1. bookVolume 2 (2015): Issue 2 (December 2015)
    Participation across Institutional and Disciplinary Boundaries
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2246-3755
First Published
01 Nov 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Recovery to Resilience

Published Online: 30 Mar 2021
Volume & Issue: Volume 2 (2015) - Issue 2 (December 2015) - Participation across Institutional and Disciplinary Boundaries
Page range: 99 - 116
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2246-3755
First Published
01 Nov 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

As the tenth anniversary of New Orleans’ and arguably the United States’ greatest disaster came and went on August 29th this year, it is important to look critically at steps taken towards recovery in order to understand whether the massive efforts undertaken within and outside our community have led to sustainability and resilience, and to inform ongoing and future recovery and revitalization efforts. Our investigation draws from critical urban theory as defined by Brenner: “grounded on an antagonistic relationship not only to inherited urban knowledges, but more generally, to existing urban formations. It insists that another, more democratic, socially just, and sustainable form of urbanization is possible, even if such possibilities are being suppressed through dominant institutional arrangements, practices and ideologies” (Brenner 2012).

The anniversary served as a celebration of resilience for local officials anxious to focus on the city’s bright future and to let talk of a recovery-based economy lay behind us. On the ground, however, commemoration provided a pivot point in the thinking of local citizens, neighborhood groups, non-profit organizations, and those that serve them. It serves as well as a locus for counter-narratives of inequity and removal, for anger at hospitals closed, schools reordered, and a hundred thousand residents permanently displaced. These challenges are not new or unique to New Orleans, but the crucible of ten years of collaborative recovery work at the level of individuals, blocks, and neighborhoods allows us to organize and practice self-critique in the face of a changing economy, re-invented school system, upended healthcare structure, and other challenges.

Our perspective is shaped by witnessing a decade of top-down planning efforts, and by participating in official attempts at community engagement in recovery; some effective, some wildly ineffectual. While this work continues, now is a chance to refocus efforts towards building strong communities with equitable access to economic opportunity. It is a moment to recognize the successes and failures in the means of creating recovery to this point, with a focus on social justice and implementing changes and improvements meant to address broader and deeper problems facing our neighborhoods and the city at large.

Keywords

Brenner, N. (2012). What is critical urban theory? In N. Brenner, P. Marcuse and M. Mayer (eds.), Cities for people, not for profit, Routledge, London.Search in Google Scholar

Cooper, C. (1990). Old Line Families Escape Worst of the Flood and Plot the Future. Wall Street Journal 8 Sept. 1990. http://online.wsj.com/articles/SB112614485840634882Search in Google Scholar

Etheridge, D, and E. Taylor (2013). Radical Incrementalism: An Open Letter in Defense of the Small. Oz, Volume 35.10.4148/2378-5853.1512Search in Google Scholar

Finger, D. (2008). Stranded and Squandered: Lost on the Road Home. Seattle J. Soc. Just. 7:1, 68.Search in Google Scholar

Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center et al v. U.S. Dep’t of Housing and Urban Development and Paul Rainwater, District Court for District of Columbia, Case No. CV-01938Search in Google Scholar

Fussell, E., N. Sastry, and M.V. Landingham (2010). Race, socioeconomic status, and return migration to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina,” Population & Environment, 31(1-3): 20-42.10.1007/s11111-009-0092-2Search in Google Scholar

Gotham, K.F. (2014). Reinforcing Inequalities: The Impact of the CDBG Program on Post-Katrina Rebuilding. Housing Policy Debate, 24:1, 192-212. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10511482.2013.84066610.1080/10511482.2013.840666Search in Google Scholar

Sakakeeny, M. (2015). Living in a Laboratory: New Orleans Today. Books and Ideas, 10 September 2015. Accessed 1 January, 2015 at http://www.booksandideas.net/Living-in-a-Laboratory-New-Orleans-Today.htmlSearch in Google Scholar

New Orleans-Based Activists (2015). Letter From the People of New Orleans to Our Friends and Allies. Left Turn – Notes from the global intifada. http://www.leftturn.org/letter-people-new-orleans-our-friends-and-alliesSearch in Google Scholar

O’Donoghue, J. (2015). Louisiana’s budget is a fiscal mess: How did we get here? The Times-Picayune 9 http://www.nola.com/politics/index.ssf/2015/04/louisiana_budget_how_did_we_ge.htmlSearch in Google Scholar

Rose, D.J., N. Bodor, J.C. Rice, C.M. Swalm, and P.L. Hutchinson (2011). The effects of Hurricane Katrina on food access disparities in New Orleans. American Journal Of Public Health 101, no. 3: 482-484.Search in Google Scholar

The State of Transit in New Orleans: Ten Years After Katrina. New Orleans: RIDE New Orleans, 2015. http://rideneworleans.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/sots2015new.pdfSearch in Google Scholar

Wooten, T. (2012). We Shall Not Be Moved: Rebuilding Home in the Wake of Katrina. Beacon Press.Search in Google Scholar

Recommended articles from Trend MD

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo