons within the Godhead, he denied that the divine essence is communicated in generation. Generation, for Gill, entailed only the begetting of persons, and spoke to the ordering and personal relations between the Trinitarian Persons. As the second Person, the Son is from the Father, but as God, he is of himself. This understanding of eternal generation flowed from Gill’s commitment to the aseity of all the divine Persons. According to Gill, each of the divine Persons fully possesses the essence without any communication of essence and without respect to their ordered subsistence. Each person equally, fully, and eternally partakes of the divine essence of himself. Gill’s affirmation of eternal generation was strengthened and elaborated by his understanding of the Son as the divine Word. Gill’s understanding of the Son as the divine Word incorporated the analogy of the mind, which was further understood by other Scriptural images and was further apprehended by the Son’s identification as Wisdom. Gill understood these analogies and names as mutually defining for understanding the nature of the Son of God. The central theological implications of this divine name, namely, the Son’s deity, eternality, and distinct personality, were all based on Gill’s reading of Scripture, most notably in the Gospel of John.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Trinity
  • eternal generation
  • aseity
  • communication
  • logos
Uneingeschränkter Zugang

‘Not the Same God’: Alexander Carson (1776-1844) and the Ulster Trinitarian Controversy

Online veröffentlicht: 26 Apr 2022
Seitenbereich: 71 - 87

Zusammenfassung

Abstract

The impact of the Salters’ Hall Synod went beyond its immediate context in England and spread throughout the British Isles and into Ireland. Ulster Presbyterianism was wracked with debate over confessional subscriptionism and Unitarianism. Two key interlocutors in this debate were the Unitarian theologian William Hamilton Drummond and his orthodox counterpart, Alexander Carson. This essay traces the debate with a particular emphasis on their use of Scottish Common Sense philosophy as a way into or out of heterodox views of the Trinity.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Trinity
  • Unitarianism
  • divine attributes
  • long eighteenth century
  • Alexander Carson
  • William Hamilton Drummond
  • Ulster Presbyterianism
  • Scottish Enlightenment

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