1. bookVolume 9 (2020): Issue 2 (December 2020)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
08 Sep 2012
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Vertical Interaction Between a Driving Wheelset and Track in the Presence of the Rolling Surfaces Harmonic Irregularities

Published Online: 29 Jan 2021
Page range: 38 - 52
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
08 Sep 2012
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The driving wheelset is used in railway traction (locomotives, electric trains, trams, etc.) to support part of the weight of the suspended mass and to drive and brake the vehicle. The dynamics of the driving wheelset/track system is a very important issue in the railway engineering, and this paper is focused on basic features of the frequency response functions which describe the dynamic behavior in the presence of the rolling surfaces harmonic irregularities. To this end, a simple model of the driving wheelset/track system with the range of application limited up to 6-700 Hz is adopted. The driving wheelset model consists of a free-free uniform Euler-Bernoulli beam with three attached rigid bodies, representing the axle, the two wheels and the gear; the distinct feature of this model is the inertial asymmetry. Two independent infinite uniform Euler-Bernoulli beams, each on its foundation including two elastic layers for rail pad and ballast and an intermediate inertial layer for sleepers represent the track model. For simplicity, the moving irregularity model is applied to simulate the interaction between wheels and rails. Numerical simulations show that the driving wheelset/track system has three resonance frequencies, all situated in the frequency range of the evanescent waves in rails. FRF of the driving wheelset/track system have been calculated for left and right wheel/rail pair. The influence of the asymmetric inertia of the driving wheelset and the out of phase between the rolling surface irregularities are evaluated in terms of frequency response functions of the wheel/rail contact force.

Keywords

[1] X. CUI, G. CHEN, J. ZHAO, W. YAN, H. OUYANG, M. ZHU: “Field investigation and numerical study of the rail corrugation caused by frictional self-excited vibration”, Wear 376-377, 2017, 1919-1929.Search in Google Scholar

[2] T. X. MEI, J. H. YU, D. A. WILSON: “A mechatronic approach for anti-slip control in railway traction”, Proceedings of the 17th World Congress The International Federation of Automatic Control, 2008.Search in Google Scholar

[3] M. DUMITRIU: “Influence of the longitudinal and lateral suspension damping on the vibration behaviour in the railway vehicles”, Archive of Mechanical Engineering 62, 2015. 115-140.Search in Google Scholar

[4] B. FU, S. BRUNI, S. LUO: “Study on wheel polygonization of a metro vehicle based on polygonal wear simulation”, Wear 438-439, 2019, Article 203071.Search in Google Scholar

[5] Y. TIAN, S. LIU, W. J.T. DANIEL, P. A. MEEHAN: “Investigation of the impact of locomotive creep control on wear under changing contact conditions”, Vehicle System Dynamics 53, 2015, 692-709.Search in Google Scholar

[6] T. MAZILU, M. DUMITRIU: “On the steady state interaction between an asymmetric wheelset and track”, Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Conference on Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering Computing, 2011.Search in Google Scholar

[7] S. L. GRASSIE, R. W. GREGORY, D. HARRISON, K. L. JOHNSON: “The dynamic response of railway track to high frequency vertical excitation”, Journal Mechanical Engineering Science 24, 1982, 77-90.Search in Google Scholar

Recommended articles from Trend MD

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo