1. bookVolume 16 (2021): Issue 2 (December 2021)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1857-8462
First Published
01 Jul 2005
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Falstaff’s Gluttony, Lust, Avarice, Sloth and Pride in Henry IV Part I

Published Online: 30 Dec 2021
Volume & Issue: Volume 16 (2021) - Issue 2 (December 2021)
Page range: 69 - 79
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1857-8462
First Published
01 Jul 2005
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

This paper aims at looking at Shakespeare’s character Falstaff through the prism of some of the seven deadly sins. The paper doesn’t claim that it explores all the sins present in Falstaff’s personality. The main sins that this paper examines in Falstaff’s personality are the sins of gluttony, lust, avarice, sloth, and pride. The presence of so many sins in the personality of one character that are interconnected is known as concatenation of sins. As Bernard Spivack (1958) and David Wiles (1987) have explained, in many ways Falstaff serves as the Vice figure from the morality plays tempting Prince Hal. Since in the morality plays the Vice figure stems and is associated mainly to the seven deadly sins, this paper will try to show that the fact that Falstaff possesses so many sins can facilitate the possibility of him being identified as stemming from the Vice figure from the morality plays. I will try to find each of the afore-mentioned sins by analyzing Falstaff actions and inactions and by trying to find characteristics of the sins present in Falstaff’s behavior. This paper will also look at Falstaff’s fate and whether there is any similarity between the fate of the Vice figure in the morality plays and the fate of Falstaff in the second part.

Keywords

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