1. bookVolume 29 (2021): Issue 2 (April 2021)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
08 Aug 2013
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

The possibility of clinical use for the oxidative stress marker in correlation with blood flow parameters in pregnancy-induced hypertension

Published Online: 27 Apr 2021
Page range: 143 - 151
Received: 19 Nov 2020
Accepted: 24 Feb 2021
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
08 Aug 2013
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Introduction: In pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) there is a disorder in placental blood flow which causes intrauterine fetal hypoxia, and oxidative stress has a significant role in this condition. The aims of this research were to analyze the relation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), as a marker of oxidative stress and absent end-diastolic flow (AEDF), as well as the relation of TBARS and cerebroplacental ratio (CPR).

Methods: The research included 200 pregnant women in the gestation period from 28th to 40th, 100 were in a control group and 100 were with PIH. The CPR and TBARS were analyzed in all examined pregnant women. The CPR was calculated by dividing the Doppler indices of the middle cerebral artery by the umbilical artery.

Results: Mean value of TBARS in the group with the PIH who had AEDF was in the interval of high values - 43.22 μmol/l. The result shows that through the application of Spearman’s coefficient, the correlation results in a statistically significant correlation between CPR and TBARS values: ρ = - 0.249, p = 0.0001.

Conclusion: PIH has a very high level of oxidative stress, especially in pregnant women with absent end-diastolic flow in the umbilical artery and pathologic CPR. The Spearman’s test results in statistical significance and negative correlation, which means that in higher TBARS values, values of CPR are lower and vice versa, which indicates a possibility of clinical application of TBARS.

Keywords

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