1. bookVolume 16 (2021): Issue 2 (August 2021)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2344-5416
First Published
06 Mar 2015
Publication timeframe
3 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Impact of High-Performance Work-System (HPWS) on Employee-Performance: A Case Study

Published Online: 27 Sep 2021
Page range: 111 - 126
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2344-5416
First Published
06 Mar 2015
Publication timeframe
3 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Present article aims to summarize the impact of ‘High-Performance Work-System' (HPWS) on employee performance. The research evaluates and establishes the link between HPWS best practices and corporate performance by investigating the evidence of the effects of these practices on the employee’s overall attitudes on the basis of the concept of ‘Black Box’. Further, the study contributes empirically by providing possible corrective measures and suggestions to the management of the company, which can be adopted to attain the status of a ‘World Class Organization’ by the company. Initially, the skewness and kurtosis tests were performed on the survey data to examine the normality of the data. Basis this, the correlation tests were designed and executed. In the present analysis, the bivariate analysis between the various variables (both independent and dependent) as chosen were performed to explore this inter-relationship. The present research uses “Hierarchal Multiple Linear Regression” (HMLR) analysis to examine the net effect on the employee attitudinal measures due to each bundles of the HPWS best practices as highlighted in nine hypotheses. At the end, summary of the recommendations to the general users has also been listed.

Keywords

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