1. bookVolume 10 (2021): Issue 1 (February 2021)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
03 Oct 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

The Sociology of Global Warming: A Scientometric Look

Published Online: 01 Mar 2021
Page range: 18 - 33
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
03 Oct 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

The theory of anthropogenic global warming (AGW) enjoys considerable consensus among experts. It is widely recognized that global industrialization is producing an increase in the planet’s temperatures and causing environmental disasters. Still, there are scholars – although a minority – who consider groundless either the idea of global warming itself or the idea that it constitutes an existential threat for humanity. This lack of scientific unanimity (as well as differing political ideologies) ignites controversies in the political world, the mass media, and public opinion as well. Sociologists have been dealing with this issue for some time, producing researches and studies based on their specific competencies. Using scientometric tools, this article tries to establish to what extent and in which capacity sociologists are studying the phenomenon of climate change. Particular attention is paid to meta-analytical aspects such as consensus, thematic trends, and the impact of scientific works.

Keywords

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